Cupcake Liner Butterfly

cupcake liner butterfly

This cupcake liner butterfly is a scissor skills craft to build fine motor skills and scissor skills. Use this cupcake liner craft in therapy with a butterfly theme or in Spring occupational therapy activities. Spring is here (whether the weather agrees or not!) and this butterfly craft is a fun way to celebrate!  With how easy this cupcake liner butterfly craft is, we’ll be sure to make a few batches of these all summer long.

Cupcake liner butterfly craft for kids

How to make a Cupcake Liner Butterfly

You’ll need a few materials for this craft: 

Butterfly craft made with cupcake liners!

  This post contains affiliate links.  

Related Read: Use this scented scissor skills activity to help kids learn graded scissor use in a fun way! 

Use cupcake liners to help with scissor skills with kids.

To make the butterfly craft, follow these directions:

  1. Cut the cupcake liners like the picture above.  Kids can work on their scissor skills by cutting a material like a cupcake liner.  It’s a lighter weight material than regular paper and a great way to address line accuracy and scissor control.
Make a cupcake liner butterfly to work on scissor skills with kids.

2. Cut butterfly bodies from the black cardstock.  

3. Trim the butterfly wings to curved “C” shapes.   

Cupcake liner butterfly craft for spring!

4. Build the butterflies!  We loved mixing up the colors for this bright and cheery Spring craft.  

Moving the pieces of the butterflies to build the insects is a challenge in visual motor skills.

More butterfly activities for therapy

More Cupcake Liner crafts

Try these cupcake liner crafts to help kids develop precision and coordination in scissor skills using cupcake liners.  

 
 
 

Spring Fine Motor Kit

Score Fine Motor Tools and resources and help kids build the skills they need to thrive!

Developing hand strength, dexterity, dexterity, precision skills, and eye-hand coordination skills that kids need for holding and writing with a pencil, coloring, and manipulating small objects in every day task doesn’t need to be difficult. The Spring Fine Motor Kit includes 100 pages of fine motor activities, worksheets, crafts, and more:

Spring fine motor kit set of printable fine motor skills worksheets for kids.
  • Lacing cards
  • Sensory bin cards
  • Hole punch activities
  • Pencil control worksheets
  • Play dough mats
  • Write the Room cards
  • Modified paper
  • Sticker activities
  • MUCH MORE

Click here to add this resource set to your therapy toolbox.

Spring Fine Motor Kit
Spring Fine Motor Kit: TONS of resources and tools to build stronger hands.

Grab your copy of the Spring Fine Motor Kit and build coordination, strength, and endurance in fun and creative activities. Click here to add this resource set to your therapy toolbox.

Colleen Beck, OTR/L is an occupational therapist with 20 years experience, graduating from the University of Pittsburgh in 2000. Colleen created The OT Toolbox to inspire therapists, teachers, and parents with easy and fun tools to help children thrive. As the creator, author, and owner of the website and its social media channels, Colleen strives to empower those serving kids of all levels and needs. Want to collaborate? Send an email to contact@theottoolbox.com.

Salt Truck Craft

salt truck craft

We live in an area with cold winters and lots of snow.  With the wintery weather comes ice, salt, and snow plows.  We’ve been watching many salt trucks rumble down our road, scattering salt and plowing snow.  My kids love to see the salt truck come and every time the see one when we’re out and about, they shout, “SNOW PLOW” from the back of the minivan.  We had to make an Easy Shapes Salt Truck craft to join our other truck crafts.

Salt truck craft is perfect for kids that love vehicles, and working on early scissor skills.

Other trucks and cars crafts that work on scissor skills with simple geomteric shapes include:

Big Rig Craft

Backhoe Craft

Firetruck Craft

School Bus Craft

Craft for Scissor Skills

If working on scissor skills is a must, then this salt truck craft is the way to go. Kiddos that love all things trucks and vehicles will love it for the vehicle theme, but as a therapist, I see the geometric shapes, making it perfect for working on early scissor skills.


Salt Truck Craft

  This post contains affiliate links.

