Pre-Writing Lines Handwriting Activity

You know we like to share handwriting activities around here, right?  This Easter egg pre-writing activity is a fun way for young children to work on pre-writing skills in order to build a base for letter formation and pencil control.  While we made this activity an Easter egg-ish shape, you could do this activity any time of year and use any shape to work on pencil control within a confined space.  Preschoolers and Toddlers will love this early handwriting activity!  All of these skills are needed before a child can form letters and work on line awareness in Kindergarten.  If a child is showing difficulty with forming diagonals in letters like “A” or “M”, this would be a fun way to work on building the skill for improved legibility in written work.

Work on pre-writing lines needed for neat handwriting and letter formation with this wikki stix Easter egg (or any time of the year!) pre-writing and pencil control practice activity.




Pre-Writing Lines Handwriting Precursor Activity


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We used just a few materials for this activity:

Dry Erase Board 
Dry Erase Markers 
Wikki Stix 


 Using THIS Dry Erase Boardworked out great for this activity, because we did the same writing activity on the reverse side, which has a chalkboard. Writing with small pieces of chalk is a fantastic fine motor and intrinsic muscle strengthening activity to work on the fine motor skills needed for endurance in drawing and coloring, as well as the tripod grasp needed for an appropriate grasp on the pencil. A chalkboard surface for drawing lines is much more resistant than a smooth dry erase surface, providing more feedback during line formation. 


 We used these
Dry Erase Markers
for their fine point and colorful selection, which made making these Easter eggs a creative activity, too. My preschooler loved picking out the colors to create patterns. 



 The last item we needed for this handwriting precursor activity was Wikki Stix
. As an Occupational Therapist, I feel like I’m always pushing the benefits of Wikki Stix. The bendable and mold-able sticks are a great fine motor and handwriting tool.  In this activity, I bent one or two wikki stix into an egg shape.  You could also make circles, squares, or any shape for your handwriting task.



Developmental Progression of Pre-Writing Strokes

As a child develops, they are typically able to copy lines and shapes with increasing accuracy.  Here are the general ages of development for pre-writing lines:
Age 2- Imitates a vertical line from top to bottom
Age 2-Imitates a Horizontal Line
Age 2-Imitates a Circle
Age 3- Copies (After being shown a model) a Vertical Line from top to bottom
Age 3 Copies a Horizontal Line from left to right
Age 3- Imitates a Cross 
Age 4- Copies a Cross 
Age 4- Copies a Right and Left Diagonal Line
Age 4- Copies a Square 
Age 4- Copies an “X”
Age 5- Copies a Triangle

The developmental progression of these shapes allows for accuracy and success in letter formation.

Get a FREE Developmental Progression of Pre-Writing Strokes printable HERE

Work on pre-writing lines needed for neat handwriting and letter formation with this wikki stix Easter egg (or any time of the year!) pre-writing and pencil control practice activity.

Easter Egg Pre-Writing Strokes Activity

For this activity, we used the Wikki Stix to right on the dry erase board.  I created egg shaped ovals with the wikki stix. I then showed my preschooler how to draw lines across the eggs to create patterns and designs.  We practiced horizontal lines (going from left to right) and vertical lines (going from top to bottom).  We also added circles within the boundaries of the wikki stix and diagonal lines, too.  
The physical border provided by the wikki stix gave a nice area and cue for pencil control.  Try doing this activity with progressing level of developmental line skill.  You can also work on writing letters inside the wikki stix to build spatial and size awareness in handwriting.

Extend the activity:
Use the wikki sticks to do this activity on paper or a chalkboard.  Other ideas might be using crayons, markers, or a grease pencil for more feedback through resistance and proprioceptive input to the hands. 

Want to see more ways to learn and play with an Easter theme?  Try these from the Kindergarten Team: 



Plastic Egg Hunt Letter Recognition  from Something 2 Offer


Plastic Egg Stacker: STEM Challenge from Our Whimsical Days

Erupting Easter Eggs from Adventures of Adam
Easter Sensory Bottles by Play & Learn Everyday

Religious Easter Coloring Pages:  Mrs. Karle’s Sight and Sound Reading  


Work on pre-writing lines needed for neat handwriting and letter formation with this wikki stix Easter egg (or any time of the year!) pre-writing and pencil control practice activity.
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Some of my favorite Handwriting activities:




Rainbow Pencil Control Exercises

If you are looking for ways to work on handwriting and pencil control, then you are in the right place.  This Occupational Therapist loves to teach kids handwriting.  Neatness counts when it comes to writing on the lines and being able to read that homework assignment a few hours into the nightly after-school ritual.  Today, I’ve got one easy tip for helping kids to manage with pencil control in order to write on the lines at an age-appropriate speed.

 
This activity is perfect for kids from Kindergarten on up through school-aged.  Anyone who is writing with a pencil and trying to form letters on lines, copy written work, fill in worksheets, and take notes will love this handwriting exercise in pencil control.
Try these pencil control handwriting exercises to work on writing in lines with the small muscles of the hands for more accuracy with lines, legibility, and speed when writing.


Pencil Control Handwriting Exercises

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This activity is really, so simple.  There is nothing you need more than a pencil and paper.  We pulled out colored pencils to make our handwriting activity into a rainbow of color and to add a visual scanning component.

Try these pencil control handwriting exercises to work on writing in lines with the small muscles of the hands for more accuracy with lines, legibility, and speed when writing.

