The OT Toolbox

Super Simple Visual Tracking Tool

Visual tracking is a skill kids need for reading, handwriting, and learning! Visual tracking activities can help kids strengthen this visual processing skill and in easy and fun ways. We made a Visual Tracking Tool that is an easy DIY occupational therapy activity. It is super easy to make and fun to play with, making it a great way to work on visual tracking skills.  We shared an easy way to practice visual tracking with bottle caps not too long ago, and this visual tracking tool will be anoth…


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THE SENSORY LIFESTYLE HANDBOOK
When working with sensory kids and their families, one of the number one questions that is asked is—is this a sensory meltdown or a tantrum? It’s often hard to tell the difference between the two, and takes some detective work to figure out which one it is. Determining if a sensory meltdown is occurring is especially difficult because sensory thresholds for these children can vary day to day. So often we hear, "Is it sensory or a behavior" that is causing an action in a child. Here are the clues to help you discern the difference.

For more information on sensory processing, you'll want to grab our free sensory processing disorder information packet. This is a handy printable designed to better understand SPD and what that looks like in our kids.

How to know if a chil is having a sensory meltdown or tantrum. These clues will tell the difference.

Behaviors of Sensory Meltdowns and Tantrums Look Similar

The challenge in determining whether behaviors are the result of a sensory meltdown or a tantrum, is that the child’s behaviors in both instances, are usually the same.

Behaviors that are observed during both a sensory meltdown and a tantrum may include:
Screaming
Hitting
Kicking
Name calling
Hiding or avoidance
Crying

The difference between a meltdown and tantrum however, can be often times, be found in the events prior to the behaviors.

For information on sensory play ideas, you'll find a lot here on The OT Toolbox.

Tantrums

Tantrums are usually in response to the child not receiving a want/desire out of a situation, or not achieving a goal as they had planned. In these instances behaviors typically occur for an audience, and may cease when the child has achieved their goal. This may be a way of testing boundaries with the authority figure in the situation.

Tantrums can usually be resolved with consequences, reminders of the boundaries, removal from the situation, or distraction to the upset child. Children are also not typically emotionally drained after a tantrum and can resume their routine with ease. This is not necessarily the case when a sensory meltdown occurs.



What is a sensory meltdown and how to tell if a child's behaviors and actions are a sensory meltdown or a tantrum


Sensory Meltdowns

Sensory Meltdowns are the result of sensory overload, and reaction to the big feelings that overloads cause.

When in the throes of the sensory meltdown, the child is not able to control their reactions, behaviors, or emotions.  These episodes may also leave the child inconsolable, even when distraction or preferred items are offered, or even when the parent ‘gives’ into what the child is demanding.

 Meltdowns may appear happen without a trigger, or may be in response to an event that seems otherwise innocuous to the parent.

The main clue that the behaviors the child is exhibiting is sensory meltdown related is that the behavior does not achieve a want, need or goal.

In the case of a sensory meltdown, having a set of strategies available through use of a sensory diet can help with sensory overload, big feelings, and reactions.

Clues a Behavior is a Sensory Meltdown

Reaction to event, feeling or overload of sensory input
Is not to achieve a want, need, or goal
Continues even without an audience
Ends only when the child has calmed down and the feelings are out
The child is very tired after the meltdown or appears ‘spent’
The child may feel embarrassment or shame as a result of their actions—typically this is seen in older children.

These signs can show up at home, in the community, or in the classroom. Here are strategies for using a sensory diet in the classroom.

What can Trigger a Sensory Meltdown? 

Sometimes, we can see a meltdown coming, and other times it seems to hit out of the blue. This is particularly true of children who are a little bit older, and understand what is acceptable and what is not. Because of this, parent’s often report that their children do GREAT at school, and then lose it at home.


Some clues that it might be a meltdown include: 

Being over tired or hungry
Illness or general unwellness—allergies can be a trigger to this sense of general unwellness. This may include food allergies or sensitivities.
“Holding it together” for long periods of time—going to school, camp, play dates, etc.
Change in routines—extra day off of school, vacation, or parent traveling. Essentially, anything outside of the child’s daily routine being off may result in a sensory overload and meltdown.

It may take several hours, or several days before a meltdown occurs as a result of these triggers. As a result, it can appear as though there is no cause for the meltdown until the events prior to the event are examined. If you go back far enough into the past few days, a trigger is usually able to be found.

Whether it’s a tantrum, or a meltdown, behavior is a direct form of communication from kids to adults about what is going on in their life. Knowing the difference between the two can lead to recognition of triggers and patterns, implementation of prevention strategies and successful emotional recovery in both situations.

Create a sensory lifestyle to address sensory meltdowns or tantrums in a way that fits into the daily life of a child with sensory needs.

Tools for Sensory Meltdowns

The Sensory Lifestyle Handbook is a guidebook in strategies to help with sensory meltdowns. Taking the specific and individualized activities that make up a Sensory Diet and transitioning them into a lifestyle of sensory modifications, strategies, and techniques is a Sensory Lifestyle!

This book is for therapists, parents, teachers, or anyone who works with kids with sensory needs.

If you struggle with creating a sensory diet that WORKS...
If you are tired of trying sensory tools that just don't seem to fit within a child's busy day...
If you are overwhelmed and don't know where to start with understanding sensory processing...
If you are a therapist struggling to set up sensory programs that are carried out and followed through at home and in the classroom...
If you are a teacher looking for help with regulation, attention, or sensory meltdowns and need ideas that mesh within the classroom schedule...
If you are looking for sensory techniques that kids WANT to use...
If you are striving to create a sensory lifestyle that meets the needs of a child and family...


The Sensory Lifestyle Handbook is for you!




Potty training can be a jungle. Knowing what to expect when starting potty training can be challenging for parents. Even seasoned parents can struggle when it comes to potty training and there's a good reason why; Every child is different! And here's the thing: Because every child is so different when it comes to interests, strengths, difficulties, and needs, potty training incentives can be a challenge too. Potty training rewards can be helpful when the child's motivations are included in toilet training. Maybe you've tried potty training charts before. Perhaps you are struggling to teach the basics of potty training, or are working on a child staying dry overnight. Today, I've got a motivating potty training incentive that can be just the tool to address a variety of toileting challenges.  

Use potty training incentives like reward charts and potty training bracelets to help kids learn steps of toilet training.

Potty Training Incentive

First, let's talk about what a potty training incentive is and looks like. You've probably seen a potty training reward chart before. A potty training sticker chart can be just the visual that helps kids progress from making it to the potty in time to remembering to stop and go to the bathroom when playing (and before it's too late). Other kids use reward charts for washing hands after using the restroom or wiping completely. A visual reward chart like a sticker chart can address a wide variety of potty training issues. 

Reward programs can be used in the home or while on-the-go while out and about in the community. A potty training visual chart can be used to work on many goal areas. 

Many potty training incentives offer a reward for that persistence and patience needed in potty training. Sticker charts can be just the tool to help kids feel special and confident during the potty training process. After the kiddo achieves a goal like sitting on the toilet or making it to the potty in time, they can add a sticker to the chart. After a determined number of stickers have been added to the chart, a reward is earned. 

Kud Banz is a potty training reward system that helps kids learn steps of potty training through positive reinforcement and an interactive incentive.

Toileting Reward Program That Kids will Love

I recently came across a potty training incentive program that I fell in love with. The Kudo Banz system works a lot like a sticker chart reward. However, the difference is that kids can wear a bracelet to help remind kids of their goals. They can earn Kudos for various aspects of potty training, keeping them motivated to turn positive behaviors and actions into habits. 

Kids will love this motivating potty training program that helps behaviors turn into habits in a meaningful way.


Use a potty training book like the Kudo banz potty party book to teach kids aspects of toileting.

Potty Training Book with a Twist

Affiliate links are included in this post.

Part of the Potty Starter Pack by Kudo Banz, is a colorful and fun storybook called "The Adventures of Drago and George and the Potty Party". This book gets kids and parents excited about beginning potty training by describing an adventure and a fun "potty party". In the book, the characters discover how to earn kudos by completing individualized challenges. 

A potty party is a rewarding potty training incentive that kids will love.

As we all know, kids are so different. What works for one child may not work for another. That's why the Kudos that can be modified based on your child's needs, strengths, and interests are really successful. 

For special potty training seats based on needs of the child, check out our recent post on Potty Training Seats for Special Needs.

Kids will love this potty training incentive program that teaches toileting through positive interactions.

Using a bracelet and themed charms, kids can add a "kudo", or charm clip, after achieving goals. They can work through the various aspects of potty training, taking kids from walking into the bathroom and sitting on the potty, all the way to staying dry overnight. 

Use Kudo Banz to teach kids potty training incentives by receiving kudos for reaching personal goals.

This potty training incentive program is meaningful and motivating to kids.


Kids can use the bands and the clips to mark progress for toileting aspects such as: 

  • Sitting on the potty
  • Going pee in the potty
  • Going poop in the potty
  • Learning to wipe all by themselves
  • Remembering to wash hands after going potty
  • Staying dry for specific amounts of time, such as from breakfast to snack time, etc.
  • Staying dry at nap-time
  • Staying dry overnight
Teach kids potty training with a meaningful and motivating potty training incentive.

A potty training incentive that kids will love

Focusing on the Positive When Potty Training

Because toilet training requires so much patience, it's important to stay positive. As parents, this can be HARD! An accident on the floor again? Wet pants for the third time today? It can be frustrating to work through potty training challenges when you've practiced and practiced the aspects of toileting. 

Make potty training meaningful and motivating with a toileting reward system like a sticker chart on the wrist.

That's why using positive reinforcement such as the reward charms that Kudo Banz offer is so important. It helps kids stay motivated because they feel excited to have that kudo on their bracelet, and with them at all times. It's a great way to stay encouraged to try again because they can see, touch, and feel the evidence that they did something positive. 

Kudo Banz are fun and creative potty training incentives that kids will love.

Having that bracelet right on their arm makes staying focused on incentives rewarding because kudos happen right in the moment and even when out and about. Kids can add a kudo to their bracelet when using a public restroom and see the evidence of a bathroom win...and boost their self-confidence in potty training. 

Kids can pick their potty training reward with a meaningful and motivating theme.

Interactive Potty Training Reward
The thing about Kudo Banz that kids will absolutely love, besides the themed Kudo charms that they can pick, is the reward. Using an app, kids can use their reward Kudo in an interactive way to keep kids interested in their goals and motivated to earn more. 

Potty training reward charms are an incentive to accomplish personal goals and toileting goals, leading to more independence.


Take it a step further:
Kudo Banz is nice because kids can benefit from the motivating and interactive factor, and even take habits a step further and be used to work on a variety of goals. Things such as picky eating, doing chores, following directions, doing homework...and many more areas that can be difficult to instill in kids can be addressed with this motivating reward tool. 


Add Kudo Banz to your therapy toolbox! Grab a set here.
When it comes to potty training and toileting in general, there is a LOT of information out there. And, if you ask around for suggestions for the best potty training seats, you will probably get a variety of answers. It can be overwhelming to weed through all of the potty seats out there on the market and in the local box store toddler aisle. The difficulty compounds when you consider potty training with special needs children. Today, I wanted to pull together a list of potty training seats out there on the market that are perfect for special needs kids, as well as typically developing kids. These potty training chairs help address the underlying needs that kids might struggle with when it comes to potty training. These potty training seats and supports can be the tools needed to address a variety of underlying needs when it comes to getting started with potty training.

Here's the thing: it can be difficult to make suggestions or come up with a comprehensive list that covers ALL of the special needs out there. (That's where your occupational therapy evaluation or equiptment analysis will come into play!) BUT, I can definitely address some of the more common potty training seats out on the market and address the underlying areas that they can address and hopefully target a best fit.

These recommendations for potty training seats are guided by development and great for kids of all needs. Use these potty training seats as suggestions when starting potty training for toddlers or preschoolers.






Potty Training Seats are Not One-Size Fits All!

