April Occupational Therapy Calendar Ideas

Can you believe we are heading into April already?  This year is flying by and Spring with it’s warmer weather is on the horizon.  Today, I’ve got your April Occupational Therapy calendar for you AND awesome news.  I have a HUGE resource for you that will carry you throughout the rest of Spring with treatment ideas and activities that are designed to meet the needs of many common goal areas.  This resource is perfect for planning a month or a season of therapeutic activities for kids.





If you’ve seen the last few months’ calendars (Check them out, if you missed them: January, February, & March), then you will see that this month’s calendar is just a bit different.  I’ve found that I completely love coming up with themed activities that are designed to address many needs of children receiving (or who need to receive) Occupational Therapy services.  I’m enjoying this monthly calendar so much that I decided to take it a bit further.


For April’s calendar, I decided to provide MORE ideas, more ways to develop necessary skills, and more ways to cover many more systems of development. 


This month’s calendar is essentially going to rock your OT kiddo’s socks!

Spring Occupational Therapy Activities



April Occupational Therapy Activity Ideas for Treatment

This month, I’ve decided to create a huge resource for your OT treatment activity ideas.  You will be able to grab the printable calendar by subscribing to our newsletter list and a PDF resource sheet in The OT Toolbox store, or right HERE.  Each month’s calendar is such a valuable resource of OT ideas, and this month is no different, except that it has a TON more ideas to address many areas of deficits that typically present in kids receiving OT services.  I’ve got Spring themed activities that can be modified to meet the needs of your child. 
Williams & Shellenberger Pyramid of Learning
Each activity takes into account, the Williams and Shellenberger Pyramid of Learning.  They allow for proper sensory integration in order to adjust for the child’s needs and presenting areas of difficulty. The activities are designed to meet the foundations of sensory needs in order to work on higher tasks that present as difficulties in functional skills.  And what I like best about this month’s calendar, is that the activities can be adapted in several different ways so that the resource calendar can be used over and over again in coming months. In fact, there are 109 activities in this book using all of the combinations of activities. 109!
 
I told you this would rock your OT socks, right?
 
Grab your April Occupational Therapy calendar by signing up for our newsletter.  You will be directed to a link where you can download April’s calendar and all of the other freebies I’ve offered in the past.  
 
Note: This month’s calendar is a little different that the last few calendars.  I’m including a schedule of sensory activities but it does not include specifics to perform each day’s task.  You’ll need the Spring Occupational Therapy Activities ebook in order to complete each day’s activity.  You will be guided through sensory activities that meet many different goal areas.  
 
The coolest thing about this book is that you can complete the activities all season long.  This ebook will carry you through the next few months as you work on each task and it’s breakdown of variant activities. 
 
It’s all included in the ebook:
Spring Occupational Therapy activities

Get your guide to the this Spring’s Occupational Therapy activities today!  Use it all Spring long as you go through each task outlined in the book.

April Occupational Therapy calendar of activities
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So, here’s what you need to do:
  1. Subscribe to our newsletter and grab your April calendar. It’s free!
  2. Buy the Spring Occupational Therapy Activities ebook.
  3. Play your way through the next few months with Spring-y activities that are broken down into several different goal areas.  
                                                    That’s it!
 
Get started and join our newsletter. 

Alphabet Dice Letter Formation Fine Motor Activity

I love to add a fine motor spin to learning activities.  When it comes to teaching kids to write letters, knowing correct formation (and the order of making lines in writing a letter) is so important for handwriting legibility and eventually speed of written work.  


This fine motor peg board activity incorporates eye-hand coordination and tripod grasp to manipulate pegs in order to build letter formation skills, and using a dice, which adds a power in-hand manipulation component to the activity…with a bit of fun mixed in.  Overall, this was a fun activity that all four of my kiddos loved!




his fine motor peg board activity incorporates eye-hand coordination and tripod grasp to manipulate pegs in order to build letter formation skills, and using a dice, which adds a power in-hand manipulation component to the activity...with a bit of fun mixed in.