Pencil Control Exercises

With this activity, we’re working on keeping the pencil strokes within the lines of a small circle.  Draw a bunch of circles in different colors on a piece of paper.  The circles should be 1/4 inch in diameter.  Ask your child to fill in the circle with the matching colored pencil.  A red circle should be filled in with the red colored pencil.  The objective here is to fill in the whole circle without going over the lines.  Because the circle is so small, filling it in with the colored pencil requires very small muscle movements of the fingers.  A child who uses their wrist or forearm to write (such as a child using a grasp such as the thumb wrap grasp, for example, are over compensating for weakness and lack of endurance of the intrinsic musculature in the hand and utilizing a stabilizing grasp.  This overcompensation does not allow fluid motions of the fingers when moving the pencil in handwriting.  Because the circles are so small, the child can focus more on using the small motor motions to fill in the color.

Try these pencil control handwriting exercises to work on writing in lines with the small muscles of the hands for more accuracy with lines, legibility, and speed when writing.



Extend this activity to further your child’s fine motor skills and pencil control in handwriting:

  • Ask your child to draw an “X” in each circle, without going over the lines.
  • Ask your child to draw horizontal or vertical lines within each circle, much like we did here.
  • Create a color coding activity: Match one circle color up with another pencil color.  When you call out a color, your child can fill in that colored circle with a different, predetermined colored pencil.  This is a test of visual scanning and quick thinking.
  • Draw larger circles and show your child how to fill them in with strait pencil strokes.
Try these pencil control handwriting exercises to work on writing in lines with the small muscles of the hands for more accuracy with lines, legibility, and speed when writing.
This rainbow handwriting activity is part of the Rainbow Activities for Kids series.  Find more rainbow activities here:

rainbow activities for kids
FROM LEFT TO RIGHT:
Rainbow Pasta Threading // Play and Learn
Everyday
Rainbow Tinker Tray // Still Playing School
Rainbow Sun Craft // Fairy Poppins
Beginning Sound Rainbows // Playdough to Plato
Rainbow
Marble Painting Process Art
// Preschool Inspirations
DIY Paper Plate Loom: Rainbow Yarn Art // Sugar Spice and
Glitter
Rainbow Sight Words // The Kindergarten Connection
Simple Rainbow Sensory Bottle for Kids // Coffee Cups
and Crayons
Roll a Rainbow // The STEM Laboratory
Try these pencil control handwriting exercises to work on writing in lines with the small muscles of the hands for more accuracy with lines, legibility, and speed when writing.
Looking for more handwriting ideas?  Here are some of my favorites:

Rainbow Math Popsicle Stick Hundreds Chart

This Rainbow math activity used popsicle sticks to make a hundreds chart and was perfect for my kindergarten and second grade kiddos.  (And, it would be a nice hands-on math activity for first grade, too.)  Combining numbers into groups of ten and those tens into hundreds is a math concept that is so important for so many math concepts.  We worked on fine motor skills to build the tens columns and combined them into hundreds to work on a few math skills.


This was such a fun rainbow activity for the season, but this activity could definitely be used year-round.


Use this rainbow math hundreds chart to work on building tens and hundreds into a hands-on math hundreds chart activity, perfect for working on important math concepts and fine motor skills with kindergarten, first grade, and second grade!


Rainbow Math Popsicle Stick Hundreds Chart

 
You’ll need just a few materials for this math activity.  (This post contains affiliate links.)

(A punch like this one is perfect for building gross hand grasp strength. BUT, if you want this crafting project to move by faster than a snail’s pace, use a 3 Hole Punch. It’s perfect for working proprioception to the arms.  Fold paper into columns and slide it into the punch to get a bunch of holes punched at once.

Use this rainbow math hundreds chart to work on building tens and hundreds into a hands-on math hundreds chart activity, perfect for working on important math concepts and fine motor skills with kindergarten, first grade, and second grade!

To make rainbow  math counter sticks:
Punch a ton of holes from the white paper.  Swipe the glue along the craft sticks and count out ten holes from the white paper. This is a super counting activity for kids to practice counting ones and grouping into tens.  The fine motor work going on here is fantastic, too.  Picking up those itty bitty paper holes is a precision grasp workout.  Punch extra holes from the colored construction paper.  

Use this rainbow math hundreds chart to work on building tens and hundreds into a hands-on math hundreds chart activity, perfect for working on important math concepts and fine motor skills with kindergarten, first grade, and second grade!

 

And, you’re done!  Practice counting the numbers using the tens craft sticks.  Arrange them into groups of ten sticks to create a hundreds chart.  

Use this rainbow math hundreds chart to work on building tens and hundreds into a hands-on math hundreds chart activity, perfect for working on important math concepts and fine motor skills with kindergarten, first grade, and second grade!

Use this activity for a variety of hands-on math activities:

  • Build two and three digit numbers
  • Practice addition with and without regrouping using the manipulatives as counters.
  • Practice subtraction with and without regrouping using the craft stick manipulatives.
  • Build a two or three digit number and ask your child to name the number.
  • Ask your child to name a number and then build a two or three digit number.

Looking for more ways to learn with rainbows?  

Rainbow learning activities for kids

 

Use this rainbow math hundreds chart to work on building tens and hundreds into a hands-on math hundreds chart activity, perfect for working on important math concepts and fine motor skills with kindergarten, first grade, and second grade!

Our favorite math activities:


Regrouping double digit math

Outer Space Regrouping Maze


Regrouping Tips and Tricks

How would you play and learn with this rainbow math popsicle stick hundreds chart?