Let's face it. There is no one-size-fits-all approach when it comes to potty training. Because of the vast differences in in kids development, interests, motivation, physical or special needs, potty training can be a challenge to know where to start. This list is hopefully a start for addressing some of the areas kids need for successful potty training.


Portable Seat- This type of seat is great for kids who need a smaller opening on the toilet. Kids of all needs benefit from a larger seat area when first potty training. This one is nice because it can be carried from place to place when on the go outside of the home. Just fold it up and place in it's carrying bag. Using a portable seat can make it easy to add interests when beginning potty training. Add interests such as special toys and items to make sitting motivating.

Squatty Potty- The squatty potty is a helpful way to provide a more stable base of support while sitting on the toilet seat. Kids can place their feet on the support that curves around the toilet base and improve balance while sitting. This base of support can help kids who need extra support or have balance needs. The Step and Go stool is another, more inexpensive option. Adding a supportive base can help calm nerves of unsupported sitting. Children can use a wider base of support with this type of stool.


Potty Training Chart- While this isn't a potty training seat, a training chart can be used to promote extended sitting on a potty chair, and to allow kids the ability to build up patience to sit and wait on a potty chair. Starting out by using a potty training chart to encourage kids just to go to and sit on the potty seat is a great start for younger kids or those who need to accommodate for sensory needs. A visual tool such as a potty training chart can be a practical way to reinforce individual skills that make up the process of toilet training. The nice thing about toilet training charts is that they can be individualized, based on the child's needs. Some kids with special needs or sensory needs may be afraid of walking into the bathroom. A sticker chart can be one strategy to address that aspect given various modifications or activities that can help address needs.


Step Stool with Handles- Having a handle can help little ones who struggle with balance or feeling unstable when sitting on a regular sized toilet seat. This one has a step stool that provides a base of support through the feet.


Toilet Seat with Pee Guard- This seat insert has handles and slight curvature to the sides of the toilet seat ring, providing support and a sense of stability when seated on a regular size toilet. The urine guard is helpful for both boys and girls.

Three-in-one Potty Training Seat- As a mom of four, this 3-in-one potty training seat is a favorite. It goes with kids from the toddler stage when a smaller, floor potty chair is helpful in training. The ring insert can then be used when transitioning to a regular sized toilet. Finally, the seat forms a step stool for using either on the toilet or when washing hands. This is a convenient toilet training seat for families! This potty training system is great for the child who appreciates consistency.



 Ring Reducer- There are many styles of toilet seat ring reducers out there and they serve a great purpose; to reduce the size of the opening on the toilet seat, allowing for small kids to feel more safe and secure when sitting on the toilet. This is a good transition seat to a regular sized toilet. For kids who struggle with coordination and balance, this ring reducer can be just the ticket to potty training success.
Disposable Seat Covers- These seat covers are convenient for kids who tend to grab the toilet seat when sitting on a regular-sized toilet. When out and about in the community, it can be helpful for some kids to use a seat cover that is more effective than just using toilet paper. Some of our kiddos can't tolerate sitting without holding onto the seat or just can't follow the directions to "not hold onto the seat".

These special needs potty training seats can be a guide to getting started with potty training for special needs kids.

Physical Limitations and Special Needs Toilet Training

While these potty training seat options just cover the surface of potty training, it's important to remember to consider the underlying and developmental aspects of potty training. The therapist's perspective can play an important part in identifying any developmental or transitioning needs when it comes to potty training. While there are many more specific tools that can be used with special needs toilet training as well as typically developing kids, these are just some of the basics. Remember that there truly is not a one-size-fits-all aspect for toileting. Some of our kids with more physical special needs or developmental considerations may benefit from a more extensive and supportive seating system. That's where the occupational therapist comes into play with identifying needs and tools that will promote independence and function.

Use these potty training seats for special needs kids when beginning the potty training process with kids of all needs.

Potty Training Seats for Physical Needs

Toileting Seat System- There are many toileting systems on the market that address physical needs. Seating systems are intended to  promote positioning, safety, mobility, transfers, function, and quality of life of the individual. Look for a system that meets the budget and can efficiently accommodate various needs such as toileting, showering/bathing, hygiene, etc. 

Systems can come with a variety of ajustements and supports. Consider the need or use of the following supports:

Headrest
Backrest
Armrests
Lateral back supports
Harness
Seat belt
Tray
Anterior support
Hip guides
Abductor
Urine deflector or guard
Calf supports
Lower extremity lateral supports
Ankle straps
Footrest
Tilt in space (backward/forward)
Recline
Height adjustments
Push handles (for caregiver support)
Wheeled base
Molded and Foam cushions
Pan/adaptability for use over a toilet or as a stand-alone toilet chair

Support Station for Toileting- A standing support station can be used in assisted hygiene or assisted toileting. The standing station can be a support to transfers and can be beneficial t clothing management, self-care, skin care, and undergarment changing. 

The support station is a helpful tool for improving function and dignity of clients as can perform aspects of toileting, as well as participate in self-care. This is a means for reducing diaper use as well, further improving dignity. Additionally, support stations are a tool for improved safety of caregivers. When clients stand at a standing support frame, they are truly building strength, endurance and self-care skills in a natural manner within the occupation of toileting. 

For More information on Potty Training 

Watch for information coming soon to this space on the upcoming Toilet Training Book! It's about to be released and is your go-to resource on potty training based on development and individualized needs. This book was created by occupational therapists and physical therapists who are experts in the field of child development, sensory processing, motor skills, and function. 

Coming soon! The Toilet Training Book!






Attention is a hot topic when it comes to learning! There's more than meets the eye when it comes to visual attention, however. Visual attention is an area of visual processing that is more than just focusing on a task or leaning activity. Visual attention is a visual skill necessary for noticing details, adjusting to patterns, reading, and so much more of the giant visual processing umbrella. Read on to discover what is visual attention and how this visual skill impacts so much of what we do.

For our kids who are challenged to visually observe their environment, or who struggle to demonstrate visual tracking in reading or other learning experiences, activities designed to promote smooth pursuits and eye movement can be helpful. The visual activities listed here can be helpful in addressing the smooth pursuits of visual input. Visual pursuits or tacking is an oculomotor skill that is necessary part of visual processing. Read on for various eye exercise that can be done in fun ways as a part of occupational therapy geared toward visual processing skills.

These activities to improve smooth visual pursuits are needed to improve visual tracking needed for reading and visual processing.






Activities to improve smooth visual pursuits


First, let’s cover what visual pursuits are and how they impact a child’s learning.

Visual skills like visual tracking, or smooth visual pursuits are a visual processing skill that allow us to perceive and retrieve visual information. This is an essential part of reading and learning.

What are visual pursuits?


Visual pursuits are another term for visual tracking. Visual tracking is an oculomotor skill that is essential for learning, reading, and so many tasks we perform. Here is more information about visual tracking. You will also love checking out these activities to improve visual tracking.

Visual processing skills have a huge impact on learning. In fact, it is one of the visual skills that can impact learning in a way that isn’t always directly observable.

Visual skills like visual tracking, or smooth visual pursuits are a visual processing skill that allow us to perceive and retrieve visual information. This is an essential part of reading and learning.

Want to learn more about HOW visual pursuits and other aspects of visual processing impact learning (in a really big way)? Scroll below to join our free visual processing lab. It's a 3 day email series where you will learn SO much about visual processing and how it impacts everything, but especially learning and cognitive skills.

Visual tracking activites are needed for learning and everything we do! These activities to improve visual pursuits can be used in occupational therapy treatment sessions or part of vision therapy activities.

Activities to improve visual pursuits


These visual tracking activities are easy and creative ways to work on eye movement and smooth eye movements. Kids can perform these activities as part of a therapy program and while working on functional skills within an occupation.

1. Relaxing breathing eye stretches- This visual tracking activity is a way to work on smooth pursuits in a very mindful way. Just like yoga brings awareness to the body and a sense of being present, this eye stretch activity is a great way to calm a class during a busy school day.

Combine slow and deep breathing with deliberate eye movements. Kids can watch and follow directions to take deep breaths combined with slowly looking in a single direction. As they look up and breath or look to the left and breath, kids can even use this activity as a coping strategy.

2. Flashlight Tag- Use a flashlight to help kids follow a target in various directions. Try a circle, uppercase letter “H”, triangle, straight/diagonal lines, etc. To make this activity more fun, try adding a deflated balloon to the top of the flashlight. Encourage kids to keep their face steady as they use just the eyes to follow the light.

3. Craft Stick Puppets-Create small craft stick characters puppets to make a visual cue as a visual prompt for follow movement patterns. These barnyard animal puppets make a great DIY puppet tool for a visual pursuit and tracking activity.

4. Marble run activities- There are many marble run products on the market that provide an opportunity for improving smooth pursuit of the eyes. Here are DIY marble run activities that make a great activity in themselves for kids. We love to add slow moving items to marble run games too, to provide a slower object for visually tracking, encouraging smooth pursuits of the eyes. Encourage kids to keep their face steady while using their eyes only to watch the item fall through the marble run.

5. Roll a ball up a slanted surface and ask the child to keep their eyes on the ball! Some ideas include creating a sloped surface with a poster board and books. Simply roll a small ball slowly up the ramp and kids can watch the ball as it rolls. Also try having the child to sit in front of the ramp and be in charge of rolling the ball. Mark off where the ball should reach and stop so the child works on graded movement at the same time. Sitting in front of the ramp encourages visual convergence and binocular fusion as well. This activity works well with a large ball such as a kick ball and a sidewalk ramp, too.

6. Double Light Eye Tag- Use two different colored lights (light-topped pens work well). Flash one color on and then the other. Kids can move their eyes from color to color or follow directions to look at the two lights when they change.

Hopefully, these activities to improve visual pursuits is a helpful addition to your therapy toolbox. Use these strategies to work on various visual processing skills and oculomotor skills.

More visual processing activities

For even MORE visual tracking and pursuit activities to use in your occupational therapy practice, you will want to join our free visual processing lab email series. It's a 3-day series of emails that covers EVERYthing about visual processing. We take a closer look at visual skills and break things down, as well as covering the big picture of visual needs.

In the visual processing lab, you will discover how oculomotor skills like smooth pursuits make a big difference in higher level skills like learning and executive function. The best thing about this lab (besides all of the awesome info) is that it has a fun "lab" theme. I might have had too much fun with this one :)

Join us in visual processing Lab! Where you won't need Bunsen burners or safety goggles!

Click here to learn more about Visual Processing Lab and to sign up.

Free visual processing email lab to learn about visual skills needed in learning and reading.



More visual tracking activities you will like:





Visual pursuits visual tracking activities to help kids with the visual skills needed for learning, reading, and everything they do!
Visual processing impacts everything we do! When kids struggle with things like writing on the lines, managing buttons, catching a ball, or finding a missing shoe in a messy room...visual processing skills are at play. The thing is, the components of visual processing are more than meets the eye (literally)! Visual processing involves several areas like oculomotor function, visual perception, and visual-motor skills. These underlying areas make all the difference in skills like handwriting, fine motor skills, learning, reading, functional tasks...everything! 

What if I told you that there is a new resource available through The OT Toolbox. The Visual Processing Lab is here! It's a short email series that covers everything you need to know about visual processing. And you can join us!
Visual Scanning is a component of visual processing that is crucial to everything we do! From taking in visual information, to using that information in making decisions and enabling actions...visual scanning is an oculomotor skill that is sometimes an area of difficulty for those struggling with visual processing skills. Below, you will find information about visual scanning, including what this oculomotor control component looks like, what visual scanning really means, and why scanning as a visual skill is needed for learning, functional tasks, social emotional skills, executive function and other cognitive abilities, and just about everything we do!

To work on visual scanning in the classroom or clinic, you may want to grab this free 17 page visual perception worksheet packet that promote oculomotor skills like visual scanning as well as visual perceptual skills!
Visual perception is an area that drives so much of what we do. For kids who struggle with visual perceptual skills, so many areas are impacted. Visual perception impacts reading, writing, learning, comprehension, visual motor skills (including copying written materials), fine motor work, gross motor skills, eye-hand coordination, and even social emotional skills! It's amazing how this one area can impact so many areas of a life and functioning. Because some f our popular free visual perception worksheets have been used by so many therapists, I wanted to pull these resources together into an easy to access visual perception worksheet packet! This is it! Your 17 page packet of free visual perception worksheets can be accessed below.

Eye-hand coordination development typically occurs through movement, beginning at a very young age. The visual components of oculomotor skills (how the eyes move) include visual fixation, visual tracking (or smooth pursuits), and visual scanning. These beginning stages of child development play a big part down the road in taking in visual information and using it to perform motor tasks. 

Wondering about a child who uses both hands to write or perform tasks? Maybe you know a child who uses both hands equally and with equal skill. Perhaps your child uses one hand for specific tasks and their other hand for other tasks. How do you know if your child is ambidextrous or if they are showing signs of mixed dominance? This post will explain a little more about ambidexterity as well as mixed dominance and what it means in motor skills.

For a few fun hand dominance activities, try these ideas to help kids establish a preferred hand.

Sensory Meltdown or Tantrum: Which one is it?
Sensory Meltdown or Tantrum: Which one is it?

When working with sensory kids and their families, one of the number one questions that is asked is—is this a sensory meltdown or a tantrum? It’s often hard to tell the difference between the two, and takes some detective work to figure out which one it is. Determining if a sensory meltdown is occu…
Potty Training Incentive (That Kids will LOVE)
Potty Training Incentive (That Kids will LOVE)

Potty training can be a jungle. Knowing what to expect when starting potty training can be challenging for parents. Even seasoned parents can struggle when it comes to potty training and there's a good reason why; Every child is different! And here's the thing: Because every child is so di…
Potty Training Seats for Special Needs
Potty Training Seats for Special Needs

When it comes to potty training and toileting in general, there is a LOT of information out there. And, if you ask around for suggestions for the best potty training seats, you will probably get a variety of answers. It can be overwhelming to weed through all of the potty seats out there on the mar…
What is Visual Attention?
What is Visual Attention?

Attention is a hot topic when it comes to learning! There's more than meets the eye when it comes to visual attention, however. Visual attention is an area of visual processing that is more than just focusing on a task or leaning activity. Visual attention is a visual skill necessary for notici…
Activities to improve smooth visual pursuits
Activities to improve smooth visual pursuits

For our kids who are challenged to visually observe their environment, or who struggle to demonstrate visual tracking in reading or other learning experiences, activities designed to promote smooth pursuits and eye movement can be helpful. The visual activities listed here can be helpful in address…
Free Visual Processing Lab
Free Visual Processing Lab

Visual processing impacts everything we do! When kids struggle with things like writing on the lines, managing buttons, catching a ball, or finding a missing shoe in a messy room...visual processing skills are at play. The thing is, the components of visual processing are more than meets the eye (…
What is Visual Scanning
What is Visual Scanning

Visual Scanning is a component of visual processing that is crucial to everything we do! From taking in visual information, to using that information in making decisions and enabling actions...visual scanning is an oculomotor skill that is sometimes an area of difficulty for those struggling with v…
Free Visual Perception Packet
Free Visual Perception Packet

Visual perception is an area that drives so much of what we do. For kids who struggle with visual perceptual skills, so many areas are impacted. Visual perception impacts reading, writing, learning, comprehension, visual motor skills (including copying written materials), fine motor work, gross mot…
Development of Eye-Hand Coordination
Development of Eye-Hand Coordination

Eye-hand coordination development typically occurs through movement, beginning at a very young age. The visual components of oculomotor skills (how the eyes move) include visual fixation, visual tracking (or smooth pursuits), and visual scanning. These beginning stages of child development play a b…
Ambidexterity or Mixed Dominance
Ambidexterity or Mixed Dominance

Wondering about a child who uses both hands to write or perform tasks? Maybe you know a child who uses both hands equally and with equal skill. Perhaps your child uses one hand for specific tasks and their other hand for other tasks. How do you know if your child is ambidextrous or if they are show…