Free Visual Perception Packet

Free visual perceptual skills worksheets

These free visual perception worksheets are just the resource you need to work on visual skills like form constancy, visual discrimination, visual closure, and more. Visual perception is an area that drives so much of what we do. For kids who struggle with visual perceptual skills, so many areas are impacted. Visual perception impacts reading, writing, learning, comprehension, visual motor skills (including copying written materials), fine motor work, gross motor skills, eye-hand coordination, and even social emotional skills! It’s amazing how this one area can impact so many areas of a life and functioning. Because some f our popular free visual perception worksheets have been used by so many therapists, I wanted to pull these resources together into an easy to access visual perception worksheet packet! This is it! Your 17 page packet of free visual perception worksheets can be accessed below.

Use these free visual perception worksheets to work on so many skills kieds need for reading and learning: visual attention, visual perception, visual closure, form constancy, spatial relations, and more!

Visual Perception Worksheets

Visual perception is made up of several areas that are crucial to development, learning, and functioning. Visual attention, visual spatial relations, visual closure, visual discrimination,

That’s why I wanted to bring to you a valuable resource when it comes to understanding visual perception AND visual processing skills.

Below, enter your email in the form box and the visual perception worksheets packet will be delivered to your inbox. I need to send it via email as the packet is a large file. This one form will get you the entire 17 page packet, where the other forms on the other pages in this packet will deliver just one page. I am working behind the scenes to edit all of the other posts in this series of free worksheets so they deliver the big packet. 

More visual perception resources:

Very soon, I will be sharing BIG news related to a new resource here on The OT Toolbox. To get everyone excited, and to share some resources that we already have here on the site, I’ve put together this collection of free visual perception printables. While these are scattered all over this website and already available as free downloads, I wanted to pull all of the worksheets together (along with a few new ones added to the bunch) to create a 17 page packet of visual perception worksheets.

Add your email below to get the free packet. You’ll also receive some inside info regarding the upcoming resource that we will be hosting here on The OT Toolbox.

In the packet are a few themed visual perception worksheets. You’ll find reproducible sheets to address figure-ground, form constancy, visual discrimination, as well as oculomotor skills like saccadic movements.

Visual Perceptual Skills and worksheets

Some of the worksheets included address:
Visual Figure-Ground
Visual Attention
Form Constancy
Visual Discrimination
Visual Memory
Sequential Memory
Visual Closure
Visual Spatial-Relations

…as well as eye-hand coordination needed to complete pencil control exercises.

All of the worksheets are similar in style, making them a great collection for YOUR therapy toolbox!

For now, grab your visual perception printables, and start working on those visual skills!
Enter your email to get the worksheet packet and BIG NEWS on an upcoming visual perception resource.

Be sure to watch for more news on an upcoming visual processing resource. It’s going to be BIG!

I’m so excited to share more information with you very soon. It’s going to be gooooood!

More Information on Visual Perception Worksheets:

For more information on the worksheets in this free packet, check out these posts describing some of the worksheets included in this packet of free visual perception worksheets:

Monkey Theme Visual Perception Worksheet

Flower Theme Visual Perception Worksheet

Space Theme Visual Perception Worksheet

Outer Space Theme Visual Perception Worksheet

More visual processing activities

For even MORE information on visual perception and activities to use in your occupational therapy practice, you will want to join our free visual processing lab email series. It’s a 3-day series of emails that covers EVERYthing about visual processing. We take a closer look at visual skills and break things down, as well as covering the big picture of visual needs.


In the visual processing lab, you will discover how oculomotor skills like smooth pursuits make a big difference in higher level skills like learning and executive function. The best thing about this lab (besides all of the awesome info) is that it has a fun “lab” theme. I might have had too much fun with this one ūüôā


Join us in visual processing Lab! Where you won’t need Bunsen burners or safety goggles!


Click here to learn more about Visual Processing Lab and to sign up.

Free visual processing email lab to learn about visual skills needed in learning and reading.
Use visual perception worksheets to work on visual perceptual skills like figure-ground, visual discrimination, visual closure, visual attention, and other skills needed for handwriting, reading, and learning.
Add these free visual perception worksheets to your therapy toolbox to work on visual processing skills like visual spatial awareness, figure ground, form constancy, visual closure and other perceptual skills in kids.

Development of Eye-Hand Coordination

Development of eye hand coordination

Eye-hand coordination development typically occurs through movement, beginning at a very young age. The visual components of oculomotor skills (how the eyes move) include visual fixation, visual tracking (or smooth pursuits), and visual scanning. These beginning stages of child development play a big part down the road in taking in visual information and using it to perform motor tasks. 


