Polar Bear Game

polar bear math game

Today, I have a hands on learning activity for second grade using a polar bear game. This number line games for 2nd grade could actually be used in any age or grade level math, however, the polar bear craft that we used for a second grade math game turned out to be a fun way to work on base ten operations and adding 10’s and 100’s to two and three digit numbers. In second grade, adding two digits is a big deal! This polar bear activity is a fun two digit addition games for 2nd grade (and other grades).

If polar bear crafts and activities are right up your ally this winter, try some of these other polar bear activities, including a polar bear slide deck for distance learning or virtual therapy brain breaks, and this cute polar bear self-regulation activity.

polar bear math game for teaching second grade place value and two digit addition with hands on learning.

Polar Bear Craft

You’ll need a few materials for the polar bear craft. Full disclosure: This post contains affiliate links.

White crafting pom poms
(1 inch) White crafting pom poms
(1/4 inch) Black crafting pom pom
(1/8 inch) Mini googly eyes
Crafting glue

Polar bear craft

To make the polar bear craft, glue the small white crafting pom poms to the white pom pom. These will become the polar bear’s ears.  Glue the black pom pom to the bear’s face. This will become the nose.  Add the googly eyes and your polar bear craft is done.

There are a lot of fine motor skills being addressed in the making of this polar bear craft: pincer grasp, eye-hand coordination, in-hand manipulation, bilateral coordination, and separation of the sides of the hand.

Polar bear craft made with pom poms or cotton balls.

This polar bear craft would pair nicely with our snowball math activity, designed to inspire hands-on learning with gross motor skills. The polar bear math activity described here would also go well with our Winter Fine Motor Kit, which is loaded with polar bear themed fine motor activities and crafts designed to target and strengthen specific fine motor skills.

Polar bear math game for second grade base ten operations concepts like adding 10s and 100s to two and three digit numbers for hands on fun and creative learning with a fun polar bear craft!

Polar Bear Game

We played a polar bear game to boost second grade math skills by working on adding 10’s and 100’s to numbers along the number line.  I showed my daughter how to use a straw to blow the craft pom pom polar bear craft across the table and along the number line.  

We started the bear at zero and tried to see how far she could get the bear to go down the number line.  I then asked her a few questions that I had written out on cards:

  • What is your digit?
  • Is your digit even or odd?
  • What is 10 more?
  • What is 10 less?
  • What is 100 more?

We played a few times and then tried a few different extension ideas for this activity.

  • Starting at where the polar bear lands, count on by 2’s, 5’s, 10’s, and 100’s.
  • Start out by saying “We’ll add 100 to the number where your bear lands.” Then, practice counting backwards by 2’s, 5’s, 10’s, and 100’s.
  • Use two polar bear crafts to practice single and double digit adding and subtracting.
Make a polar bear craft with craft pom poms and use it in a polar bear game in therapy interventions or the classroom.

This polar bear game would be a great way to work on aspects of numbers with a hands-on approach to learning. Use it along with this Snowman Math-Composing and Decomposing Numbers activity.

Polar Bear Sensory Activity

This activity doubles as a polar bear sensory activity as it offers oral motor skills work. By blowing the straw to move the craft pom poms, children experience proprioceptive input through their mouth and cheeks. This sensory input is calming and can be a regulating tool to help kids focus following the heavy work through their mouth.

Using the straw to blow the polar bear across the table requires some “oomph” because of the weight of the crafting pom poms.  Blowing through a straw is a great way to provide proprioception through a winter-themed oral motor activity. This is a fun activity for sensory seekers, kids who seek out oral motor input, and children who tend to fidget during learning or homework.  

Check out our January Occupational Therapy calendar for more winter-themed sensory activities. 

Challenge oral motor skills with proprioceptive input through the mouth using this straw and cotton ball polar bear craft.

Polar Bear Therapy Activities

If blowing the straw requires too much effort for your child, or you would like to try a fine motor activity, practice flicking the polar bear across the table. Keeping the bear on the table requires precision of fine motor skills, making it another way to use the polar bear craft in therapy and hands-on learning.

