How to Make Letter C in Cursive

Cursive handwriting can be a difficult thing to teach kids.  Today, I’m starting a new series on how to teach cursive letters in fun and creative ways.  First up is how to make letter c in cursive.  This series will most definitely not be in alphabetical order for many reasons, mainly because the cursive writing alphabet is typically not taught in alphabetical order.  So, if you are teaching cursive letters, be sure to stop back often.  For now, here are some great tips and strategies for helping kids learn to make cursive letter c:


Looking for more information on teaching cursive? You’ll love our 31 day series on how to teach cursive handwriting.





Teach kids how to make letter c in cursive with the tips in this cursive letter writing series, perfect for kids who are working on their handwriting.



How to Teach Letter c in Cursive:



This post contains affiliate links. 


Letter “c” is one of the first letters that kids are taught when learning cursive. The letter is directly related to it’s printed counterpart.  The curve of the letter is one of the most basic pre-cursive strokes that are made and helps to build several other cursive letters (a, d, g, q, and o).  

The beginning upstroke of the beginning lines in cursive “c” can be practiced in creative ways in order to help with re-trace when forming the curve of the letter.

Tips and ideas for teaching kids how to write in cursive and learn to make letter c in cursive.

There is research that shows teaching the cursive letter c like a cursive “i” with a hooked top, the carryover of legibility is better.  

After forming the up-stroke of the letter, the curved top, and the re-trace back to the bottom of the letter, it is helpful to work on sliding the pencil along the baseline of the paper to develop letter connectors and to improve legibility.  

Teach kids how to make letter c in cursive with the tips in this cursive letter writing series, perfect for kids who are working on their handwriting.

Tips for helping kids stop at the baseline when writing the letter “c”: 
Use a verbal prompt to bump the bottom line.
Trace the baseline with a highlighter for a visual prompt. 



More tips for helping kids to learn letter c:
The Handwriting Without Tears program  promotes forming letter c without the starting stroke, making formation easier for most kids.   


Use sensory textures to teach letter c and the strokes needed to make the letter. 


You’ll find many more ways to teach cursive letters here!

Try practicing cursive handwriting and more cursive letter c practice with these creative cursive handwriting ideas:




Cursive Letter Order Handout

Get the cursive handwriting letter order sheet here.  Print it out for handing out to parents, other therapists, or to use in an Occupational Therapy home exercise program or education.  


We do love to share creative ways to teach cursive letters and letter order is just a starting point when parents or teachers are wondering where to begin. 





Read the full post for therapeutic reasoning for this cursive letter order.


Here is more information about teaching cursive letters in groups or cursive letter families.


Please contact Colleen at theottoolbox@gmail.com with any inquiries about using this handout in group education. 


Print out your handout here.

See all of our cursive handwriting activities here.

Looking for more ideas to help with cursive? You’ll love our 31 day series on How to Teach Cursive Writing.

Slime Writing Tray

Have you made slime?  I have to admit. We’ve got tons (and tons) of play dough recipes…but we have never made slime.  It’s been on our list for a long time, but we just never got around to it.  We whipped up our first batch the other day and I think I have created a family of slime monsters.  My kids were all. over. the slime.  When we started using the slime in a slime handwriting tray activity, they were even more into it!  This is a perfect addition to our writing trays for handwriting ideas. 





(Psssst: This sensory writing activity would be perfecto in a DIY Sensory Handwriting Camp this summer!)



They were a little hesitant to try touching the slime at first, but once they saw mom getting in on the fun, they had to try the squishy, slimy material. After a few “eeeewwww!”s, they were loving the slime!  I think we have a lot of slime in our future. 

Have you ever wondered how to make slime? This slime recipe is super easy and a great tactile sensory play texture for kids. We used it to work on letter formation and motor control of the pencil with a sensory handwriting writing tray!

How do you make slime?



So, you’ve probably seen all of the awesome slime sensory play pictures all over pinterest.


(Check out our Play Dough, Clay, Goop, and More pinterest board for tons of fun sensory play ideas.)



But, how do you actually make the stuff?  As a newbie slime-making mom, I had to look it up.  We used this recipe and it turned out completely slimy and fabulous.  I have to tell you though: If you are a new slime maker, there is no way you can mix up a batch of slime and take pictures.  It just won’t happen.  So, I have to apologize for the lack of awesome slime-in-process pics, and even the requisite slime-falling-from-a-child’s-hands pictures. We are a ways off from those action shots in our slime journey.


