Sensory Diet Activities at the Playground | The OT Toolbox

Sensory Diet Activities at the Playground

The outdoors is a goldmine for play! Kids can be creative, build healthy bodies, and develop the skills that they NEED through playing outdoors. For the child who requires a sensory diet, the outdoors is a goldmine for acquiring the right kind of sensory input. The activities below are those sensory diet activities that can be accomplished through play at the playground. 


Playground sensory diet activities that kids can use for sensory needs, perfect for occupational therapists who are creating sensory diets for kids with sensory processing needs.

A while back, we shared information about sensory processing at the playground and sensory input that can be provided at the playground. Today, we wanted to share a few quick lists for sensory diet activities that can be implemented at an outdoor (or indoor) playground or play area. 

These are sensory diet activities that an occupational therapist can prescribe based on evaluation of a child's specific sensory needs. Use the playground sensory diet activities listed below as part of a list of specific activities and sensory tools that meet certain sensory processing needs or a home program for children with sensory processing challenges. 

There is a lot of research on playing outdoors and about the benefits of just playing outside! 

Disclaimer: When therapists develop a specific and highly individualized sensory diet, it's not just throwing together a day filled with sensory input. A sensory diet  is a specific set of sensory tools used to meet and address certain needs of the individual based on sensory need and strategizing. Each of the sensory diet activities above should meet specific needs of the child. Every child is different so applying sensory input to one child may look very different than that of another. Parents should use the tactics below along with your child's occupational therapist.



Playground Sensory Diet Activities


Climb the slide
Swing on the swings (side to side, forward-back, twist, superman fly, or even upside down!)
Go down the slide (forward, backwards, on belly, on back)
Roll a ball up the slide and catch it before it hits the cround
Ramps
Balance beams
Monkey bars
Rope equiptment
Elevated surfaces
Uneven surfaces
Sound tubes and equipment
Teeter totters or bouncy equipment
Merry go rounds or spinning equipment
Climbing walls
Sandbox play
Playground scavenger hunt
Tunnels (Crawl through, army crawl through)
Playground "I Spy"
Bouncing a ball against a wall
Textured sensory scavenger hunt
Climbing surfaces


Accommodations for addressing sensory needs in the backyard

For kids with sensory needs, it can be overwhelming on a playground with running children, background noises, or other sensory input. Try these accommodations for addressing sensory needs in backyard play:


Proprioceptive input such as firm touch to the shoulders
Calming vestibular sensory input such as side to side or forward-front slow swinging
Throw and play catch with a weighted ball 
Baby wipes to clean hands if child is sensitive to messy hands or dirt
Sheltered area if child is sensitive to wind blowing on skin
Wear a lightweight wind jacket
Hat with brim to reduce bright light or intense light in eyes or on face
Sunscreen with firm touch before going outdoors
Wear sunglasses
Wear headphones to reduce background noise
Sports bottle with straw
Calming, chewy snacks


More about outdoor sensory diet activities

Sensory diets and specific sensory input or sensory challenges are a big part of addressing sensory needs of children who struggle with sensory processing issues. Incorporating a schedule of sensory input (sensory diet) into a lifestyle of naturally occuring and meaningful activities is so very valuable for the child with sensory needs. 

That's why I've worked to create a book on creating an authentic and meaningful sensory lifestyle that addresses sensory needs. You can watch for more information on this book coming very soon. 

If you would like to be the first to know more about this book (and want to grab some upcoming freebies related to sensory lifestyles and sensory diet activities), sign up here. You'll be the first to get some awesome tools for addressing sensory needs in motivating and meaningful ways.