Additional polar bear therapy ideas include:

Use this polar bear gross motor activity to work on balance, motor planning, movement changes, and strengthening.

This polar bear science activity challenges fine motor skills.

Use polar bear crafts, pencil control sheets, scissor skills challenges, and more in the Winter Fine Motor Kit.

This Polar Bear Food Chains activity focuses on handwriting.

This Polar Animals Facts Game and this Polar Animals True or False? activity challenges executive functioning skills and scissor skills. 

This Polar Bear Footprint Multiplication activity builds hand strength, arch development, grasp, and coordination.

This Polar Animal Pattern Activity for First Grade focuses on visual perceptual skills. 

This Arctic Animals Sight Words Game develops visual perceptual skills.

For some penguin fun, this Penguin Art Project inspires fine motor development with a penguin craft. This Penguin Addition to 100 with Hundreds Chart builds eye hand coordination and fine motor skills.

Grab the Winter Fine Motor Kit, with 100 pages of done-for-you therapy activities, including polar bear themes. Grab it now before January 9th and you get a bonus of 3 fine motor slide deck activities.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE WINTER FINE MOTOR KIT.

winter fine motor kit

These reproducible activity pages include: pencil control strips, scissor skills strips, simple and complex cutting shapes, lacing cards, toothpick precision art, crumble hand strengthening crafts, memory cards, coloring activities, and so much more.

Play Dough Roll Mats- Use the 6 play dough mats to develop fine motor skills and hand strength needed for tasks like coloring with endurance, manipulating small items, and holding a pencil. Kids can roll small balls of play dough with just their fingertips to strengthen the intrinsic muscles.

Pinch and Grip Strength Activities- Challenge fine motor skills with polar bear and winter themed glue skills page, tong/tweezer activities, lacing cards, finger puppets, 1-10 counting clip cards, 10 toothpick art pages, find & color page, 5 crumble art pages. 

Pencil Control Worksheets- Connect the arctic animals or winter items and stay on the pencil path lines while mastering pencil control.

Arctic Animal Cutting Strips and Scissor Skills Sheets- Work on scissor skills to cut along lines to reach the arctic animal friends or snowflakes, snowmen, and mittens. This is a great way to strengthen the motor and visual skills needed for cutting with scissors.  

Handwriting Sensory Bin Materials- You and the kiddos will love these A-Z uppercase and lowercase tracing cards with directional arrows, 1-10 tracing cards with directional arrows, 1-10 counting cards. 

“I Spy” Modified Paper- Includes: Color and find objects in two themes: winter items and arctic animals; 3 styles of modified paper for each theme: single rule bold lines, double rule bold lines, highlighted double rule. 

Fine Motor Handwriting Sheets- Try the 4 Find/Color/Copy pages in different styles of modified paper, rainbow writing pages in 3 styles of modified paper.

Write the Room Activities- Using a winter theme, these Write the Room cards includes: 5 lowercase copy cards, 5 uppercase copy cards, 5 lowercase tracing cards, 5 uppercase copy cards, 6 cursive writing copy cards, 2 styles of writing pages.

Get the Winter Fine Motor Kit Here.

Colleen Beck, OTR/L is an occupational therapist with 20 years experience, graduating from the University of Pittsburgh in 2000. Colleen created The OT Toolbox to inspire therapists, teachers, and parents with easy and fun tools to help children thrive. As the creator, author, and owner of the website and its social media channels, Colleen strives to empower those serving kids of all levels and needs. Want to collaborate? Send an email to contact@theottoolbox.com.

Second Grade Math Outdoor Learning Idea

There is nothing like learning in the great outdoors.  The breeze in your hair, the birds tweeting, and bugs getting involved in the outdoor classroom.  Learning outside with the kids is a fun twist on the everyday math homework!  We love to spend time outdoors.  And, I love to sneak learning activities into our play.  This Math Scavenger Hunt idea was a fun way to practice second grade math concepts like adding and subtracting two digit numbers.  Our math rocks made this move and learn activity extra fun.
 