So after we mixed up our new slime baby, we had to get to playing.  


Slime novice tip:  Slime is messy.  And by messy, I mean M.E.S.S.Y. If you are looking for a tactile sensory play activity, this is it.  It’s the coolest texture, but it is mess in a bowl.




Slime Handwriting Tray

After playing Slimer from Ghost-busters with our wiggly glob, we decided to try a writing tray.  This was super easy and a creative way to work on letter formation.  Plop the slime into a low edged tray.  I used a lid from a plastic bin.  Then, grab a pencil with an intact and new(ish) eraser.  Use the eraser to write letters and shapes.  


Love writing trays? Try this easy rice writing tray to work on letter formation and number formation. 

Have you ever wondered how to make slime? This slime recipe is super easy and a great tactile sensory play texture for kids. We used it to work on letter formation and motor control of the pencil with a sensory handwriting writing tray!

Sensory handwriting idea: Try this sensory writing tray for high visual contrast letter formation.

Have you ever wondered how to make slime? This slime recipe is super easy and a great tactile sensory play texture for kids. We used it to work on letter formation and motor control of the pencil with a sensory handwriting writing tray!
This is a GREAT way for new writers and pre-writers to work on letter formation and pre-writing forms.  The slime maintains it’s form for just a little while, but long enough for the letter to stay visible for a bit.  It’s a nice way for kids to trace shapes with an appropriate motor plan and tripod grasp on the writing tool.  

Try these handwriting activities with a slime writing tray:
  • Trace shapes, lines, and letters in the slime.
  • Copy words into the slime.
  • Practice spelling words in the slime.
  • Do single, double, and multiple digit addition and subtraction problems in the slime.
This post is part of the 12 Months of Sensory Dough Recipes where I’m joining other bloggers in sensory dough recipes.  Check out all of the slime recipes this month:

Galaxy Slime | Lemon Lime Adventures


Flower Slime | Sugar, Spice & GlitterPond Inspired Homemade Slime  | Natural Beach LivingSlime Writing Tray | Sugar Aunts
Dish soap Slime | Creative World of VaryaArrowroot Fruity Slimes | Peakle Pie
Taste Safe Slime Recipe | Powerful Mothering

Have you ever wondered how to make slime? This slime recipe is super easy and a great tactile sensory play texture for kids. We used it to work on letter formation and motor control of the pencil with a sensory handwriting writing tray!

How would you use a slime writing tray for handwriting practice?

Join the masses! Get great ideas for sensory handwriting like this and our Sensory Handwriting Summer Camp At Home by joining our newsletter list!

A few of our favorite messy, sensory activities that you will love:


.

                                                   Fizzy Dough Cursive Letters 
                                                    Sensory Letter Formation 

Learn Cursive Handwriting on the Window

Looking for a fun way to learn cursive writing or practice handwriting?  This cursive handwriting on the window activity will encourage a functional grasp on the pencil, an extended wrist, and improved letter formation.  Learning cursive letters with creative writing techniques makes new concepts fun and memorable.  



My daughter is all about learning cursive lately.  When I share a fun way to practice, she is even more into it!  One day, I taped a piece of paper to the window for creative cursive practice.  Using a gel highlighter and a pencil makes this activity easy to set-up and efficient for learning.  


We’re sharing this post as part of our 31 Days of Occupational Therapy with free materials where most of the items we’re using are ones that you can find in your home.  It’s been a fun series and we’re excited to continue with today’s post!

Learn cursive writing with this cursive handwriting activity to learn cursive letters, lines, and connecting lines on the window.

 Learn Cursive Writing on the Window: 





                
This post contains affiliate links.  

Writing on a vertical surface encourages an extended wrist.  While writing on a full vertical surface like a wall or a window is not effective for a lot of writing, practice is appropriate for short periods.  Kids can practice letter formation and learn cursive writing lines with this activity.  
 
