Fun Mindfulness Activities

Here, you will find fun mindfulness activities to help kids with creative mindfulness exercises that can help kids feel better, reduce stress, address anxiety, and have a greater awareness of their body and mind. Mindfulness activities for kids can be used as a self-regulation tool or a coping strategy. The sky’s the limit!


Looking for more ways to teach mindfulness? Here are winter themed mindfulness activities that kids will love. 

These FUN Mindfulness activities are helpful self-regulation tools for kids.

 

Fun Mindfulness Activities



First, let’s talk about what mindfulness means.

Mindfulness activities for kids can help kids with attention coping, learning, self-regulation, and more!

What is mindfulness?



Mindfulness is the ability to bring your attention to the events happening in the moment. It allows us to carefully observe our thoughts and feeling, to develop a sense of self awareness.  Mindfulness can be done anywhere. It does not require special equipment. It can be as easy as sitting and thinking or visualizing a place in your mind.

Who is mindfulness good for?



Mindfulness is great for any age, including kids. School can be a very overwhelming experience with expectations, rules, noises, crowds. Being able to do fun mindfulness activities can be a good way for children to self-regulate, focus and feel better emotionally and physically. Learning how to self-regulate (being able to manage your own emotions) is an important skill to learn at a young age.


Mindfulness is a helpful tool in addressing executive functioning skills needs in kids.

 

Mindfulness activities for kids



Listed below are some easy, beginning mindfulness activities to try with kids.
Looking for more ideas? Here are some mindfulness videos on YouTube.

Mindfulness Activity #1: Mindful Breathing- 

Taking deep breaths is so important in relaxation it brings awareness to your body. There are many different ways to teach kids to take deep breaths and then blow out. Using a pinwheel, blowing bubbles, blowing out candles, picturing a balloon opening and closing with breath. Even having your child breath in while you count to 5 and then breath out.

Mindfulness Activity #2: Body Scan- 

Have your child lay on his/her back. Tell them to tense up all muscles from head to toe and hold for 10-15 seconds. Then have them release and relax, ask them how they feel. This exercise helps kids to recognize how their body is feeling in a tense vs. Calm state.

Mindfulness Activity #3: Visualization or Guided Imagery–

This is a relaxation technique that is used to promote positive mental images. You can find guided imagery scripts online, pertaining to many different subjects from nature to emotions. Start by having your child close their eyes, while seated or lying down. Slowly read the script and have them visualize the image in their minds, then have them draw a picture of that place and keep it in their desk or at home as a reference to a calm place for them.

Mindfulness Activity #4: Take a Walk- 

Being outside and taking a walk is a great way for your child to be present in the moment. Point out the different sounds heard from birds chirping to leaves rustling. Notice the smell of the fresh cut grass or flowers. Feel the different textures of sand and rocks. Notice the sun, wind and clouds. Bring a blanket and lay on the grass, look up at the trees, look at the clouds.   Walk over to a pound and listen for frogs, look for fish and throw rocks in to make a splash.

Mindfulness Activity # 5: Stretching/Yoga- 

Taking deep breaths and stretching can be a very calming and teaches you to be aware of how your body is feeling.  Turn the lights down, put on relaxing music and help guide your child through bedtime relaxation stretches for kids.


Use these mindfulness strategies for kids as a coping strategy, to help with attention in the classroom, to impact learning, or to address self-regulation needs. What’s very cool is that each awareness activity could be themed to fit classroom or homeschool lessons, the curriculum, or seasons. Make these mindfulness activities fit the needs of your classroom, clients, and kids!


Mindfulness is a coping strategy used in The Impulse Control Journal.

The Impulse control journal is a printable journal for kids that helps them to identify goals, assess successes, and address areas of needs. The Impulse Control Journal is a printable packet of sheets that help kids with impulse control needs.

Read more about The Impulse Control Journal HERE.

The Impulse Control Journal has been totally revamped to include 79 pages of tools to address the habits, mindst, routines, and strategies to address impulse control in kids.