We’ve shared quite a few outdoor learning activities on the blog before.  The favorite in our back yard was this pre-reading literacy activity.  We even used a few of the same hiding places for today’s math activity.
 
Outdoor learning math ideas and creative movement activity using rocks for second grade math addition and subtraction ideas.

Outdoor Math Activity for Kids

 
This post contains affiliate links.
 
To start with, we used rocks to create math manipulatives.  These pebbles were collected from a trip to our camp this past summer and painting them was a fun way to recall summer memories.  You can use rocks of any size or shape for this activity.  Just be sure to use acrylic paint so that the color doesn’t flake off of the rock’s surface.  I love this brand of acrylic paints for it’s price! We painted both sides of the rocks in different colors.  You can paint your rocks all one color or mix it up a bit.  We went for the colorful approach.  For the numbers, I used a paint marker.  Be sure to allow the paint to dry before writing on the numbers.
 
When the paints have all dried, you are ready to take these math rocks outside for learning and play!
 
Outdoor learning math ideas and creative movement activity using rocks for second grade math addition and subtraction ideas.

Outdoor Learning Math Ideas

 
We played a few different games with our math rocks.
 
Outdoor learning math ideas and creative movement activity using rocks for second grade math addition and subtraction ideas.
  • I hid a bunch of the rocks in a small area of our yard.  I had my second grader search for two rocks at a time.  When she brought them back, I asked her to add or subtract the numbers.
  • We used specific numbers in a small area of the yard.  I named a large number and had her find two rocks that added up to that number.  (We have enough rocks that we were able to number them 0-100 using both sides of the rocks, so this worked out easily.)
  • Using smaller numbers, I showed her two numbers.  She had to go off and look for the missing number in a math subtraction equation. 
Outdoor learning math ideas and creative movement activity using rocks for second grade math addition and subtraction ideas.
How would you use these math rocks to play?
 
Looking for more outdoor learning ideas? Try some of these:

Map Skills for Kids: Backyard Treasure Hunt from Life Over C’s


Nests Nature Hunt for Kids from Still Playing School


Outside Arrays for Multiplication Practice from Line Upon Line Learning


Sidewalk Chalk Outdoor Math Game from Look! We’re Learning!


Gardening For Math Time from Preschool Powol Packets



Tree Unit Study and Science Experiment from Schooling a Monkey

Outdoor learning math ideas and creative movement activity using rocks for second grade math addition and subtraction ideas.
Outdoor learning math ideas and creative movement activity using rocks for second grade math addition and subtraction ideas.

AM PM Time Telling with Shopkins

I stepped on one again.


A little plastic toy that seems innocent enough, but it’s actually much like stepping on a hot knife. Aka a LEGO.


Only after you’re limping from the wounds of stepping on it, this cute little plastic toy just smiles back at you.  


Shopkins.


If your house is like mine, you’ve got a zillion Shopkins in tins, in plastic sorting containers, and escaping onto the floor only to stab innocent passing feet in the night.  They are little pieces of pink plastic figures that are…a little strange…and your kids know ever single name and every single one they own.  


So, how do you battle the never-ending Shopkins fad?  If you can’t beat ’em (Because they sure are beating up my feet!), then you join ’em!  


We used our Shopkins in a learning activity to practice time telling skills, including differentiating between AM and PM.


Teaching kids how to tell time and AM PM differentiation with Shopkins and a hands on learning activity for math.

Time Telling Activity for Kids Learning AM and PM

This post contains affiliate links.


For this activity, we used our Shopkins on a hand drawn clock.  I pulled out a few colors of play dough to use as movable clock hands.  As we moved the hands around the clock to different positions, I had my daughter tell me the ways to read the clock.  We used both hours (10:15) and words (a quarter after ten) to describe the time.


We then added the Shopkins to the activity.  I had my daughter grab one of the Shopkins.  I moved the hands around the clock to a new time and then asked my daughter to tell me if the Shopkin would be used in the am or the pm.    


Depending on the position of the clock hands, a Shopkin could be used in an AM or PM activity:  A toast Shopkin would be used at 8:15 AM and not 8:15 PM.  The Slippers Shopkin would be used at 11:45 PM and not 11:45 PM.  The cake Shopkin would be used at 2:30 PM and not 2:30 AM.


Teaching kids how to tell time and AM PM differentiation with Shopkins and a hands on learning activity for math.

My daughter had fun coming up with different scenarios with all of the Shopkins.  We got a lot of time telling practice and the cute little plastic toys stayed safely on the table and off of the floor where they could cause me any more foot injuries!



Looking for more ways to play with little toy figures?  Stop by and see what these bloggers have done:


Car Parking Lot Preschool Math Grid Game from Life Over C’s


Alphabet Car Wash from Learning 2 Walk


Sorting and Counting with Die-Cast Trains from Crafty Mama in ME


Directionality Activity with Small Cars from Teach Me Mommy


Forest Animals Letter Sounds Activity from Stir the Wonder


Learning Shapes with Toy Cars from Adventures of Adam

What Makes Ice Melt Fastest from Raising Little Superheroes


Fun DIY Phonics Game from Mum in the Madhouse


What Do Animals Eat? Classification Activity from Schooling a Monkey


Color Mixing with Toy Cars from The Kindergarten Connection


AM and PM Time Telling with Shopkins from Sugar Aunts


Sorting Animals Venn Diagram Activity from Mom Inspired Life


Hands-on Way to Learn Letter Sounds from School Time Snippets


Fairies & STEM Activities: Gardening with Kids from Edventures with Kids


Name & Letter Practice: A Painting With Toy Car Activity from Play Dough & Popsicles


Learning Letters & Reading With Cars! from Preschool Powol Packets

Shopkins Sorting from Still Playing School



Teaching kids how to tell time and AM PM differentiation with Shopkins and a hands on learning activity for math.

Love this idea? Share it on Facebook!



Do you have Shopkins all over your house, too?  Let me know if you use Shopkins in a time telling activity like this one! I would love to hear about it.

amzn_assoc_placement = “adunit0”;
amzn_assoc_search_bar = “true”;
amzn_assoc_tracking_id = “sugaun-20”;
amzn_assoc_ad_mode = “manual”;
amzn_assoc_ad_type = “smart”;
amzn_assoc_marketplace = “amazon”;
amzn_assoc_region = “US”;
amzn_assoc_title = “My Amazon Picks”;
amzn_assoc_linkid = “cef044978ecdc219ba54212212990419”;
amzn_assoc_asins = “B01739Y2FY,B00U2UO2G6,B00Q59EFXI,B00JM5GW10”;

Teaching Kids Money Counting Change

We are plowing through second grade with my oldest kiddo and this Money series was perfect timing for supplementing what she’s learning at school.  We’ve done a lot of second grade activities here based on what she’s been doing at school.  Today, we practiced counting coins and making change with a hands-on activity with a little pretend shopping.  This was a fun way to practice counting money while working on fine motor skills, too.

Counting coins math for kids, including making change and fine motor skills with hands on coin counting math.

How to Teach Kids Money and Making Change



This post contains affiliate links. 


For this activity, we used our play money set.  I love this set because it’s loaded with coins and bills.  It’s a great way to practice and learn money skills with hands-on learning.  We started off by sorting out the coins (after a certain one year old dumped the whole set on the floor!) and it was a good warm up to name and practice counting coins as we put them back into the correct spots in the wooden storage box.


Next, I found a few stacks of sticky notes and wrote some amounts.  I varied the amounts from cents to several dollars.  Then, I grabbed a handful of pens in different colors.  This activity is very adaptable.  Use whatever you’ve got in the house, from pretend play food to real pantry items,  you can use any item for counting money and change.  Use items that keep your child interested. 


Counting Money with Coins and Bills

I matched up the items with different amounts written on the sticky notes.  I had my daughter count out the coins, starting with the largest coin.  I asked her to tell me the number of each coin needed to get the amount, using the least amount of coins.


Counting coins math for kids, including making change and fine motor skills with hands on coin counting math.

Teaching Kids to Make Change with Money

Next, I gave her a few play bills and a handful of coins.  I placed the price tags on each pen and asked her to buy the pen she wanted.  She chose a pen and then counted out the coins needed.  Finally, we switched roles.  I gave her a bigger amount and asked her to count change, starting with the price of the pen until she reached the bill or coin amount.  


We practiced this game over and over again and got some great hands-on money practice, all with “buying” pens!  Using the play coins (and having a huge pile of money to “pay” with) really motivated her to keep practicing money counting. 

Counting coins math for kids, including making change and fine motor skills with hands on coin counting math.

Fine Motor Skills with Money

Counting coins math for kids, including making change and fine motor skills with hands on coin counting math.



We’ve shared how to use coins in fine motor skills before.  We used a few of those techniques today with our play money.  Stack the coins for a pincer grasp and practice in precision as you and your child count out the coins.

Looking for more money activities?  Try these:


Coin Counting Game from Still Playing School


Coin Preschool Letter Worksheets from Learning 2 Walk


Counting with Gold Coins from Line Upon Line Learning


Money Grid Game from School Time Snippets


Simple Coin Sorting Activity for Kids from Something 2 Offer


Gold in the Rainbow Discovery Bin from Play & Learn Everyday


Fill the Piggy Bank – A Money Game for Kids from The Kindergarten Connection


Teaching Kids How to Count Change with Money from Sugar Aunts


Design a Coin from Schooling a Monkey


Coin Flip Ten Frame Activity from Lalymom

Counting coins math for kids, including making change and fine motor skills with hands on coin counting math.
Love this idea?  Share it on Facebook!

amzn_assoc_placement = “adunit0”;
amzn_assoc_search_bar = “true”;
amzn_assoc_tracking_id = “sugaun-20”;
amzn_assoc_ad_mode = “manual”;
amzn_assoc_ad_type = “smart”;
amzn_assoc_marketplace = “amazon”;
amzn_assoc_region = “US”;
amzn_assoc_title = “My Amazon Picks”;
amzn_assoc_textlinks = “B00TRHWLUE,B0007OF234,B0007TZFB8,B00I00NFFO,B00004WKOU,B003U6TTA8,B000QDY5HA,B001Y66JU4,B001IWQIQE,B006ZN2JRS,B0007OF234,B004U9TEEA,B000OCPJK0,B00004WKOU”;
amzn_assoc_linkid = “9431f24f0269c8986d366dbe41524227”;
amzn_assoc_asins = “B0007OF234,B004U9TEEA,B000OCPJK0,B00004WKOU”;

Fun Way to Explain Regrouping Hundreds and Tens with chocolate!

Need to explain regrouping? Are you thinking Ok, HOW do I teach regrouping of tens or hundreds when I am totally wondering “what is regrouping”?!? This very fun and completely motivating regrouping activity is a hands on math activity that will explain regrouping for math as well as regrouping for addition! AND, the best part is that chocolate math is the way to go…even if the chocolate seems to be subtracting (into mouths) more than adding! 



Here’s the thing: Sometimes, practicing the same.old.math.facts. gets booooring!


It’s boring for the second grader and boring for mom.


But, practice needs to happen and new math skills need to be practiced! So, what is a bored-to-the-gills Mom to do when there is yet another night of subtracting triple digit numbers?


You bring on the chocolate.


This regrouping hundreds and tens math activity is hands-on and taste-bud friendly and was a big hit (surprise, surprise!) with my daughter…and me.  We made math fun by adding chocolate chips as my second grader subtracted three digit numbers.  It is such an easy math activity to put together and uses hands-on learning to make math activity fun (and delicious).


We’ve shared a few other hands-on math activities on the blog, and even some re-grouping activities like this double digit regrouping activity or beginner regrouping tips. This one might be the favorite of the bunch 😉

Regrouping Hundreds Math Activity

Regrouping math with chocolate chips


Regrouping Tens and Hundreds with Chocolate 



Full Disclosure:This post contains affiliate links.


You don’t need many materials for this math activity.  
We used:
chocolate chips

((There are Mini Chocolate Chips
on the market for those kids that really want to practice their math problems after seeing this activity.))