This activity is so easy to set up:  

  • Tape paper to a window.
  • Write cursive lines with a highlighter or marker.  I used a gel marker which is perfect with it’s smooth writing lines.  The gel glides onto the paper and with the glass surface of the window, it really provide a a lot of feedback for writing the smooth lines of cursive letters.  Let your child write with the gel marker to try it, too!  
  • Have your child trace the highlighter with a pencil.  The light will shine through the highlighter lines and make a great tracing line.  You can practice beginning strokes like we shared in this post, cursive letters, and words with connecting cursive lines. 
  • It can be helpful to teach similar cursive letters together in groups. Read more about cursive letter families.
Learn cursive writing with this cursive handwriting activity to learn cursive letters, lines, and connecting lines on the window.
 
This would be a great way to continue to learn cursive writing and practice cursive in your Creative Cursive Journal (get it free!)
 
You could also use free cursive worksheets right on the window for another way to practice.
Learn cursive writing with this cursive handwriting activity to learn cursive letters, lines, and connecting lines on the window.

More creative ways to work on learning cursive writing:

Do you remember learning cursive as a kid?  Do you still write in cursive?

Learn to Write Cursive with a Creative Cursive Handwriting Journal

Learn to write cursive letters and words with this free cursive writing journal and creative cursive handwriting activities. 
 
My daughter has made herself a goal for her second grade school year.  She wants to learn how to learn to write in cursive.  We’ve done a few cursive handwriting activities this summer, but have a long way to go as she learns to write letters in cursive, connect cursive lines, and write upper case letters.  Then there is reading cursive handwriting which can be a difficult processing task for some kids.  Forming letters on lines with smooth pencil strokes and re-trace of lines requires practice.  I’ve got some fun and creative ways to learn and practice cursive handwriting to share with you.  Today’s Cursive Handwriting Daily Journal is a creative way to practice letter formation and use learned letters in daily journaling.  


Teach kids how to learn to write in cursive handwriting with a Cursive handwriting Journal, using creative cursive practice ideas. Tips from an Occupational Therapist.

Learn to Write Cursive with a Cursive Writing Journal

We made this Cursive Handwriting Journal to practice cursive letter formation on a daily basis.  Using creative handwriting ideas are a fun way to practice letter formation.  These worksheets are great for practicing cursive letter formation in a variety of ways.  (Try a new creative cursive technique each day!)  They also have an area to use what your child has learned in a daily journal entry.  You can print off the journal along with a tips and tools sheet for creative cursive handwriting.  Get yours HERE.
 

Creative Cursive Tips and Tools for Learning Cursive Handwriting:

Teach kids how to learn to write in cursive handwriting with a Cursive handwriting Journal, using creative cursive practice ideas. Tips from an Occupational Therapist.
 
Some of our favorite ways to learn cursive writing are: 
 
 
Try a few of our other ideas for practicing cursive letters:
Teach kids how to learn to write in cursive handwriting with a Cursive handwriting Journal, using creative cursive practice ideas. Tips from an Occupational Therapist.

To use the Cursive Handwriting Journal:

Teach kids how to learn to write in cursive handwriting with a Cursive handwriting Journal, using creative cursive practice ideas. Tips from an Occupational Therapist.
First, print your journal.  Print off the Journal Cover, the Practice Sheets, and the Journal Entry Sheets.  Print as many of these pages as you like.  We have also included a printable copy of our Creative Cursive Tips sheet.  
 
RELATED READ: Practice pre-cursive strokes with a hands-on playdough activity.
 
We used our journal worksheets to form a few new letters with pipe cleaners. Write the letter in the large space at the top of the page.  Use a pipe cleaner to form the letter.  Encourage your child to use the written letter as a guide to correctly form the pipe cleaner letter.  You can create a permanently formed fuzzy letter by adding a dab of glue at the connecting parts of the pipe cleaner letters.  Then, trace the pipe cleaner with your finger to further practice cursive letter formation.
 
This is a hands-on way to practice and learn to write cursive letters.
Teach kids how to learn to write in cursive handwriting with a Cursive handwriting Journal, using creative cursive practice ideas. Tips from an Occupational Therapist.
Teach kids how to learn to write in cursive handwriting with a Cursive handwriting Journal, using creative cursive practice ideas. Tips from an Occupational Therapist.
Next, practice writing the letter on the lines below.  Encourage your child to write a few  words using the letter and letters they’ve already learned.  You can write a model word for them to copy.
 
You can then use the journal sheets to write sentences using the words that they’ve practiced and learned in cursive.
Teach kids how to learn to write in cursive handwriting with a Cursive handwriting Journal, using creative cursive practice ideas. Tips from an Occupational Therapist.