Eye hand coordination develops from a very young age! Here is information about the development of visual motor skills, specifically eye hand coordination in babies, toddlers, and preschoolers.

Eye Hand Coordination Development

{These are general guidelines of development based on approximate development of the visual motor skills needed for play, motor skills, and visual motor development.}
Holding and talking to baby in the very young ages plays such an important part in the puzzle of visual motor skills. 


Additionally, tummy time and as the baby gains head strength and control, they eyes become stronger in their ability to fixate, track, and scan from the prone position. This is why we place toys around a baby on a baby blanket and encourage reach. That pivotal stage when baby begins to roll is a social media-worthy time in the parent’s life. But there is more to celebrate than baby’s new rolling skills. Control of the eyes with movement is a big accomplishment and something that baby strengthens with movement.¬†

Hand and Eye Coordination

These skill areas are broken down by months, all the way up through the preschool years. 


Disclaimer: Amazon affiliate links are included in this post.

ONE MONTH:
     Tracking a rattle while lying on back                                    
     Tracking a rattle to the side                
   
TWO MONTHS:
     Infant regards their own hands
     Tracks a ball side to side as it rolls across a table left to right and right to left.
     Tracks a rattle while lying on back side to side
   
THREE MONTHS:
     Extends hands to reach for a rattle/toy while lying on back
   
FOUR MONTHS:
     Reaches to midline for a rattle/toy while lying on back
     While lying on back, the infant touches both hands together.


Crawling on the hands and knees plays a vital role in eye hand coordination, too. When baby positions themselves up on all fours, they are gaining awesome proprioceptive input, strength in the shoulder girdle, core, and neck. When crawling, baby is gaining mobility, but also using targeted movement toward a goal they visually process. Research shows that hands-and-knees and walker-assisted locomotor experience facilitate spatial search performance. Spatial awareness and visual skill development is needed for coordinated use of the hands in motor tasks.


In fact, crawling improves so many areas needed for refined eye-hand coordination, including the fine motor skills, gross motor skills, balance, and strength needed for tasks like precision of in-hand manipulation, positioning in activities, and sustained endurance.

Eye hand coordination develops from infancy! Playing with baby in tummy time is a crucial element to eye hand coordination development.


SIX MONTHS:
¬† ¬† ¬†Brings hands together to grasp a block/toy while sitting supported on an adult’s lap
     Extends arm to reach up for a toy while laying on back
   
SEVEN MONTHS:
¬† ¬† ¬†Transfers a block/toy from one hand to the other while sitting supported on an adult’s lap.
     Touches a cereal piece with index finger
¬† ¬† ¬†Bangs a toy on a table surface while sitting supported on an adult’s lap

NINE MONTHS:
     Claps hands together

TEN MONTHS:
     Removes loose pegs from a Peg Board

ELEVEN MONTHS:
     Removes socks
     Releases a cereal bit onto table surface
     Places blocks into a cup

A lot of eye hand coordination development occurs in the toddler years. Here are developmental milestones for eye hand coordination from 1-3 years.

Development of Eye Hand Coordination for Toddlers

TWELVE MONTHS/ ONE YEAR:
     Turns pages in a board book
     Imitates stirring a spoon in a cup

THIRTEEN MONTHS:
     Imitates tapping a spoon on a cup
     Begins to places large puzzle pieces in a beginner puzzle

FOURTEEN MONTHS:
     Scribbles on paper

SIXTEEN MONTHS:
     Imitates building a tower of 2-3 blocks

NINETEEN-TWENTY MONTHS:
     Builds a block tower, stacking 4-5 blocks

TWENTY THREE-TWENTY FOUR MONTHS:
     Imitates copying vertical lines


TWENTY FIVE-TWENTY SIX MONTHS:
     Removes a screw top lid on a bottle
     Stacks 8 blocks
     Begins to snip with scissors

TWENTY SEVEN-TWENTY EIGHT MONTHS:
     Imitates horizontal strokes with a marker
     Strings 2 Beads
     Imitates folding a piece of paper (bending the paper and making a crease, not aligning the edges)

TWENTY NINE MONTHS:
     Imitates building a train with blocks
     Strings 3-4 Beads
     Stacks 10 blocks

THIRTY ONE MONTHS:
¬† ¬† ¬†Builds a “bridge” with three¬†blocks

THIRTY THREE MONTHS:
     Copies a circle

THIRTY FIVE MONTHS:
¬† ¬† ¬†Builds a “wall” with four¬†blocks

Eye hand development continues in the preschool years. Here are ways that eye hand coordination develops in preschool and how to improve these visual motor skills.