Paper
Marker
math problems


Regrouping math with chocolate chips

Use a marker to draw three sections on a piece of paper.  Label them “Hundreds”, “Tens”, and “Ones”.   Grab a bowl of chocolate chips
and some math problems.  Ask your child to look at a math problem and sort the chocolate chips
into the columns.  If the math problem is 634-x=, sort  6 chocolate chips into the hundred column, 3 chips into the tens column, and 4 chips into the ones column.  Then, as your child subtracts a two or three digit number from 634, move the chips around in the columns.  Try subtracting 634-256=.  Six can not be subtracted from four, so you need to regroup to make it a larger number.  Take a chip from the tens column and with your pencil, cross out “6”. Make it into a “16” and subtract the ones column.  Continue through the problem and when you subtract the tens column, remove a chocolate chip from the hundreds column.

Regrouping math with chocolate chips

We had fun snacking on the chocolate chips after re-grouping.  This was a math activity that my daughter didn’t mind doing over and over again!


MORE Ways to Practice math skills with chocolate chips:

  • Grab a handful of chips and place them into each of the columns.  Count the chips and name the number.  If there are more than 10 chips in the ones, tens or hundreds column, move them over to the next higher column.  
  • Practice adding with the chocolate chips and carry the extra tens over into the tens and hundreds columns.



Looking for more chocolate learning ideas?  Stop by and see what the other Early Elementary Blogging Team have created with chocolate:

Chocolate learning activities for hands on learning



Make Fractions Fun with Chocolate from Crafty Kids at Home
Chocolate Cocoa Writing Tray from Still Playing School
Chocolate Sight Words Writing from Natural Beach Living
Chocolate Chips Math from Sugar Aunts
Tracing with Chocolate from Sugar, Spice, & Glitter

Near Doubles Second Grade Addition Facts

Today’s post in our second grade learning series is all about adding Doubles and adding Near Doubles.  You might be thinking, “Say What?” I have to admit, adding near doubles is a concept that I learned along with my oldest when she went through second grade. We made this near doubles activity to help with second grade math concepts, using a fun spider craft. The OT in me loves that it works on quite a few fine motor skills and scissor skills too!

Adding Doubles and Near Doubles 

 
Adding Doubles and Near Doubles in Second Grade Math up to 20, with a hands-on math, spider theme.

What is Near Doubles?

What is adding Doubles in Second grade math?  Adding doubles is a math fact memorization technique.  It is easier for kids to remember that 2+2=4, 6+6=12, 7+7=14, 9+9=18, etc.  Doubles are the addends that are exactly the same.  These are addition facts that second graders need to know to add within 20.
 
Near Doubles are those addends that are almost a double fact. So, 4+5 is very close to 4+4.  Students can easily recall that the double fact for 4+4=8 and by adding one more, they quickly know that 4+5=9.  These are math fact tools that can help second graders add within 20.
 
 
Adding Doubles and Near Doubles in Second Grade Math up to 20, with a hands-on math, spider theme.
 


Hands-On Math for Second Grade: Adding Near Doubles

 
We created a hands-on math activity using the doubles and Near Doubles addition facts with a spider theme.  It’s an easy and quick activity to set up, that will help second graders realize how to quickly figure out more addition facts quite easily.  This is a math skill appropriate for Common Core Standards CCSS 2.0A.1 and CCSS 2.0A.2.  You can see those Common Core standards here.


Adding Doubles and Near Doubles in Second Grade Math up to 20, with a hands-on math, spider theme.
 

To make your Near Doubles Spider Activity

 
Cut out 8 strips of black construction paper.  Cut out a circle for the head. Glue googly eyes onto the spider’s head.  Using a white crayon, write out doubles facts on one side of the spider legs.  You’ll need 2+2=_, 3+3=_, 4+4=_, 5+5=_, 6+6=_, 7+7=_, 8+8=_, and 9+9=_.  
 