Get your Cursive Handwriting Journal and Creative Cursive Tips printable and have fun learning cursive in a creative way!

 

More ways to learn to write cursive and creative cursive handwriting activities you will enjoy:

 

Looking for more information on cursive writing? You’ll love our 31 day series on How to Teach Cursive Writing

 

Cursive Lines Fine Motor Art

The latest obsession in our house is learning cursive handwriting.  My oldest daughter asked to learn how to write in cursive and I was so very excited to show her.  Teaching kids how to write in cursive with creative techniques and unique modifications was one of my favorite things to teach as a school based Occupational Therapist.  

We’ve shared a few of the very beginnings of cursive lines, loops, and re-tracing marks that are a the foundation to to writing in cursive, and an important area to work on with older kids who might need a little more practice with pencil control and letter formation on in cursive handwriting.  



You can see all of our cursive writing ideas by searching “cursive” or clicking here.  This cursive lines fine motor art is a powerhouse of fine motor work and cursive handwriting practice.  We connected cursive lines, loops, and re-tracing to form the beginning letters (Read more about which cursive letters to start with.) and worked on connecting lines as well…all with a fine motor twist that resulted in gorgeous artwork!  

We worked on our cursive handwriting, however this activity would be done with any printed letter formation and number formation, too.
Work on cursive handwriting with this paper towel art with a fine motor twist.  Teach kids how to learn cursive lines and connecting lines with this fun activity.


This post contains affiliate links, however we used items that we had around the house as part of our  month-long Learning with Free Materials series where we are sharing learning ideas for homeschoolers and school-extension activities using items that are free or mostly free (i.e. CHEAP or you already have in the home), and is part of the 31 Days of Homeschooling Tips as we blog along with other bloggers with learning at home tips and tools.

Work on cursive handwriting with this paper towel art with a fine motor twist.  Teach kids how to learn cursive lines and connecting lines with this fun activity.


Cursive Handwriting Activity:

This activity is really so simple and makes such pretty art with a fine motor twist.  Start by using fine tip washable markers to write cursive letters, swirls, loops, and lines on a few sheets of paper towels.  Practice cursive connecting lines by making a long line of cursive letter “e”s or “l”s connected together.  Make a long line of “m”s connected to work on the re-trace needed for the bumps of the letters.  You’ll want to practice the re-trace of the letter “c” because that part of the letter is used in so many other cursive letters (a, d, g, and q).  Practice connecting them together for the up-swoop and smooth lines needed with writing cursive words.

Work on cursive handwriting with this paper towel art with a fine motor twist.  Teach kids how to learn cursive lines and connecting lines with this fun activity.

Next, re-trace the loops, swirls, and lines with other colored washable markers for more practice.  It’s starting to look colorful and arty already!
Work on cursive handwriting with this paper towel art with a fine motor twist.  Teach kids how to learn cursive lines and connecting lines with this fun activity.

Fine motor handwriting with an eye-dropper:

Pull out a dish of water and your favorite dropper to slowly add droplets of water.  Pinching the bulb of the dropper is a great fine motor workout for little hands.  Squeezing an eye dropper to grab water and then release droplets requires an open web-space and strengthens the hand muscles.  Dropping water slowly and by the droplet requires a precision and dexterity that works on motor control and further strengthens the intrinsic muscles of the hand.

Work on cursive handwriting with this paper towel art with a fine motor twist.  Teach kids how to learn cursive lines and connecting lines with this fun activity.
Try to use the water dropper as a writing utensil to follow along the lines of the cursive letters.  This will further strengthen fine motor skills as well as line awareness which is so important in handwriting.  Cursive letters will be practiced again and again with repetition by tracing with the dropper and further work on cursive letter formation.

My kids loved that they could add water slowly and make some parts very mixed and other parts more bold by adding less water.  Once you’ve added water to your cursive letter lines, let the paper towels dry.  The best method we’ve found for drying this art works is by hanging the wet paper towels over a cookie drying rack
which can be placed over a cookie sheet
to catch any drips.
More cursive handwriting activities you will Love: 

Love it?  Pin it!
Looking for more ideas to help with cursive? You’ll love our 31 day series on How to teach cursive writing.