More about the Impulse Control Journal:

  • 30 Drawing Journal Pages to reflect and pinpoint individual strategies
  • 28 Journal Lists so kids can write quick checklists regarding strengths, qualities, supports, areas of need, and insights
  • 8 Journaling worksheets to pinpoint coping skills, feelings, emotions, and strategies that work for the individual
  • Daily and Weekly tracking sheets for keeping track of tasks and goals
  • Mindset,Vision, and Habit pages for helping kids make an impact
  • Self-evaluation sheets to self-reflect and identify when inhibition is hard and what choices look like
  • Daily tracker pages so your child can keep track of their day
  • Task lists to monitor chores and daily tasks so it gets done everyday
  • Journal pages to help improve new habits
  • Charts and guides for monitoring impulse control so your child can improve their self-confidence
  • Strategy journal pages to help kids use self-reflection and self-regulation so they can succeed at home and in the classroom
  • Goal sheets for setting goals and working to meet those goals while improving persistence
  • Tools for improving mindset to help kids create a set of coping strategies that work for their needs
This is a HUGE digital resource that you can print to use over and over again.  



 

 
These fun mindfulness activities for kids can help kids in so many ways!
About Christina:
Christina Komaniecki is a school based Occupational Therapist. I graduated from Governors State University with a master’s in occupational therapy.   I have been working in the pediatric setting for almost 6 years and have worked in early intervention, outpatient pediatrics, inpatient pediatrics, day rehab, private clinic and schools. My passion is working with children and I love to see them learn new things and grow. I love my two little girls, family, yoga and going on long walks.

Executive Functioning Skills Course

free executive function course

Free Executive Functioning Course

Wondering about what are executive functioning skills? Today, I’m very excited to share a mini course that I’ve been working on behind the scenes. This Free Executive Functioning Skills Course is a FREE, 5-day email course that will help you understand executive functioning and all that is included in the set of mental skills.

Executive functioning skills course for understanding executive function skills in kids.



So often, therapists are asked to explain executive functioning. Parents are looking for insight and how to help kids who struggle with the underlying areas that play a part in attention, organization, working memory, impulse control, and the other executive functioning skills. Teachers are looking for strategies to use in the classroom while understanding exactly what makes up executive functioning and how to help disorganized kids in the classroom.


Does any of these scenarios sound familiar?

 

This free executive functioning skills course will cover all of the above and describe strategies to help.

Executive functioning skills are a set of mental skills that work together in learning, safety, and functioning through self-regulation, self control and organized thoughts.


Executive Functioning Skills Course

If you have ever wondered how to help kids who struggle with:

 

  • Disorganization leading to impulsive actions and inattention in the classroom
  • The child that struggles to plan ahead and be prepared for the day
  • The child that lacks insight to cross a busy street without looking both ways
  • The student that loses their homework and important papers every day
  • The kiddo that just can’t get simple tasks done like cleaning up toys on the playroom floor
  • The child that focuses on other kids rather than a classroom assignment and then doesn’t finish in a given time
  • The kiddo that is constantly late because he can’t prioritize morning tasks like brushing teeth, eating breakfast, and getting dressed.
 
Do any of THESE scenarios sound familiar?
Easy strategies to help with executive functioning in kids in this free executive functioning course

So often, we KNOW kids are struggling with mental tasks that limit their functioning, safety, and learning. Here’s the thing: executive functioning skills develop over time. Kids aren’t instinctively able to organize, plan, prioritize, or use self-control. These skills occur with age, time, and use.
But, for the child that struggles in any one area, so many tasks that require executive functioning skills suffer. As a result, we see problems with social-emotional skills, self-consciousness, frustration, anxiety, or more!
Executive functioning skills course for understanding executive function and strategies to help

Information on Executive Functioning Skills, right in your inbox!

So, if you are wondering about executive functioning skills…or want to know more about how executive functioning skills work together in learning and everyday activities…join us in the free 5-day executive functioning skills email course!
Understand executive functioning skills with this free executive functioning skills course.

A little more information on the executive functioning skills email course:

  1. This course is entirely email-based. All you have to do is open your email and read!
  2. You’ll discover the “why” behind executive functioning, what to do about impulsivity, tips and tools, and loads of resources related to executive functioning skills.
  3. We’ll cover impulse control, including how we use all of the executive functioning skills along with self-control and self-regulation strategies to “get stuff done”.
  4. This email course doesn’t have homework or tests. This mini-course is informative and low-key.
Take this free executive functioning skills course to understand self-control, attention, working memory, and more.
Enter your email in the form below to confirm your subscription to the email course and you’ll be on your way.
Disclaimer: This email mini-course does not provide continuing education units or professional development units. The course is not intended to treat or evaluate any executive functioning or impulse control needs. This mini-course is intended for information purposes only. The reader is responsible for any action or consequence as a result of strategies listed in the email mini-course or on this website. The OT Toolbox and it’s author are not responsible for any results of actions taken as a result of reading this website or it’s email or social media outlets.
Know someone who would be interested in this free executive functioning skills course? Share the images below and let them know!