On the other side of each spider leg paper strip, write with your white crayon: 2+3=_, 3+4=_, 4+5=_, 5+6=_, 6+7=_, 7+8=_, 8+9=_, and 9+8=_.  You can make multiple versions of these numbers, using the commutative property of addition
 
Glue the legs to the spider head so the Doubles are all on one side and the Near Doubles are all on the other side.  Kids can flip the legs over to see how closely the doubles are to the Near Doubles and how knowing the Doubles facts can quickly help them figure out the Near Double facts.

Spider Theme Activities

If you are looking for more Spider-Themed Activities, the 2nd grade blogging team has got you covered! Check out these awesome spider activities! 
Spider Web Skip Counting from Rainy Day Mum 
Spider Multiplication from Still Playing School 
Spider Skip Counting Puzzles from Creative Family Fun
Spider Themed Double-Digit Addition Puzzles from Life Over C’s 
Spider Lap Book from Preschool Powol Packets 
Spider Web Noun Sort & Printable from School Time Snippets 
Adding Doubles and Near Doubles in Second Grade Math up to 20, with a hands-on math, spider theme.
More Hands-On Math Activities you will love: 
 Commutative Property of Addition  How to Add with Regrouping  Use play dough in math  Bottle caps in first grade math

Noun and Predicate Pumpkin Activity Second Grade ELA

Sometimes you have to make Second Grade boring homework a little more fun.  Am I right?? Homework is definitely NOT play-based and after a loooong day at school, kids are ready to p.l.a.y! When they have to sit down to do homework and study for those upcoming tests, homework can become more of a battle than is should.  Do we ever know this in our house!  Some days, a visit to the dentist to pull teeth would be easier than getting the 5 minute homework task done.  English Language Arts in second grade covers nouns and predicates in sentences and my kiddo has been busy figuring identifying nouns and predicates in her decodable readers that are sent home from school.  We practiced a bit with these DIY mini pumpkin stickers…and voila!  Pumpkin Predicates were born!



Practicing Nouns and Predicates with a Pumpkin Theme:

 Pumpkin Predicate and Noun activity for second grade English Language Arts.  Kids will love to identify the pumpkin predicate with these cute DIY pumpkin stickers!

(This post contains affiliate links.)


First, What is a noun and a predicate?

Second graders are responsible for knowing what a noun and a predicate is, by definition and by showing examples in sentences.  
A noun is a person, place, thing, or idea.  There are proper nouns (like Alabama, Tuesday, and Sammy) and plain old fashion nouns aka: common nouns…(like steak, alligator, and tennis ball).  The noun is the subject of the sentence and is the do-er of the action in the sentence.

A predicate is a verb or verb string.  It is the action of the sentence.

So, after practicing that with my daughter, off we went on our Pumpkin Predicate fun!
Pumpkin Predicate and Noun activity for second grade English Language Arts.  Kids will love to identify the pumpkin predicate with these cute DIY pumpkin stickers!

To make the pumpkins, grab a sheet of full-sheet label paper
This is the stuff that has a sticky back and you make address labels with. Very cool and useful stuff in crafting, I might add. Scribble a rectangle of orange with an orange marker. Then, use your
hole punch
to make a bunch of orange holes. Use a green marker to make a tiny little stem, and you are done! Instant teeny tiny cute little pumpkin stickers.
Pumpkin Predicate and Noun activity for second grade English Language Arts.  Kids will love to identify the pumpkin predicate with these cute DIY pumpkin stickers!
Pumpkin Predicate and Noun activity for second grade English Language Arts.  Kids will love to identify the pumpkin predicate with these cute DIY pumpkin stickers!
We used decodable readers that my second grader had from school.  They photocopied booklets that the school has created and sent home with each student.  You can make your own sentences to practice predicate and noun naming, use worksheets, the newspaper, or magazines.  You don’t want to stick these pumpkin stickers in a real book, because the stickers will be hard to remove. 

Have your child name the noun and the predicate in sentences.  Place the pumpkin stickers above each predicate.  Note: Peeling the backs from the label sheet stickers can be a real exercise in fine motor dexterity!  Your kiddo will get their fine motor skills moving!
Pumpkin Predicate and Noun activity for second grade English Language Arts.  Kids will love to identify the pumpkin predicate with these cute DIY pumpkin stickers!
 Love it? Pin it!