How to teach cursive writing with sensory textures

Cursive handwriting can be an incentive for kids to sit down and write.  Many times, kids see older children or adults writing in cursive handwriting, or see a card that comes in the mail with cursive writing.  They want to be able to read the writing and learn to write in cursive themselves.  
 
My daughter asked to learn how to write in cursive, so I was happy to get started with her.  I loved assisting my occupational therapy students in fine motor tasks like cursive handwriting and was so excited to share tips and hints with my daughter as she learned cursive letter formation.  
 
We’ve been doing a lot of practice and fun pre-cursive activities to learn the basics.  Today’s sensory cursive activity is another way to introduce cursive letter lines and beginning pencil strokes.

Practice cursive handwriting with sensory twist using grass seed!  So cool and the kids will love this!  Great tips in this post for teaching kids cursive handwriting.


How to teach cursive handwriting from the beginning:  Where to start with teaching cursive

 
This post contains affiliate links.
Practice cursive handwriting with sensory twist using grass seed!  So cool and the kids will love this!  Great tips in this post for teaching kids cursive handwriting.
When you start to teach a child how to write in cursive, do not teach letters alphabetically.  When a child learns printed letters, they do not learn how to write in alphabetical order.  Instead, you’ll teach letters based on formation.  Lower case cursive letters share similar pencil strokes and make teaching certain groupings together.  We talked about the c letter series a little bit with our fizzy dough cursive sensory activity.  Letters c, a, d, g, and q start with the cursive letter c and are typically the first letters taught. 
 
Today we practiced the l series of letters.  The lower case cursive letters l, e, b, f, h, and k begin with the letter l’s loop.  I had my daughters use 

a bottle of glue
(we go through a LOT of glue in our house!) to draw the loops of l across a page. At this point, do not worry about size. We are focusing on the formation of the “l”‘s loops and connecting the “l”‘s together. You’ll want to encourage your child to form skinny and tall “l”s and not wide loops formed haphazardly. Using the glue bottle really provides a proprioceptive feedback to your child as they squeezed the bottle and form the letter’s loops. You can read more about proprioception in handwriting here.

Practice cursive handwriting with sensory twist using grass seed!  So cool and the kids will love this!  Great tips in this post for teaching kids cursive handwriting.
Next, we used a tray of grass seed for a sensory and textured way to write our cursive letter loops.  Using grass seed over the glue is a great sensory addition to handwriting practice for it’s texture.  Little hands love to examine and explore the soft, yet pokey seed.  It’s small enough that the seeds stick well to the glue and the letters are still very legible.  A larger seed such as dyed pumpkin seeds (although equally as FUN!) makes the glue letters more difficult to distinguish, especially if a child writes the letters on the smaller side.  
 
The small size of grass seed requires a wonderful pad to pad grasp (the pads of the thumb and index finger touching together, pincer (or pad-to-pad) grasp, and neat pincer grasp where the tips of the thumb and index finger are manipulating very small items, and rotation of the grass seed between the pads of the thumb and index finger.  Rotation of items is important as a child rolls items, such as a pencil between the pads of the thumb and index finger.  Rotation of the grass seed happens as they pick up the seeds and manipulate them onto the glue letters.
Practice cursive handwriting with sensory twist using grass seed!  So cool and the kids will love this!  Great tips in this post for teaching kids cursive handwriting.
Form all of the basic beginning lines of cursive.  Practice the loops of “l”s, the curves of “c”s, and the re-tracing of “i”s.  Practice writing the glue and grass lines in connected letters and individual letters.
Practice cursive handwriting with sensory twist using grass seed!  So cool and the kids will love this!  Great tips in this post for teaching kids cursive handwriting.
Love it? Pin it!
 
More cursive handwriting activities you will Love: 
This post is part of our month-long Learning with Free Materials series, part of the 31 Days of Homeschooling Tips as we blog along with other bloggers with learning at home tips and tools.
 
Looking for more ideas to teach cursive? You’ll love our 31 day series on how to teach cursive handwriting:
 
 

 

Fizzy Dough Pre-Cursive Handwriting

This month’s sensory dough is Fizzy Dough!  This was a fun one for us, because we combined one of our favorite doughs (baking soda dough!) with sensory science AND cursive handwriting….Whaaaa? Yep! We got them all in here on this post for you, and it was a fizzy blast!
 