Eye hand Coordination in Preschoolers

THIRTY SEVEN MONTHS:
     Cuts a paper in half with scissors

FORTY MONTHS:
     Lace 2-3 holes with string on Lacing Shapes
     Copies a cross

FORTY TWO MONTHS:
     Cuts within 1/2 inch of a strait line.
     Traces a horizontal line

FIFTY MONTHS:
     Copies a square
     Cuts a circle within 1/2 inch of the line
¬† ¬† ¬†Build “steps” with¬†blocks

FIFTY FOUR MONTHS:
     Connects two dots to make a horizontal line.
     Cuts a square within 1/2 inch of the line
¬† ¬† ¬†Builds a “pyramid” with¬†blocks

FIFTY FIVE MONTHS:
     Folds a piece of paper in half with the edges parallel
     Colors within lines


There is so much happening through regular play, interaction with babies and toddlers at each stage. What’s important to know is that the development doesn’t stop there!¬†


Studies have shown that eye-hand coordination impacts learning, communication, social-emotional skills, attention, and focus. Wow! 

Coordination Skills

Here are some ideas to work on eye-hand coordination for preschooler kids and older: 
This Letter Eye Hand Coordination Activity helps with bilateral coordination and the visual processing skills needed for reading and so many other skills. 


Try this scooping and pouring eye-hand coordination activity that can be adjusted to meet the needs of many ages and abilities.

More visual processing activities

For even MORE information on eye-hand coordination and activities to use in your occupational therapy practice, you will want to join our free visual processing lab email series. It’s a 3-day series of emails that covers EVERYthing about visual processing. We take a closer look at visual skills and break things down, as well as covering the big picture of visual needs.

In the visual processing lab, you will discover how oculomotor skills like smooth pursuits make a big difference in higher level skills like learning and executive function. The best thing about this lab (besides all of the awesome info) is that it has a fun “lab” theme. I might have had too much fun with this one ūüôā

Join us in visual processing Lab! Where you won’t need Bunsen burners or safety goggles!

Click here to learn more about Visual Processing Lab and to sign up.


Free visual processing email lab to learn about visual skills needed in learning and reading.
Work on eye-hand coordination with preschoolers by building with blocks!
 
Try activities like geoboards, pegboards, and lacing beads to improve eye hand coordination development in kids.

References:
Kermoian, Rosanne & Campos, Joseph. (1988). Locomotor Experience: A Facilitator of Spatial Cognitive Development. Child development. 59. 908-17. 10.2307/1130258. 

Ambidexterity or Mixed Dominance

What is ambidexterity

Ambidexterity is a common question among parents of kids who switch hands in activities or don’t use one hand consistently. Are you wondering about a child who uses both hands to write or perform tasks? Maybe you know a child who uses both hands equally and with equal skill. Perhaps your child uses one hand for specific tasks and their other hand for other tasks. How do you know if your child is ambidextrous or if they are showing signs of mixed dominance? This post will explain a little more about ambidexterity as well as mixed dominance and what it means in motor skills.

For a few fun hand dominance activities, try these ideas to help kids establish a preferred hand.

Understand ambidexterity and hand dominance in kids with this information that explains ambidextrous motor patterns.

What is Ambidexterity?

Just yesterday on The OT Toolbox, we discussed mixed dominance. In this post, we will cover more about true ambidexterity and what that means.

Mixed Dominance or Ambidexterity?

Is my child ambidextrous? Isn’t that what mixed dominance is? These are two questions that therapists get asked frequently when evaluating a child for the first time for mixed dominance and other concerns. The answer is no, they are not the same thing.

A child with mixed dominance demonstrates clear, stronger patterns based on the side of the body they are utilizing to complete the task. For example, a child who is left hand dominant will develop a stronger fine motor pattern then a child who is not left side dominant but compensating for fatigue and is moderately adept at utilizing the left hand as a coping skill.

A child who is truly ambidextrous will be equally as skilled at utilizing both sides of the body and it will look and feel natural to the child. Statistically, only 1% of the population is truly ambidextrous‚ÄĒit‚Äôs really very rare, and it is more likely that your child is experiencing mixed dominance patterns.

True ambidexterity requires both hands to be used with equal precision and there is no true preference in either the right or left hand for either both fine or gross motor tasks.

What Causes Mixed Dominance?

This is a tricky area. Therapists recognize mixed dominance as a miscommunication or poor integration of the left and right sides of the brain and that‚Äôs how it‚Äôs explained to parents. However, there is a lot of information out there on this topic that may or may not be relevant to your child and her struggles‚ÄĒ keep this in mind when Googling information.

It is more likely, that your child‚Äôs brain is utilizing the left and right sides for very specific motor skills such as writing, eating and throwing a ball. This can lead to motor confusion‚ÄĒthis is where the poor integration and lack of communication between the left and right sides of the brain comes into play. When the child is not utilizing one side of the brain more dominantly for motor patterns, confusion and poor motor learning occur leading to delays and deficits in motor skills.
It is unclear why the brain develops this way, but it does happen, and it is okay. In fact, it is easily addressed by an occupational therapist.

Mixed Dominance and Motor Development

I already touched on this a little, but a child with mixed dominance may switch sides for task completion when experiencing fatigue. Due to this, their motor development and precision is typically delayed. The most common area that this is noted in is in fine motor development for handwriting. This is because the child is equally, but poorly skilled with both hands, and will switch hands to compensate for fatigue.

Motor delays may also be noticed later on when it comes to the reciprocal movements needed to throw/catch or kick a ball and when skipping. A child with mixed dominance may attempt to catch and throw with the same hand, hold a bat with a backwards grip, or stand on the opposite side of the plate when hitting.

They may also experience a moderate level of confusion, and frustration as they are unsure of how to make the two sides of their body work together leading to overall poor hand/foot-eye coordination skills.

Ambidexterity or mixed dominance and what this means for kids who use both hands to complete tasks like handwriting.

More visual processing activities

For even MORE information on eye-hand coordination and activities to use in your occupational therapy practice, you will want to join our free visual processing lab email series. It’s a 3-day series of emails that covers EVERYthing about visual processing. We take a closer look at visual skills and break things down, as well as covering the big picture of visual needs.
In the visual processing lab, you will discover how oculomotor skills like smooth pursuits make a big difference in higher level skills like learning and executive function. The best thing about this lab (besides all of the awesome info) is that it has a fun “lab” theme. I might have had too much fun with this one ūüôā
Join us in visual processing Lab! Where you won’t need Bunsen burners or safety goggles!
Free visual processing email lab to learn about visual skills needed in learning and reading.

Writing with Both Hands-What you Need to Know

Kids may write with both hands and have poor legibility or speed with handwriting.

Have you seen a child on your therapy caseload that writes with both hands? Writing with both hands can be a problem when it comes to handwriting legibility and efficiency. Have you ever wondered is my child a lefty or a righty? Or been asked if they are a lefty or righty and unable to answer? Have you noticed that your child seems to use both hands equally when writing? If so, your child may be experiencing mixed hand dominance patterns or cross-dominance, and this is why you are not sure if they are a lefty or a righty. Writing with both hands can have implications that affect handwriting. Read on for information on using both hands to write writing and what you need to know about mixed-handedness.

Here is more information on hand dominance and establishment of a preferred hand in functional activities.

 
 

Writing with both hands, wondering what this means for kids in learning and writing? This has great information on mixed dominance and laterality in kids.

Writing with Both Hands ‚ÄĒNow What?

First, it’s important to understand what is happening when a student uses both hands to write. Let’s discuss mixed dominance to begin. Here is more information about hand dominance and activities to promote laterality.

What is mixed dominance and what does this mean in child development? Read more about hand dominance and writing with both hands.

What is Mixed Dominance?

Mixed dominance refers to when a child does not demonstrate a strong preference for either the left side or the right side of the body for completion of activities, or clearly utilizes both hands for specific sets of activities. For example, a kiddo might throw with his left hand, but write with his right hand.

It should also be noted that children with mixed dominance often utilize both sides of the body equally, but poorly. When they fatigue, this leads to confusion with if they are left-side dominant or right-side dominant.

When Does Dominance Develop?

Dominance of one side of the body or the other is not expected until 5 years of age. Before the age of 5 years old, use of both hands is expected to a moderate degree. However, most children are showing a strong preference for one hand or the other by 3.5-4 years of age.

Determining Mixed Dominance

Dominance is typically determined through observation of the eyes, hands and feet and which one the child uses for task completion. For example, a child who is demonstrating mixed dominance may be right eye dominant, and left hand/foot dominant or left eye dominant, right hand dominant and left foot dominant, or any combination of these characteristics.