Fine Motor Alphabet Letter Formation Activity with Dice and a Peg Board

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To make the letters in this activity, I pulled out one of may favorite tools from my Occupational Therapy bag: My trusty pegboard and small pegs. The pegs are small enough to encourage a tripod grasp allow for in-hand manipulation, and removing the pegs works on intrinsic strength and arch development of the hand. We used the pegs and the alphabet dice from our Scattergories game (you can get just the dice here.) to work on forming letters with correct lines.

his fine motor peg board activity incorporates eye-hand coordination and tripod grasp to manipulate pegs in order to build letter formation skills, and using a dice, which adds a power in-hand manipulation component to the activity...with a bit of fun mixed in.

I had my kids take turns at this activity.  They rolled the dice and then used the pegs to form the letters.  I gave just a few verbal cues to show them how to make the curved lines of certain letters like “G” or “C”.  To make this activity easier, you can draw a letter on a piece of paper that is cut to fit the pegboard.  Kids can press the letters through the paper and into the holes of the peg board.

his fine motor peg board activity incorporates eye-hand coordination and tripod grasp to manipulate pegs in order to build letter formation skills, and using a dice, which adds a power in-hand manipulation component to the activity...with a bit of fun mixed in.


Fine Motor Skills When Playing with a Peg Board

Using a peg board works on so many fine motor skills. I’ve shared a ton of info on this before. A basic break down of the fine motor benefits of playing with a peg board:


Fine Motor Skills Used When Rolling a Dice

The bonus for this activity is the fine motor benefit to rolling a dice.  Cupping the palm to roll and release the dice encourages fine motor skills necessary for many functional tasks:
 
 Looking for more ways to play and learn with dice? Try these:

Rainbow Bear Dice Game for Preschoolers from Life Over C’s 
Place Value Game with Dice from Still Playing School 
Rainforest Dice Long and Short Vowel Reading Game from Learning 2 Walk
Preschool Rainbow Grid Game from Preschool Powol Packets
 
Fun Shapes Dice Game for Kids from School Time Snippets 
Writing Game Using Dice from Teach me Mommy 
Venn Diagram Dice Probability STEM Activity from Schooling a Monkey 
Block Stacking Dice Game from Kidz Activities 
Simple Addition Dice Game from Powerful Mothering 
DIY Dice from Sugar Spice & Glitter

his fine motor peg board activity incorporates eye-hand coordination and tripod grasp to manipulate pegs in order to build letter formation skills, and using a dice, which adds a power in-hand manipulation component to the activity...with a bit of fun mixed in.

More Fine Motor Activities you will love: 

 Scooping and pouring fine motor and hand dominance with beads
  

Intrinsic Muscle Strengthening with Egg Cartons

Recently, I shared how intrinsic muscle strength benefits handwriting and specifically a functional grasp on the pencil.  Today, I’ve got a super easy way to work on endurance with the lumbrical muscles that are used in maintaining a nice pencil grasp.  This will enable a child to write at appropriate speeds and lengths of time without fatiguing and allow a child to color in a picture without stopping becasue their hands are tired.  The bonus to today’s activity is that the strengthening tool is very easy to re-create and (almost) completely free.

This would be an awesome compliment to our recent 31 Days of Occupational Therapy activities using Free or Almost Free Materials!


Work on pencil grasp by strengthening the intrinsic muscles of the hands including the lumbricals using a recycled egg carton and straws!

Intrinsic Muscles of the Hands Lumbricals Strengthening Exercise

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For this activity, we used a recycled egg carton, a wooden skewer, and cut pieces of straws.

Use the top of the egg carton and poke holes using the wooden skewer.  Wiggle the skewer until the holes are larger.  Cut the straws into one inch sized pieces, and you are ready to go!

Work on pencil grasp by strengthening the intrinsic muscles of the hands including the lumbricals using a recycled egg carton and straws!

Show your kiddo how to poke the straw pieces into the holes.  We used both sides of the egg carton, but using the inside of the egg carton sections especially works on the lumbrical muscles in the hand.  Holding the small straw sections requires a tripod grasp and when the child is required to push the straw through the hole in the section of the egg carton, they are positioning their hand in an Intrinsic Plus Position.  


Ask your child to hold several straw pieces in their hand at once to address in-hand manipulation. This skill is needed to manipulate the pencil and rotate the pencil during handwriting tasks.


We cut off the lid of our egg carton for this activity.  It was a good way to work on bilateral hand coordination which is necessary for holding the paper and pencil with two different hands during a hand writing task. 


Once the straws are partially in the holes of the egg carton, your child can press them the rest of the way through the hole, utilizing finger isolation.  Then, turn the egg carton over and use a tripod grasp to pull the straws the rest of the way through the holes.

Work on pencil grasp by strengthening the intrinsic muscles of the hands including the lumbricals using a recycled egg carton and straws!

Read about how and why this is great for handwriting here.

Looking for more ways to recycle an egg carton?  Try these: 
 egg cartons 
Egg Carton Mache Molds by Teach me Mommy 
Flowers by The Gingerbread House 
Daffodils by Nemscok Farms 
Space Station by Peakle Pie 
Egg Carton Mosaic Art  by Our Whimsical Days

Work on pencil grasp by strengthening the intrinsic muscles of the hands including the lumbricals using a recycled egg carton and straws!

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MORE handwriting exercises you will love:

 fine motor writing activity Pencil Grasp Activity Pencil Grasp Exercise Thumb opposition activity

 Magnetic Spoons and Handwriting Game


Fine Motor Weather Writing Prompts

This fine motor weather craft is a fun way to work on a few fine motor skills while encouraging creative writing and handwriting, too!  We’ve talked about pinch grip strength and clothes pins before and this craft is a fun way to extend those strengthening skills.  I love to add a bit of strengthening and proprioceptive input before a handwriting task, so these clothes pins fit the bill before a weather themed handwriting task!  Warm up the hands with a few pinch exercises and then work on handwriting skills during a creative writing or journal topic about weather!


Fine motor weather craft with clothes pins. These are great for a creative writing journal prompt based on weather and a warm up exercise before handwriting.

Fine Motor Weather Clothes Pin Craft


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We started with a pile of wooden clothes pins and a few other materials:
glue

Fine motor weather craft with clothes pins. These are great for a creative writing journal prompt based on weather and a warm up exercise before handwriting.
Cut the weather shapes from the materials and glue to the clothes pins.  For the sun, cut a circle and cut rays.  For the cloud, cut a cloud shape from the fleece and raindrops from the blue card stock.  For the thunderstorm, cut a cloud shape from the blue card stock and a lightning bolt from the yellow craft foam.  For the snowflake, simply glue the foam shape on the clothes pin.

Fine motor weather craft with clothes pins. These are great for a creative writing journal prompt based on weather and a warm up exercise before handwriting.

Weather Themed Writing Creative Journal Prompts

Fine motor weather craft with clothes pins. These are great for a creative writing journal prompt based on weather and a warm up exercise before handwriting.
We used these weather clothes pin crafts in a creative writing assignment.  Have your child choose a clothes pin and clip it to their notebook or top of their paper.  They can use the weather type to brainstorm creative journal topics based on the weather.  For example, if they choose the sun, they could write about activities they like to do in the sun, their favorite thing about sunny weather, or their favorite memory from a sunny day.  I ask my second grader to write like she’s been instructed at school: One topic sentence, three supporting sentences, and a closing statement.  

Fine motor weather craft with clothes pins. These are great for a creative writing journal prompt based on weather and a warm up exercise before handwriting.


Fine Motor Warm Up before Handwriting

Using the clothes pins as a fine motor warm up is a great way to build strength and “wake up” the muscles needed to write.  Let me know if you try this activity at home. I would love to hear about it!

Looking for more weather themed activities?  Try these:

Fine motor weather craft with clothes pins. These are great for a creative writing journal prompt based on weather and a warm up exercise before handwriting.
You’ll love these fine motor activities:

 

Easy Bite Sized Chocolate Dipped Pretzels

My kids love to cook.  They come running when I say it’s time to help me cook. When melted chocolate is involved, they come running just a little faster.  Who am I kidding?  They come running at full speed when chocolate is involved.  


We made these easy chocolate dipped mini pretzels one day when I had a niece and nephew over for the day.  (I’m totally going for the Best Aunt award, here. Chocolate covered pretzels?  I’ve got this!) 


Sometimes, it’s nice to have a little treat, but a mom wants to keep the sugar intake on the low side. We made these mini pretzel rods for a bite size chocolate-y treat that would be perfect for parties or special events.


Chocolate diped pretzel bites are perfect for cooking with kids and a cooking activity at preschool or a play date! Love these for kids parties, too!

Mini Chocolate Covered Pretzel Bites



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Chocolate diped pretzel bites are perfect for cooking with kids and a cooking activity at preschool or a play date! Love these for kids parties, too!

 

You’ll need just a few ingredients for this recipe:
Mini pretzel rods
Chocolate melts 
Sprinkles, dried coconut, chocolate chips, nuts, or what ever you’ve got in the house.

Chocolate diped pretzel bites are perfect for cooking with kids and a cooking activity at preschool or a play date! Love these for kids parties, too!

This recipe is easy enough to make with kids without a huge mess.  Melt the chocolate melts over the stove top.  This is a job for an adult or an older child.


Using a spoon, drag the melted chocolate over the mini pretzel rods.  Place them on a sheet of wax paper.  For easy, use a lipped tray like a jelly roll pan.  This will contain the mess and keep sprinkles and toppings from rolling on the floor.


Pour sprinkles into small rubbermaid containers.  This is a great way to incorporate fine motor skills into the cooking process.  Kids can pinch or scoop the coverings on the melted chocolate. 

Chocolate diped pretzel bites are perfect for cooking with kids and a cooking activity at preschool or a play date! Love these for kids parties, too!

 

HINT:  Use larger containers for dumping sprinkles over the pretzel rods.  We also used halves of the mini pretzels for an even smaller treat.  These pretzel bites were perfect for a small snack!

Chocolate diped pretzel bites are perfect for cooking with kids and a cooking activity at preschool or a play date! Love these for kids parties, too!

 

Stop by and see what the other bloggers in the Kids in the Kitchen blogging team have cooked up:

Homemade Taco Seasoning | Royal Little Lambs
Mud Pudding  | Raising Little Superheroes
Roll-Out Butter Cookies | The Gifted Gabber
Marble Pound Cake | Kitchen Counter Chronicles
Easy Zucchini Muffins | Mess for Less
Chocolate diped pretzel bites are perfect for cooking with kids and a cooking activity at preschool or a play date! Love these for kids parties, too!



Looking for more cooking with kids recipes?  Here are some of our favorites:

Vegetable Quesadilla Recipe   Honey Nut Popcorn  Antipasto Skewers
M is for MushroomsVeggie Quesadilla Recipe | N is for NutsHoney Roasted Nuts Popcorn | O is for OlivesAntipasto Skewer Kabobs | P is for Peppers: Asian Chicken

Musical Bell Color Matching Dominoes

These DIY dominoes are a great tool for addressing auditory processing needs!


When I saw the theme for this week’s Learning with Manipulatives series was dominoes, I was excited.  My kids love playing with dominoes!  They love dominoes of all kinds, from craft stick dominoes to our math sensory bottle that had slowly sinking dominoes.  I had a few different learning activities in mind…but then I couldn’t find our dominoes!  Not to worry, I threw together these DIY bell dominoes that were perfect for color matching with an auditory processing twist. 

Auditory processing dominoes made with bells are perfect for a color matching activity, and can be graded to meet the auditory needs of all ages.

DIY Bell Dominoes



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Auditory processing dominoes made with bells are perfect for a color matching activity, and can be graded to meet the auditory needs of all ages.

To make these bell dominoes, you need just three items:
Corrugated cardboard
Pipe Cleaners
Bells (Ours were from www.craftprojectideas.com)


You’ll also need scissors and a black marker.

Auditory processing dominoes made with bells are perfect for a color matching activity, and can be graded to meet the auditory needs of all ages.