So punch out those pumpkins and play away the homework blues.  These cute little pumpkins are sure to help make predicate practice a bit more fun!

Looking for more second grade activities with a pumpkin theme?  Try these from our Second Grade Blogger Team:

Free Pumpkin Shape Matching Game by Life Over C’s 
How to Carve a Pumpkin Writing Prompts by Still Playing School 
How to Set Up a Pumpkin Engineering Task Your Second Graders Will Love by Thriving STEM

Pumpkin Seed Place Value – Subtraction Math Fact by Rainy Day Mum

Shapes on a Pumpkin by Preschool Powol Packets 

 Pumpkin Math Fact Pick and Solve Sticks by Creative Family Fun

Pumpkin Predicate and Noun activity for second grade English Language Arts.  Kids will love to identify the pumpkin predicate with these cute DIY pumpkin stickers!
Looking for more second grade activities?  You will love these: 

Nickel and Dime Skip Counting Math

Second grade math.  It can be a complicated thing for kids.  Second grade math moves along fast.  We’re in our third week of school and my second grader is moving right along!  We made this nickel and dime coin activity for our Second Grade Math series.  This week’s theme is money and we used coins in conjunction with the skip counting that my second grader is doing at school this week.  It was fun to show her how skip counting by 5’s and 10’s is used in real-world applications like counting coins.  
Nickel and Dime money math skip counting to count money.  This is second grade skip counting math activity is a fun way to practice addition and teach money.


Nickel and Dime Skip Counting by 5’s and 10’s Math Activity

This post contains affiliate links.  Counting and playing with coins is an excellent fine motor activity.  We’ve shared a coin activity for kids before.  For this skip counting activity, we used our Play Money Set only because we had it.  You can do this math activity using real coins.

Nickel and Dime money math skip counting to count money.  This is second grade skip counting math activity is a fun way to practice addition and teach money.

To start, we practiced naming and sorting coins.  I had my second grader sort the nickels and dimes for this activity.  She is working on skip counting by 5’s and 10’s (both forward and backward) to and from 1,000.  So, skip counting out our nickel and dime coins was a great way for her to see how skip counting is used in real life.
Nickel and Dime money math skip counting to count money.  This is second grade skip counting math activity is a fun way to practice addition and teach money.


Second Grade Math Money Activity

To practice skip counting the coins, I created this Coin Skip Count printable sheet.  You can get the printable worksheet for FREE here.  Next, use small post-it notes to write different amounts of change.  Stick the notes along the left side of the worksheet.  You could also write directly on the sheet, but I wanted to save on ink and only print one page for many coin-counting trials.

Nickel and Dime money math skip counting to count money.  This is second grade skip counting math activity is a fun way to practice addition and teach money.

Show your child how nickels add up in increments of 5 and practice skip counting by 5’s to reach the amount on the page.  Then, add up dimes and practice skip counting by 10’s to reach the numbers.  

Alternate activities:
  • Practice skip counting down from 100 by subtracting coins to reach the number listed.
  • Add quarters to the activity to practice adding to dollars.
  • Add up coins to beyond one dollar.
Looking for more second grade activities?  Follow our Second Grade Learning Pinterest board.

Or, if you are looking for more second grade money activities, see what the others on the Second Grade Bloggers team have come up with this week: 

Here are some other great Money activities for your 2nd graders!

Chemical Reactions with Pennies from Creative Family Fun 
 
Money Activities for Second Grade from Look! We’re Learning! 
 
Money Math Problems for 1st-3rd Grade from Planet Smarty Pants 
 
Counting Coins Scavenger Hunt from School Time Snippets 
 
Skip counting nickels and dimes from Sugar Aunts 
Nickel and Dime money math skip counting to count money.  This is second grade skip counting math activity is a fun way to practice addition and teach money.
Love this post?  Share it on Facebook and Tweet: Teach kids how to count money with this nickel and dime skip counting math activity: http://ctt.ec/E9gwN+ it!

More math activities you will love:
 Commutative Property of Addition  How to Add with Regrouping  Use play dough in math  Bottle caps in first grade math