Therapists may utilize the Jordan Left/Right Reversal Questionnaire or clinical observations to help them determine mixed dominance. In a vision screen, the therapist can have the child pretend to be a pirate, and see what eye they close when looking through a tube/rolled paper. The eye that the child closes is the non-dominant or ‚Äúweak‚ÄĚ eye and the dominant or ‚Äústrong‚ÄĚ eye is the open one. If the ‚Äústrong‚ÄĚ eye does not match the hand preference the child has been showing, this is mixed dominance in action.

Be sure to watch this space, because tomorrow we’ll cover more about writing with both hands, ambidexterity, and mixed dominance.

For more information on visual screening, check out our vision screening packet:

Occupational Therapy Vision Screening Tool

Occupational Therapists screen for visual problems in order to determine how they may impact functional tasks. Visual screening can occur in the classroom setting, in inpatient settings, in outpatient therapy, and in early intervention or home care.
 
This visual screening tool was created by an occupational therapist and provides information on visual terms, frequently asked questions regarding visual problems, a variety of visual screening techniques, and other tools that therapists will find valuable in visual screenings.

 

 
This is a digital file. Upon purchase, you will be able to download the 10 page file and print off to use over and over again in vision screenings and in educating therapists, teachers, parents, and other child advocates or caregivers.
 

Mixed Dominance – Impact on Writing and Reading

Children who experience mixed dominance patterns are often delayed in reading and writing skills, along with poor left/right awareness.

Poor left/right awareness can affect their ability to accurately form letters and result in ‚Äėdyslexia‚Äô looking reversal patterns. The reversal patterns in letter formation and recognition may also lead to poor phonemic awareness, and later poor spelling, further delaying their reading and writing skills.

Reading left to right may also be a significant challenge as a result of poor eye teaming, as both sides of the brain are attempting to ‚Äėdominate‚Äô the skill. This struggle between the two sides of the brain results in poor organization of the information and retrieval of phonemic rules. Here is more information about visual processing and the skills that impact reading and learning.

Difficulties in these areas can be red flags of mixed dominance patterns that need to be addressed.

Final Notes on Mixed Dominance

Mixed dominance does not always seem like a big deal, but when left unaddressed your child may be left frustrated with their struggles in gross motor play, reading and writing.  Struggles in these areas significantly impact a child’s self-esteem and desire to participate in age appropriate activities. Fortunately, mixed dominance can be easily addressed through therapy.

Try this pouring and scooping activity to refine hand dominance in functional tasks.

More visual processing activities

For even MORE information on eye-hand coordination and activities to use in your occupational therapy practice, you will want to join our free visual processing lab email series. It’s a 3-day series of emails that covers EVERYthing about visual processing. We take a closer look at visual skills and break things down, as well as covering the big picture of visual needs.


In the visual processing lab, you will discover how oculomotor skills like smooth pursuits make a big difference in higher level skills like learning and executive function. The best thing about this lab (besides all of the awesome info) is that it has a fun “lab” theme. I might have had too much fun with this one ūüôā


Join us in visual processing Lab! Where you won’t need Bunsen burners or safety goggles!


Click here to learn more about Visual Processing Lab and to sign up.

 
Free visual processing email lab to learn about visual skills needed in learning and reading.
What is mixed dominance and what does this mean for kids?

Prone Extension Activities

Prone extension
Prone extension… this is a topic that comes up often when talking about occupational therapy activities! So often, we see kiddos who struggle with sensory modulation, core strength and core stability, body awareness, endurance, sensory processing needs. Prone extension activities can help strengthen and address other areas like those mentioned, and more. Below, you’ll find various prone extension activities that can be incorporated into occupational therapy treatment sessions and included in home programs.

Prone extension activities are great for adding vestibular input and proprioceptive sensory input through heavy work. There are so many other benefits of activities using prone extension in occupational therapy and in promoting development in kids!

Prone Extension Activities for Kids

Use the following prone extension activity ideas in games, play, and activities to improve skills like body awareness while providing proprioceptive and vestibular input. Many times, prone extension activities can be incorporated into learning activities too, or used to compliment other therapy goals such as visual memory or other visual perceptual needs.

What is prone extension?

Prone extension is that position you probably know as “superman pose”. When a child lies on their stomach and raises their arms and legs off the floor, they are assuming supine flexion. This positioning is an anti-gravity movement that promotes and requires an both sensory systems and motor skills to work in an integrated manner. A prone extension position can occur in other locations beyond the floor. A therapy ball, mat, swing, etc. can all be valuable tools in promoting and eliciting this movement pattern.

When assuming a sustained prone extension position position, there is a fluent and effective use of both the inner AND outer core musculature.

Observation of this position as well as other motor patterns are typically observed during an occupational therapy evaluation in order to assess strength, sensory and motor systems, body awareness, motor planning, bilateral coordination, as well as other areas.

Prone extension activities are a great way to encourage vestibular input as well as other areas mentioned above. Additionally, a prone extension activity can be an easy way to add proprioceptive input to a child seeking heavy pressure. To encourage longer prone extension positioning, try adding additional activities such as games, puzzles, or reaching activities while in the prone position to encourage the hands and arms to reach forward for longer periods of time.

Examples of Prone Extension

Amazon affiliate links are included below.
Adding prone positioning into play can be easy. Try some of the ideas listed below:
1. Use a scooter board. Ask the child to hold onto a rope with strong arms as they are pulled down a hallway. To further this activity, ask the child to pull themselves along a length of space while lying in prone on the scooter board. Add additional resistance by using the scooter board on a carpeted surface.
2. While lying on a therapy ball or bolster, as the child to place bean bags or other objects into a bucket that is placed on a raised surface such as a scooter board. Move the scooter and bucket to various positions to encourage additional reach and extension. Once a bean bag makes it into a bucket, go in for a high five! What an encouraging way to promote that prone extension!
3. While lying on a mat or other surface, ask the child to toss rings onto a target area.
4. Using a chair or ottoman (couch cushions on the floor work well, too), show the child how to lay on their belly. Some children will want to keep their toes on the floor to steady themselves. Others may want to lift their legs and feet for additional vestibular input. Ask the child to reach out and pop bubbles.
5. For the child that appreciates vestibular input, ask them to lay their belly on an office chair. Using their hands, they can push away from a wall to make the chair move backwards. Other children may like this activity on a scooter board.
6. Ask kids to lie on their stomachs as they use straws to blow cotton balls or craft pom poms into a target. What an exercise in oral motor skills and breathing, too. Deep breaths in can promote the stability needed to sustain a prone extended position. However, breathing out in a lengthy, slow breath to move those cotton balls provides a chance to really engage those inner and outer core muscles.
7. Kids can hit targets (both high and low) using a pool noodle while in a prone position. Reaching forward with those hands to hit targeted areas promotes eye-hand coordination too while really engaging that core!
8. Add a home program with fun exercises that promote posturing, movement challenges, and activities.

 
The options are endless when it comes to adding vestibular and proprioceptive input through prone extension positioning and activities. Think out of the box to come up with fun and unique ideas that provide heavy work input while addressing all of the other areas kids so often need!
What are your favorite prone extension activities for kids?
Try these prone extension activities to help kids develop bilateral coordination, strength, motor planning, and other skills while getting sensory input in the form of vestibular and proprioception.

Thank you! More Letter Formation Tips

That’s it! Your downloadable straight line letters therapy slide deck file should be delivered to your email inbox shortly.

>>> Add it to virtual therapy activities and home programming, combining them with hands-on activities, writing lists, and practicing letters on paper.

Looking for more tools to use in teaching letter formation? Try these ideas:

Free Letter Formation Slide Deck– This is another slide deck that has a scribble theme to work on letter formation. Kids won’t be scribbling those letters, though! They will be working on fine motor skills, visual perception, gross motor, and more…all needed to write letters clearly!

Writing Trays– Use items found in the home like an outdoor sandbox, a low tray of rice, or dry noodles.

Shaving Cream on the Table

Lowercase Letter Formation Activities

10 Ways to Teach Letter Formation

Letter Reversals

Fine Motor Alphabet and Play Dough

Magnetic Alphabet and Spoons Game

Here are more teletherapy activities to use in virtual OT sessions

Teletherapy activities for kids

Work on fine motor skills in teletherapy

Teletherapy games and worksheets

Problems finding the email with this download?

If you don’t see it right away, give it about 15 minutes. If you still don’t see it, be sure to check your SPAM folder or “other” folders. Run a search in your email to check for an email from The OT Toolbox. Some email networks, like those using an email ending with .org, .edu, .net, etc. may have this email blocked.

Arrive on this page by accident? Want your copy of the free “scribble day” occupational therapy screen deck to use in therapy sessions? Go here to access your copy of this letter formation/fine motor/gross motor letter formation teletherapy session.