 

Cut rectangles from the sheet of corrugated cardboard.  Using the wire in the pipe cleaner, poke a hole in one end of the rectangle.  Thread the bell onto the pipe cleaner.  Bend the pipe cleaner over and poke it through the cardboard again.  Gently twist the ends of the pipe cleaner together and snip the long end of the pipe cleaner.  Repeat on the other end of the domino.  


I used random colored bells to create dominoes that were perfect for color matching.  My preschooler loved this game and we played several rounds, just working on color matching.

Auditory processing dominoes made with bells are perfect for a color matching activity, and can be graded to meet the auditory needs of all ages.

Auditory Processing Activity with Bell Dominoes

Many children demonstrate auditory processing difficulties.  Difficulties with processing the sounds around them, in classrooms, and in conversation can present in many different ways. I came up with simple ways to use these DIY dominoes to address auditory processing problems in fun and game-like ways.

Auditory processing dominoes made with bells are perfect for a color matching activity, and can be graded to meet the auditory needs of all ages.
Auditory Processing Listening Activities
  • Play the bell dominoes game and ask your child to close their eyes when it is not their turn. They need to listen for the sound of the bells and tell with it is their turn by saying when the bells have stopped. Listening for the bells’ sounds addresses auditory attending.
  • Play from further distances by having the child cross the room after they’ve taken their turn.  They need to listen to hear when the bell has stopped before coming back to take their turn. This addresses auditory attending and auditory discrimination.
  • Play with various background noises.
  • When playing, take turns tapping out patterns before placing the domino in it’s place in the game.
  • Grade these games by rolling a dice and assigning a number on the dice with a colored bell.
Auditory processing dominoes made with bells are perfect for a color matching activity, and can be graded to meet the auditory needs of all ages.
Want to see more ways to play and learn with dominoes?  Try these:

 

Robot Domino Math Game from Learning 2 Walk
Domino Addition Game from The Kindergarten Connection
DIY Alphabet Dominoes from Adventures of Adam
Name Recognition with Dominoes from Line Upon Line Learning
Dominoes Sensory Bin from Something 2 Offer


You’ll love these domino activities that we did:
 
 

The Ultimate Guide to Play

Play is work of the child.  Through play, a child learns about the world around him.  He learns communication skills, problem solving, builds fine and gross motor development, enhances social interactions, and develops the skills needed for independence in all aspects of growth.  

This month in the Functional Skills for Kids series, myself and nine other Occupational and Physical Therapists have teamed up to share everything play. This is an ultimate guide to development, progression of skills, environmental aspects, modification of play, and how play is used as a therapeutic tool.  

You can see previous Functional Skills for Kids series here.  

Childhood development and play


Play and the child in fine motor skills, gross motor skills, developmental progression of play, helping attention and social skills through play, and using play as a therapeutic tool in Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy with kids.

How Play Makes Therapy Better | Therapy Fun Zone

Play and the child in fine motor skills, gross motor skills, developmental progression of play, helping attention and social skills through play, and using play as a therapeutic tool in Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy with kids.

Be sure to stop back next month to see what the Functional Skills for Kids team does next month!

Lemon STEM Science Ideas

I am one of three sisters.  You might remember that this blog started out as a meeting place for us gals to share our ideas.  Well, times change and blogs change, but there is one thing that never changes:  sisters.  You grow up with them, you fight with them, you make some crazy funny memories with them, you grow up some more, and then you laugh at those memories. (And occasionally you laugh so hard you spit out water…causing more laughter.) 

There is one thing for certain.  Sisters have a bond that is like no other.  

So, when I became a mama to three little girls (and their super-chill brother), I was over the moon and back to watch these sisters grow just like I did with my two siblings.  Now that they are getting a little older, I can see my oldest nurture the younger ones and the little sisters look up to their big sis.  (And I won’t lie.  They fight.  Like Mom-wants-to-fly-back-to-the-moon-and-stay-there kind of fighting.)  But happily playing or fighting, they are sisters.

One thing I love to watch is when these girls play.  They’ve got some super sweet scenarios that happen on a daily basis.  Playtime in our house involves clipboards, checklists, tons of purses, glue, and the occasional microphone.  The big two have big imaginations and even bigger hearts and it is so fun to watch my youngest look up the them with wide eyes and take it all in.  

As a mom, I’ve noticed that my girls watch.  They watch what I do, they watch what each other does, and they notice.  So, when I had the opportunity to introduce them to the Green Works StemBox, I jumped at the chance.  Introduce them to creativity through STEM?  Sounds great! Encourage my children to get excited about science and math? YES! Unleash natural potential in my girls by experiencing science projects? I like it. 
Lemon STEM ideas for kids





And the best for me, was watching my girls do this together.  The baby saw her big sister in safety goggles as she learned about cathodes and electrolytes…and has been wearing the goggles every day since.  Seeing them inspire each other was just awesome.

When we opened the GreenWorks StemBox, we were excited to get started on our experiment; We were making lemon powered batteries!

I was surprised to read that only 1 in 1,000 girls pursue STEM careers, especially considering that out us us three sisters, two of us are in the health/science field.  Encouraging my girls to explore interests in science is important to me so reading more about the Green Works StemBox was very interesting.  In order to inspire girls to seek out a career in science, GreenWorks has partnered with StemBox to create monthly subscription box aimed at providing hands-on science experiments to explore science, math, engineering and technology.  Green Works is helping the next generation of female scientists to discover their natural potential in the field of science.  Green Works supports girls in STEM and knows that when women get involved in science, great things happen.  Their story started with a female scientist, Maria Ochomogo, who led a team that created the laundry and household cleaners that make up today’s Green Works line of products. 

A portion of each Green Works StemBox subscription will be donated to the AAUW, (The American Association of University Women) in order to continue the empowerment of women and girls through education, advocacy, research, and philanthropy.  Check out GreenWorksCleaners.com for more information.

After reading all of that, I was super pumped to get my girls excited about our science experiment…and the enthusiasm was catchy!

Lemon STEM Ideas

We pulled out all of the items in our lemon experiment box:
LED Bulb
4 Lemons ( not included )
Alligator Clips
Zinc Nails
Copper Wire
Goggles
Gloves
Instructions Page
Pin
Green Works Wipes
Mini Clock
Sheet
STEM Sticker

Lemon STEM Science experiment ideas for kids
And we got started on our STEM project.  The instructions were printed out with easy to follow images.  

Lemon STEM Science experiment ideas for kids
First, we used the convenient Green Works Wipes to swipe away a few of the the baby’s sticky crumbs from our dining room table.  (Sticky toddlers love science, too.)

Lemon STEM Science experiment ideas for kids
Lemon STEM Science experiment ideas for kids
  • Following the instructions, my eight year old build a lemon powered battery that lit up a light bulb.  We tried a few more experiments, like the mini fruit clock that came in the kit.  


  • We pulled out some bamboo skewers and created a sky high lemon battery and lit up the light bulbs using engineering in our STEM activity.

  • With all of the zinc nail-punctured holes in our lemons, we HAD to squeeze the juice.  We tried to see if we could create a lemon clock using just the lemon juice in a cup.  It worked!  

  • After the lemons were juiced, we tried to make another light bulb glow using the rinds.  This time the lights did not brighten and we decided it was because the electrolytes were squeezed away into our lemon juice and the current stopped at the rind.  


After all of these experiments, we were feeling a little thirsty.  Non-lemon powered light bulbs went off and so my four year old had a bright idea to make lemonade.  We added water and sugar and drank away the electrolytes!

It was so much fun to see my girls working together, encouraging each other, (not fighting), and being inspired in science.  Someday they might look back at our experiment day and laugh at drinking their science experiment, but I’ll remember the sticky crumbs on the table, the goggles on the one year old, and the fun we all had learning together.

Lemon STEM Science experiment ideas for kids
Want to get a StemBox subscription for your home or for girls you know?  
Stem Boxes are designed to be fun and engaging for girls ages 7 to 13.
Subscription cost:
Month to month = $36
3 month pre-pay = $28
6 month pre-pay = $170
Check out more info on StemBox here.
Lemon STEM Science experiment ideas for kids

Lemon STEM Science experiment ideas for kids
Looking for more STEM ideas for kids?  You will love these:

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Green Works . The opinions and text are all mine.

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