Executive Functioning Information

Free email course on executive functioning skills
Understand executive functioning skills with this free email course for parents, teachers, and therapists
Take this free executive functioning skills course to understand attention, self-control, and other executive function skills
Improve executive functions with easy strategies after understanding what's happening behind behaviors and actions.

What is Impulse Control?

what is impulse control

What is impulse control and what is normal development of impulsivity in child development?

Speaking out of turn. Pushing into a classmate in the bathroom line. Interrupting adult conversations. Grabbing a toy from a friend. Impulse control in kids can look like a lot of different things. But what is normal self-control in kids and what is considered impulsivity that interferes with social interactions and emotional wellness? Below we’re going to discuss what is impulse control and how to begin to work on impulsivity strategies so kids can succeed in learning and social situations. Helping kids learn impulse control can be tricky! It helps to understand what impulsivity looks like, what is normal development, and other considerations.

You may want to check out this toolbox of tips on how to teach kids impulse control.

 
Helping kids with impulse control and self-control happens in normal child development. But when you think about what is impulse control and how to help kids with interactions, these impulsivity strategies can help!

What is impulse control?

The definition of Impulse control is as varied as we are as individuals. The thing is, we are all driven by different desires and internal ambitions. Impulse control generally refers to the ability to control oneself, especially one’s emotions and desires. The way these impulses present is expressed as actions, thoughts, behaviors and can occur in any situation but especially in difficult situations.

Here are easy ways to improve impulse control in kids.

Impulse control requires self-regulation, internal drive, coping strategies, and other internal skills in order to filter impulses as they present in various situations.

Impulse control disorder

In order to present with a diagnosis of an impulse control disorder, a set of specific symptoms and signs must be present. These specific symptoms vary depending on the individual and other factors such as developmental level, age, gender, internal drive, and other considerations. However, the signs and symptoms of impulse control disorder generally include different behavioral, physical, cognitive, and psychosocial symptoms. The specific diagnosing factors are not going to be discussed in this particular post but it is worth mentioning that these can present in many different ways. For example, some kids may have aggression, lying, stealing, risky behaviors, low self-esteem, irritability, impatience, and other presenting factors.

For more information on impulse control disorder and if you think this is a concern that should be addressed in an individual, please reach out to a physician.

Impulsivity definition

Medically speaking, the definition of impulsivity refers to an inclination to act on an impulse rather than a thought. Those of us who are generally impulsive in most situations, have difficulty curbing their immediate reactions or think before they act. This can look like the child that speaks without raising his hand in the classroom. It can be a hasty decision. It can be inappropriate comments.

Impulse control development

The thing is, impulse control is a HARD skill to refine. All of us have trouble with impulse control at one time or another! Think about that last time you received an unexpected bill. Maybe you grabbed a cookie or six to calm your nerves. What about when you ran over a pot hole and ended up with a flat tire on the freeway. Did an expletive escape your lips? Impulse control is hard when our minds and body’s are dealing with difficult situations.

The thing is, that we learn to deal with the everyday stuff without eating dozens of cookies or yelling obscenities at our car radio. We filter information, adjust to situations, and make behavioral, mental, and psychosocial responses accordingly.

How does development of impulse control happen?

Impulse control skills reside in the prefrontal cortex. This part of the brain doesn’t fuly develop until we are in our twenties. It’s easy to see why impulsivity is such a common theme up through early adulthood!

Additionally, sensory modulation, emotions, outside situations, difficult environments, illness, stress, anxiety, and so many other issues can compound impulsive acts.

In fact, impulse control doesn’t begin to develop until around age 3.5- 4. 

We will be covering development of impulse control more thoroughly in an upcoming blog post.

What does impulse control look like?

We’ve talked about how impulse control looks so different for different people. We’ve covered the fact that different situations can bring about different impulsive responses.

The thing is, impulse control is so varied!

Here are some examples of impulse control in kids:

  • Keeping negative thoughts to oneself
  • Not saying exactly what one is thinking about in the moment
  • Controlling anger and using a coping strategy instead of physically acting out
  • Raising a hand instead of speaking out in the classroom
  • Standing in a line without pushing or shoving
  • Asking to join a friend’s game or activity instead of jumping right in
  • Asking to look at or share a toy instead of just taking it
  • Being patient when having to wait
  • Waiting for instructions on an assignment before starting right away
  • Resisting distractions in the classroom or while doing homework
  • Waiting until dessert to eat a sweet or special treat
  • Not giving up when things are hard

And these are just SOME examples!

Don’t forget to join us in this FREE email course on executive functioning skills and impulse control.

Stay tuned for more information on impulse control coming very soon. We’ve got some great resources and tools to share with you!

More impulse control activities and ideas you will love:

 How to Teach Kids Impulse Control


What is Modulation?


Easy Ways to Improve Impulse Control


Free Executive Functioning Skills Mini Course

Wondering what impulse control means and what impulsivity looks like in kids? Kids develop impulse control over time, but there are ways to help kids with impulse control!

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      Colleen Beck, OTR/L is an occupational therapist with 20 years experience, graduating from the University of Pittsburgh in 2000. Colleen created The OT Toolbox to inspire therapists, teachers, and parents with easy and fun tools to help children thrive. As the creator, author, and owner of the website and its social media channels, Colleen strives to empower those serving kids of all levels and needs. Want to collaborate? Send an email to contact@theottoolbox.com.

      Self-Reflection Activities for Kids

      Self-reflection is a tool that kids and adults can benefit from. Reflecting on one’s actions and behaviors is a great way to grow as an individual and to meet personal goals. Think about a time you’ve set a personal goal. Maybe you wanted to start exercising and lose a few pounds. By self-reflecting on a day’s events, you can determine what worked in meeting your goal and what didn’t work. You can intentionally put a finger on the parts of your day that helped you meet your goal of going to the gym and what stood in the way of eating healthy meals. Self-reflection is essential for goal-setting! Most of these occupational therapy activities are free or inexpensive ways to address self-reflection in kids.

      Use these self-reflection activities for kids to help kids reflect on behaviors and identify coping skills or self-regulation strategies that work in the home or classroom.

      These self-reflection activities can be a vehicle for helping kids to address areas of functioning in several areas. Improving self-reflection can help kids with self-regulation, knowing what coping strategies to pull out of their toolbox, how to act with impulse control, how to better pay attention, how to improve executive functioning skills, and how to function more easily.

      Additionally, self-reflection pays a part in mindfulness. If we are practicing attentiveness in the moment and attending to internal and external experiences, we can self-reflect on what worked, what didn’t work, and how to make things work better next time.

      Self-reflection can be so helpful in social-emotional skills, academic learning, functional task completion, organization, and well-being!

      Self-Reflection Activities for Kids

      One of the first steps in raising self-reflection to to help kids be more self-aware. They can use tools to improve mindfulness to notice how they feel, how the react, or how they behave. Most kids will struggle with this ability in the moment (It’s tough for adults, too!) but they can identify what worked and what didn’t work in a particular situation through conversation.

      • Using self-control strategies like the Zones of Regulation can be helpful in talking about feelings and self-awareness.
      • Explore along with the child. When a child is playing or exploring their environment, it can be helpful to play right along with them. Use play experiences to communicate through play.
      • Use play experiences to mirror actions. When a child is playing, play right along with them! Mimic their actions and words to be more aware as a caregiver of the details of a child’s interactions and to bring awareness for the child. Use this tactic only when the child is in a positive mood. Mirrored actions should not be completed when a child is behaving poorly or to bring attention to behaviors.
      • Reflect on the day as a family. Plan a family meeting and talk about the good, the bad, and the ugly of the day. It’s a good way to talk about ways to work on areas of need.
      • Create a Choice Collection. Come up with options that include coping strategies or tools to use in different environments. These could be part of a sensory diet or self-regulation strategies.
      • Use a journal to self-reflect through words or drawings.
      • Act out situations and how the situation played out. Consider adding dolls or toys for characters in the situations.
      • Model appropriate behaviors and self-reflection through conversation.

      When saying “calm down” just isn’t enough…

      When a child is easily “triggered” and seems to melt down at any sign of loud noises or excitement…

      When you need help or a starting point to teach kids self-regulation strategies…

      When you are struggling to motivate or redirect a child without causing a meltdown…

      When you’re struggling to help kids explore their emotions, develop self-regulation and coping skills, manage and reflect on their emotions, identify their emotions, and more as they grow…

      Use these self-reflection activities for kids to help kids reflect on behaviors and identify coping skills or self-regulation strategies that work in the home or classroom.

      What self-reflection strategies do you use?

      Executive functioning skills for kids Teach kids positive self talk with these bracelets for helping with attention, self-confidence, self-esteem, and executive functioning skills. Impulse control strategies for helping kids learn impulse control.

      Easy Impulse Control Strategies

      easy tips for impulse control

      Here, you’ll find easy impulse control strategies. Use these tips and activities along with other resources on improving impulse control skills: These impulse control activities and how to teach impulse control. Use those resources in combination with the impulsivity tips in this post as intervention strategies for impulsive behavior.

      Here on the site, we’ve shared a lot of information related to impulse control.  This executive functioning skill is essential for most daily tasks!  When kids struggle with prioritization, planning, time management, persistence, then impulse control can suffer.  

      Likewise, difficulties with sensory processing, modulation, or direction following can limit a child’s ability to utilize self-control in order to inhibit their impulses.  

      Easy Impulse Control Strategies

      These easy ways to improve impulse control are quick tips and tricks that can help kids address impulsivity. 

      tips to help kids with impulse control

      Easy Ways to Improve Impulse Control



      ▪ Use those real life situations to assess what worked, what didn’t work, and talk about it! Sometimes looking at a big picture can help kids.

      ▪ Research tells us that as the day progresses, it is harder for us to maintain and utilize self-control. Make smaller goals later in the day.

      ▪ Encouraging statements can boost and rally! Use imagery to picture successes in typical situations. Find an encouraging statement that really speaks to the child and ask them to repeat it, sing it, and dance to it! Get silly to make it stick in their minds.

      ▪ Rest, a healthy diet, enough sleep, physical exercise, and time of day all make a difference in willpower. The interoceptive system is a powerful sensory system when it comes to impulse control.

      ▪ Physical exercise also leads to changes in the function and structure of the pre-frontal cortex of the brain. Regular exercise such as mindful exercises like yoga and stretching as well as intense cardiovascular exercise helps us become more resilient to stress.

      ▪ Teach kids how to manage stress. When we experience stress, it means that our body’s energy is used up and we act instinctively. Decisions made under stress are often times based on short-term outcomes.

      ▪ Self-control and reining in those impulses requires monitoring. This includes keeping track of your thoughts, feelings and actions in any given situation. Help kids monitor their actions with quick self-checks.

      ▪ Write down the rules. A prerequisite to impulse control includes a knowledge of standards. These personal and assumed guidelines steer us in the “right direction” of following rules. This might include classroom rules, society’s rules, rules of communication, personal standards, and moral guidelines. For the child with sensory processing challenges, communication difficulties, executive functioning issues, these standards can be very difficult to perceive and know! It can be very stressful for these children to know there are rules, but they don’t know exactly what they are.

      Easy Impulse Control Tips

      The impulse control strategies listed above are techniques and tips that can help kids gain control of impulsivity. While development of self-control skills happens gradually and over time, the strategies for controlling impulses can be used to help kids develop self-control necessary for managing impulse control in a variety of settings.

      Reaching impulse control strategies to kids doesn’t need to be boring or repetitive. While the number one strategy for helping kids become more aware of impulsivity in order to gain self-control is listed below, there are actually several more tools for impulse control that can help kids master their impulse control skills  (at least on an age-appropriate level of expectation).

      1. Practice- This is the biggest technique for working on impulse control in kids. Because self-control is a skill that develops over time, going over (and over) those skills can make all the difference.
      2. Self regulation- We’ve talked about the connection between impulse control and sensory processing. The ability to inhibit an impulse can be exacerbated by emotions. Have strategies in place to self-regulate can make impulse control all the easier. There’s more;  When kids  act impulsively in an emotional situation, but then afterwards can explain what they should have done instead, they lack the self-regulation to notice in the moment what is happening. The ability to figure out in the moment that a sense of overwhelming thoughts or feelings are building requires self-regulation skills.
      3. Mindfulness- Being aware of yourself and the world around you allows a person to focus on an awareness as opposed to emotions. Mindfulness is a strategy to improve impulse control by allowing us to control and handle our emotions as they are happening. This is a technique that takes practice (There’s that p word again!)
      4. Stop and think- Teach a stop and think game to stop the action, activity, or conversation and pause to think about emotions and how the body feels. This is a way to stop and slow down to check in with themselves before impulsive actions happen.
      5. Work through distractions- Sometimes, kids become so distracted by things happening in the classroom or out in the hallway that impulsive actions happen during those distracted moments. Science has found a link between impulse control and working memory, which is an important part of focus that lacks during periods of distraction.
      6. Model good examples- Talking through examples and showing kids how to respond to common problems through modeling is one impulse control strategy that can make a big impact. By modeling and walking through a common self-control issue, kids can see exactly how to use other techniques in the moment. It’s a great way to problem solve and strategize together.
      7. Make it fun! Games- Games that encourage delayed gratification or require a child to stop in the moment can be a good tool for practicing impulse control. Some examples include Red Light Green Light, Simon Says, or other turn-taking games.
      8. Think of others- The ability to empathize plays a big part in impulse control. In fact, our ability to control our impulses and empathy are actually housed in the same part of the brain. The thing is though, that the part of the brain with impulse control and empathy reside is the last part of the brain to fully mature. The pre-frontal cortex doesn’t fully develop until our early twenties. But despite developmental considerations of development, we can promote impulse control by working on empathy. How would we feel if someone did a specific action against us? It can be helpful to ask kids specific questions that bring empathy and impulse control into light.

      Some questions to inspire kids to think of others when it comes to impulsivity include:

      • How do you think a friend feels when you take a toy from them?
      • How would you like a friend to ask to play with you?
      • How can you ask a friend to play that would make them feel good and not bad?
      • How would you feel if a friend took a toy that you were playing with?

      6. More practice- Finally, we come back to the first strategy on the list…practice! Take the opportunity to practice all of the strategies and techniques on this list. It will make a big difference!


      These strategies are easy to address but can sometimes not carryover well into typical daily tasks.  

      That’s why I created The Impulse Control Journal.

      The Impulse Control Journal is a printable journal for kids that helps them to identify goals, assess successes, and address areas of needs.  The Impulse Control Journal is a printable packet of sheets that help kids with impulse control needs.


      Read more about The Impulse Control Journal HERE

      The Impulse Control Journal has been totally revamped to include 79 pages of tools to address the habits, mindset, routines, and strategies to address impulse control in kids. 

      More about the Impulse Control Journal:

      • 30 Drawing Journal Pages to reflect and pinpoint individual strategies 
      • 28 Journal Lists so kids can write quick checklists regarding strengths, qualities, supports, areas of need, and insights 
      • 8 Journaling worksheets to pinpoint coping skills, feelings, emotions, and strategies that work for the individual 
      • Daily and Weekly tracking sheets for keeping track of tasks and goals 
      • Mindset,Vision, and Habit pages for helping kids make an impact 
      • Self-evaluation sheets to self-reflect and identify when inhibition is hard and what choices look like 
      • Daily tracker pages so your child can keep track of their day 
      • Task lists to monitor chores and daily tasks so it gets done everyday  
      • Journal pages to help improve new habits  
      • Charts and guides for monitoring impulse control so your child can improve their self-confidence  
      • Strategy journal pages to help kids use self-reflection and self-regulation so they can succeed at home and in the classroom  
      • Goal sheets for setting goals and working to meet those goals while improving persistence  
      • Tools for improving mindset to help kids create a set of coping strategies that work for their needs  

      This is a HUGE digital resource that you can print to use over and over again.

      Impulse control journal by The OT Toolbox

          Read more about The Impulse Control Journal HERE.         

      The impulse control journal is perfect for kids who:

      • Grab items from other kids 
      • Lack a sense of personal boundaries 
      • Show poor self-regulation of emotions and sensory input 
      • Have difficulties with delayed gratification 
      • Struggle with carryover of impulsivity strategies into general situations 
      • Interrupt others or act out in the classroom

      Colleen Beck, OTR/L is an occupational therapist with 20 years experience, graduating from the University of Pittsburgh in 2000. Colleen created The OT Toolbox to inspire therapists, teachers, and parents with easy and fun tools to help children thrive. As the creator, author, and owner of the website and its social media channels, Colleen strives to empower those serving kids of all levels and needs. Want to collaborate? Send an email to contact@theottoolbox.com.