This is a great hands-on activity that can help with the letter formation portion of cursive handwriting. Getting the tactile sensory input can leave a lasting impact on the lines needed to form letters. It’s a great way to make learning cursive not so boring!
Make fizzy sensory dough with baking soda dough and vinegar for a wonderfully messy sensory play for kids
 

What is Fizzy Dough?

What is Fizzy Dough…was the first thing we thought when we saw this month’s sensory dough theme.  Apparently anything that fizzes and is moldable can be a fizzy dough.  SO, we decided to do a twist on our soda dough recipe.  We actually ran out of the corn starch needed for the recipe and added in flour so it became a new soda dough for us.
 

To make the soda dough:

Combine 1 cup flour, 2 cups baking soda, 1 cup water, and a few drops of food coloring in a sauce pan.  Cook over medium heat. Stir until it looks like mashed potatoes.  Remove from heat and place in a glass bowl.  Cover with a cloth until cool.
Make fizzy sensory dough with baking soda dough and vinegar for a wonderfully messy sensory play for kids
 
Next comes the fun part:  Making the fizzy dough into FIZZY dough!  Simply add vinegar for a bubbly reaction that is very fun to watch and play with.  We put our dough into a bin and poured and painted vinegar all over the dough.  It became a squishy sensory mess of a dough, but still squishy.  Add more vinegar for a thinner substance.  My kids loved squishing it between their fingers.
Make fizzy sensory dough with baking soda dough and vinegar for a wonderfully messy sensory play for kids
Make fizzy sensory dough with baking soda dough and vinegar for a wonderfully messy sensory play for kids
Make fizzy sensory dough with baking soda dough and vinegar for a wonderfully messy sensory play for kids
How gloriously messy!
Teach cursive handwriting to kids using sensory fizzy dough to learn pre-cursive line formation.

Teach letters with fizzy sensory dough

 
We extended the activity a bit by adding a pre-handwriting and cursive letter formation aspect to our sensory dough.  My 5 year old rolled out snakes and made lower case letters.  We fizzed them for the sensory fun of it.  Dip a paintbrush in a cup of vinegar and “paint” the letters for letter formation practice.  Be sure to encourage your child to paint the letters in the correct way to practice letter formation and handwriting.
Teach cursive handwriting to kids using sensory fizzy dough to learn pre-cursive line formation.

How to teach cursive letters with sensory dough

Teach cursive handwriting to kids using sensory fizzy dough to learn pre-cursive line formation.
 
When it comes to learning cursive, there is the whole, “Where do I start?”  My oldest daughter is asking to learn cursive and I’m excited to teach her.  
We used our fizzy dough as a starting point to learn the beginning lines and curves of cursive handwriting.  Learning the letters can be easy for kids, but the connecting lines can be a bit confusing for kids who are used to printing words.  Form a long “snake” with the fizzy dough by rolling it on a table surface.  You want the “snake” of dough to be long enough to form several cursive letters in a row.  Use the dough to form beginning cursive strokes:  a series of lower case letter “i”, letter “t”, letter “m”, letter “l”, letter “c”, and letter “u”.  Connect the letters like we did in the picture above to allow the child to get a handle on the flow of the cursive letter lines.  
 
You can draw a line on paper or wax paper to make a form for the child to place the dough over.  Then add vinegar for a fizzy and sensory reaction.  They will love to see their cursive letter lines fizz and the sensory fun of learning cursive handwriting.
Teach cursive handwriting to kids using sensory fizzy dough to learn pre-cursive line formation.


Then use a paintbrush to dip and paint the cursive letters and cursive forms with vinegar for a fizzy, sensory reaction.

See all of the Fizzy Dough in the series this month: 
 
Lemon-Lime Fizzy Dough | Lemon Lime Adventures
Fizzy Dough Cupcakes | Study at Home Mama
Fizzy Bath Dough | Still Playing School
Primordial Fizzy Dough | Peakle Pie
Fizzy Lemon Juice Dough | Creative World of Varya
Edible Fizzy Dough | Wildflower Ramblings
Fizzy Flower Sensory Dough! |  Preschool Powol Packets
Rainbow Fizzy Cloud Dough | Powerful Mothering
Fizzy Dough | In The Playroom
Looking for more ways to work on cursive handwriting? You’ll love our 31 day series on How to Teach Cursive Handwriting: