Apple Visual Perception Skills Pack

$5.00

Over a dozen amazing apple visual perception activities and printable pages for your back to school fall apple theme!

Teachers and therapists love thematic lesson and treatment plans.  Themes help streamline learning, keep students motivated, and provide multimodal learning opportunities.

Visual perception is the cornerstone of reading, writing, and math skills. Without good visual perception, students will struggle to acquire basic and higher level academic skills. More and more students suffer from learning disabilities than ever. Jump in quickly and early to strengthen these skills.

This visual perceptual skills pack works on critical skills such as: visual scanning, visual discrimination, fine motor skills, visual memory, eye hand coordination, pencil control, figure ground, visual closure, and form constancy.  These reusable print and go pages will teach critical skills, keeping students engaged while practicing.

Descripción

Working on visual perceptual skills and need engaging activities in an apple theme? Another great don-for-you packet to add to your “toolbox”.  This packet includes a dozen different types of visual perceptual pages to address key skills.

What is visual perception and why is it important?  

Visual perception is being able to look at something and make sense of it.  Items have to be “perceived” in the correct way for motor output, reading, following directions, self care, and just about everything we do. That jacket that is inside out?  It takes more than just fine motor skills to  right it.  The eyes and brain need to “see” that the jacket is inside out, where the problem stems from, then use motor skills to correct it. 

Visual perception is different from visual acuity.  Visual acuity is the ability to see objects.  The lens, cornea, and optic nerve work together to see things clearly.  A person can have 20/20 acuity and terrible visual perception, or terrible acuity, but great perception.  Be sure to rule out visual acuity issues before addressing visual perceptual concerns.  

Visual perception is classified into different categories:

  • Visual Attention: The ability to focus on important visual information and filter out unimportant background information
  • Visual Discrimination: The ability to determine differences or similarities in objects based on size, color, shape, etc
  • Visual Memory: The ability to recall visual traits of a form or object
  • Visual Spatial Relationships: Understanding the relationships of objects within the environment
  • Visual Sequential-Memory: The ability to recall a sequence of objects in the correct order
  • Visual Figure Ground: The ability to locate something in a busy background
  • Visual Form Constancy: The ability to know that a form or shape is the same, even if it has been made smaller/larger or has been turned around
  • Visual Closure: The ability to recognize a form or object when part of the picture is missing

Your student might struggle in one, two or all of the above areas.  Screeners and visual perceptual tests can give you insight into your students’ strengths and weaknesses.

Skills addressed using these visual perception worksheets

  • Apple Match – Look at the apples. Each apple has only one match. Color the matching apples the same, or use small objects like beads, craft pom poms, or other items to match the apples.  Target skills: Visual scanning, visual discrimination, eye-hand coordination, visual memory, fine motor skills
  • Apple Bites – Each apple has a bite taken out of it! Use a pencil to draw the missing piece. Target skills: Visual closure, visual discrimination, eye-hand coordination, visual memory, fine motor skills, pencil control 
  • Apple Directions – Follow the directions to complete the apple tasks. Target skills: Visual closure, visual discrimination, viisual attention, visual memory, visual closure, visual figure-ground, following directions, pencil control, fine motor skills
  • Apple Directions (two pages) – Color each apple according to the direction of the fruit.  Target skills: Form constancy, visual discrimination, eye-hand coordination, visual memory, fine motor skills, scanning, pencil control 
  • Apple Tracking – Move through each line of the grid, starting at the upper left hand side. Color, mark off with an X, or place an object on each of the items. Move to the next row, continuing through the whole grid.  Target skills: Form constancy, visual discrimination, eye-hand coordination, visual memory, fine motor skills, scanning, pencil control 
  • Apple Match – Find all of the matching apples. Color the matching apples the same color. Mark the matching apples with different shapes, an X, a circle, or use dot markers. Use matching small objects like beads, craft pom poms, or other items to mark the apples.  Target skills – Form constancy, visual discrimination, figure ground, eye-hand coordination, visual memory, fine motor skills, scanning, pencil control 
  • Apple Sort – Look at the pile of apples in the picture. Sort out what shapes make up the picture.  It might be two, three, or four. Color the pictures for additional fun.  Target skills: Form constancy, visual discrimination, figure ground, eye-hand coordination, visual memory, fine motor skills, scanning, pencil control 
  • Apple Match – Look at the apples. Each apple has only one match. Color the matching apples the same, connect the matching apples with a line, or use similar objects to mark the pictures.  Target skills:  Target skills: Form constancy, visual discrimination, figure ground, eye-hand coordination, visual memory, fine motor skills, scanning, pencil control 
  • Apple Match (two pages) –  Look at the apples in the COLOR KEY AREA. Use a different crayon to color each apple in the key, so that each apple is assigned a different color. Follow the line with your finger or your eyes. When you reach  an apple, color it the color you assigned that apple in the Color Key.  Target skills: Scanning, pencil control, visual memory, form constancy, fine motor skills, eye hand coordination, visual discrimination.

Other skills addressed while completing these visual perception printables:

  • Fine motor – grasping pattern, wrist stability, intrinsic hand muscle development, pencil control
  • Bilateral coordination – hand dominance, using “helper hand”, crossing midline
  • Proprioception – pressure on paper, grip on writing tool
  • Strength – shoulder, elbow, wrist, hand, core, head control
  • Executive function/behavior – following directions, attention, focus, sequencing, planning, task completion, frustration tolerance
  • Social function – working together in a group, problem solving, sharing materials and space, turn taking, talking about the activity

Other ideas for these Visual Perception Apple Printables

  • Laminate the page for reusability. This saves on resources, and many learners love to write with markers!
  • Print in black and white or color for different levels of difficulty
  • Cut the shapes and make a matching game instead of using a writing tool to draw lines
  • Talk about the items, describe their characteristics, and give context clues to help your learner understand why certain pictures match
  • Have students copy some of these designs to add to the visual motor element
  • Try different writing utensils. This is not only motivating, but some learners work better with markers as they glide easier on paper. Did you know that golf sized pencils promote more of a tripod grasp than traditional long pencils? Try having your learner color with one inch crayons to enhance their grasp
  • Enlarge the task for beginning writers who need more writing space
  • Shrink the task for older learners who need to learn to write smaller
  • Have students write on a slant board, lie prone on the floor with the page in front to build shoulder stability, or supine with the page taped under the table.
  • Project this page onto a smart board for students to come to the board and write in big lines
  • More or less prompting may be needed to grade activity to make it easier or harder
  • Take away the motor component of the task to isolate visual perceptual skills
  • Make this part of a larger lesson plan including gross motor, sensory, social, executive function, or other fine motor skills