 

To make the craft, you’ll need just a few materials:

  • Scissors
  • Yellow paper
  • Red paper
  • Black paper
  • White paper
  • Green paper
  • Glue

Other colors of paper can certainly be used! These are the colors we used, and I’ll describe the shapes you need for this truck craft here so you can use the salt truck as a template.

About paper type- Different types of paper provides different amounts of feedback for young scissor users. We love crafting with card stock or thicker paper, because it’s easy to hold with the assisting hand and the paper doesn’t easily bend or move when cutting through it with scissors. Cardstock paper is great for younger kids or those just learning to snip and cut with smooth lines as well as just starting with turning the scissors around a corner of simple shapes..  Its brightly colors make great crafting material and the thickness is perfect for new scissor users. You can find more information on types of paper for scissor skill development in our scissor skills crash course.

You’ll need to draw the following shapes:

  • Yellow Rectangle- for the body of the truck
  • Yellow Square- for the cab of the truck
  • White Smaller Square- for the window of the truck
  • Large Green triangle- for the truck’s Salt bed
  • Long Green rectangle- for the top of the salt truck’s bed
  • 2 Black larger circles- for the wheels
  • 2 Smaller white circles- for inside the wheels
  • Red Half Circle- for the plow
  • Small Red Square- for the plow attachment

Draw the shapes onto the paper and then start cutting. Cut shapes as pictured above to build the salt truck craft.    

Snow Plow Puzzle

Constructing this snow plow puzzle is part of the fun! Kids can work on visual memory by building the truck from memory or by looking at an example picture and then back to their project.

You can build the salt truck with them and then deconstruct the truck.  Ask your child to recreate the truck from memory, using their mind’s eye to recall the placement of the shapes.  This memory is visual memory and an important skill for copying work when handwriting.  

There are other visual perceptual skills at work, too.

Looking for specific pieces that are placed on the table surface is a challenge in visual scanning, visual discrimination, figure-ground, and form constancy.

Remembering the position of the shapes is part of visual discrimination, a skill needed when children need to remember subtle differences in a picture or written work.  Difficulty with visual discrimination will be apparent when a child has difficulty discerning between b, d, p, or q.

Kids love salt trucks and snow plows!  Make an easy shapes truck craft to work on visual memory and visual discrimination.

Early scissor skills fine motor

For more ways to work on scissor skills, along with all of the fine motor skills needed for scissor use and handwriting, try the Winter Fine Motor Kit. It’s loaded with cutting activities, lacing cards, coloring, clip activities, fine motor art, and fun ways to help children develop pre-writing hand strength, dexterity, and motor skills.

Use the fine motor activities, lacing cards, toothpick art, and crafts in the Winter Fine Motor Kit. It’s a 100 page packet with all winter themes, and you’ll find penguins there!

winter fine motor kit

Click here for more information on the Winter Fine Motor Kit.

 
More easy shapes Truck Crafts you may like:
 
firetruck craftBig rig truck craftDigger truck craftSchool bus craft
 
             Fire Truck craft | Big Rig craft Digger craft | School Bus craft  

Colleen Beck, OTR/L is an occupational therapist with 20 years experience, graduating from the University of Pittsburgh in 2000. Colleen created The OT Toolbox to inspire therapists, teachers, and parents with easy and fun tools to help children thrive. As the creator, author, and owner of the website and its social media channels, Colleen strives to empower those serving kids of all levels and needs. Want to collaborate? Send an email to contact@theottoolbox.com.

Pumpkin Craft to Build Fine Motor SKills

pumpkin craft that builds fine motor skills.

This pumpkin craft is a fun way to build fine motor skills and to use recycled materials at the same time. This cute pumpkin craft was actually designed, created, and photographed by my daughters! I love to see them doing what they love: creating homemade crafts while fostering occupational balance and helping others build skills by sharing such a fun Fall craft.

Pumpkin craft that helps kids build fine motor skills, using recycled bottle caps.

Pumpkin Fine Motor Activity

By making this craft, kids can build many fine motor skills. It’s a pumpkin fine motor activity without the goopy mess of pumpkin guts and seeds!

This is a great Halloween occupational therapy activity to add to your toolbox…Just by making this Halloween craft, kids can build dexterity, refined grasp, and precision. Let’s break down how this craft builds fine motor skills:

Precision– The pumpkin craft is a miniature pumpkin, just sized right for a bottle cap. Working on a small scale, kids can work on precision of grasp as they pick up and manipulate the materials.

Pincer grasp- In fact, that tip to tip grasp that uses the pads of the pointer finger and they thumb, pincer grasp is used. This refined grasp is needed to pick up the googly eyes, pinch and place tape, maneuver the pipe cleaner piece.

Neat pincer grasp– When that pincer grasp requires even more precision and the tips of the pointer finger and the thumb bend at the last joint, a neat pincer grasp is used. This grasp is needed to pick up very small items such as a mini-jack-o-lantern eyes and cutouts.

Separation of the sides of the hand– Manipulating tape, picking up small items, and cutting with scissors fosters the fine motor skill of separation of the sides of the hand. This skill is essential for a functional pencil grasp.

Bilateral coordination– Pulling and ripping tape is a great bilateral coordination task. Kids can use coordinated use of both hands throughout this pumpkin craft activity. Working on a small scale in a craft like this one pulls concentrated near-point work at the midline, making it a nice pre-cursor activity to refine skills needed for reading, writing, and other tasks requiring fine motor coordination skills.

Gross grasp– Hand strength is built through the power side of the hand, or the ulnar side. When the power side is strengthened through gross grasp activities like squeezing a glue bottle, kids can gain more stability in the hand as they complete fine motor tasks. Squeezing the glue bottle in a small space requires a refined grasp, so glue is stopped when appropriate and there isn’t a giant pool of glue all over the table. This ability to squeeze a glue bottle in a small spot with accuracy isn’t easy for some kiddos! Here is more information on gross grasp.

Scissor skills– This fine motor Halloween activity has very small scissor work, making it a nice way to work on precision and graded scissor skills.

Work on fine motor skills with kids using this fine motor pumpkin craft.

Let’s make a Cute Pumpkin Craft for Kids!

Craft supplies to make a pumpkin craft with kids.

First step is to gather all of your materials. Your materials for this pumpkin craft are: (Amazon affiliate links included below)

How to make a pumpkin craft

Let’s get started with making this cutie mini pumpkin craft.

Cut green and brown pipe cleaners to make the pumpkin craft.
  1. First, cut the pipe cleaners to a length of about one inch. Put the pipe cleaners on the edge of one bottlecap. When you have it in a good spot add orange tape on the sides so it will stick.
Use recycled bottle caps to make a pumpkin craft with kids.

2. Place the second bottle cap on the edge of the first bottle cap so the rims are touching and sandwiching the pipe cleaners. Add a strip of orange tape around the outside of both bottle caps for a 3D pumpkin craft!

3. Cut a small piece of the green pipe cleaner and bend it into a leaf shape.

4. Then cut out your black construction paper to make a small jack-o-lantern face.

Use orange washi tape to make a mini pumpkin craft.

5. Next, glue the small construction paper pieces in the position you would like it to be on one of the bottle caps.

 Have fun building fine motor skills with this mini pumpkin craft!

Cute mini pumpkin craft using recycled bottle caps.

More Halloween Crafts you will love

Pumpkin Thumbprint craft
Bat craft for halloween
Pumpkin stamp craft

Colleen Beck, OTR/L is an occupational therapist with 20 years experience, graduating from the University of Pittsburgh in 2000. Colleen created The OT Toolbox to inspire therapists, teachers, and parents with easy and fun tools to help children thrive. As the creator, author, and owner of the website and its social media channels, Colleen strives to empower those serving kids of all levels and needs. Want to collaborate? Send an email to contact@theottoolbox.com.

Cutting with Scissors Program

Tips to teach kids to hold scissors

Teaching kids to cut with scissors depends a lot on the type of cutting scissors that are used. Ask any pediatric occupational therapist, and you will find recommendations for kid-friendly scissors that actually allow kids to cut paper. You know…the training scissors to introduce kids to scissor skills…the ones that don’t just tear through paper.

Choosing the best scissors for kids

When it comes to finding the best scissors for kids, there is a lot more to it than you might think. Cutting scissors need to fit the child’s hand and feel comfortable. They need to be safe and allow the child to learn to manipulate the scissors while cutting paper (and nothing else). They need to have molded handles that are easy to hold in the correct position. And they need to grow with the child so they can progress from cutting snips to shapes and multi-angled forms.

Teaching kids to cut with scissors is a progress. There are tips that can help along the way and there are strategies that can help a child succeed.

Having scissors and a strategy can help!

Why is teaching scissor skills important? Teaching kids to cut with scissors helps with fine motor skills and more.

Why is cutting with scissors important?

When we teach kids the correct way to hold scissors, kids find so much more success in cutting shapes. You probably have seen the child that holds scissors sideways on the paper. They open and close the scissor blades but nothing happens.

Maybe you’ve seen the child that pushes the scissors through the paper. They tear and rip the page instead of cutting along the lines.

You might recall the child that holds the scissors with their elbow out and up in the air so they are cutting in toward their body instead of out and along the lines.

All of these positioning tactics lead to poor scissor skills and a frustrated kiddo.

Importance of Scissor Skills

When we show kids how to properly hold scissors we set them up for success. When we hand scissors that properly fit the child, we are providing the tools for accuracy.

Teaching kids to hold the scissors correctly allows them to position correctly so they can cut along the lines and feel success as they cut shapes.

When kids open and close the scissor blades, they gain precision of fine motor skills. And, those same fine motor skills allow the child to gain accuracy in cutting more complex shapes and forms.

Cutting with scissors builds bilateral coordination skills so they can use both hands together in a coordinated manner.

Cutting along lines offers a way to gain accuracy and precision in eye-hand coordination skills.

Not only are kids gaining developmental motor skills, they are completing a functional task, too. Teaching kids the proper way to hold scissors allows them to open and close the blades to cut along the lines with accuracy. They can snip the paper rather than tear. They can progress in scissor skill development from showing an interest in cutting with scissors to cutting complex shapes.

So how to teach kids the right positioning for cutting with scissors?

use these tips to teach kids to hold scissors

Positioning for scissor skills

First in addressing positioning for scissor skills is sitting posture. Make sure the child is seated at a desk or table with their feet flat on the floor and arms at a functional position. Using a table that is too high puts the elbows and shoulders into too much flexion.

Tuck the elbows into the sides. Many times, we see new scissor users holding their elbows way out to the sides as they attempt to bring the scissor work closer to their face and body. Actually, having the child tuck their elbows into their side offers more support so they can work on refining those fine motor skills.

Make sure the scissors are positioned on the hand correctly. Kids often times, place their thumb in the small loop of the scissor handles and push all of their other fingers into the larger hole. If possible, ensure that the thumb is in the smaller loop and the middle finger is placed in the larger loop with the ring ginger and pinkie finger tucked into the palm for support.

If that positioning isn’t possible, allow the child to use their middle, ring, and pinkie fingers in the larger loop.

Be sure that the scissors are positioned perpendicular to the paper. When the scissors tilt sideways due to upper body positioning, the paper tends to tear rather than cut.

All of these tips, and much more are available in The Scissor Skills Book, created by an occupational therapist and physical therapist team that covers all things development and motor skills needed for cutting with scissors.

Scissor Skills Curriculum

So, if working on scissor skills, positioning, and building scissor accuracy is something you are working on with kids, then you are going to love this item!

Noggins is a 4 Pack Reusable Stickers, Scissors, and Scissor skills Curriculum

This scissor curriculum provides reusable stickers to help with positioning the scissors so kids can cut along lines.

You also get 3 pairs of scissors and a FREE download of our custom Nogginsland curriculum – which is a 22 page guide jam packed with activities to help your child grow and develop their fine motor skills. 

 Noggins spark imagination and motivate children to learn through pretend play.

  • When Noggins are attached to pencils, markers, or crayons, they turn those objects into creatures, with the tip of the writing utensil becoming the nose. This allows the child to pretend the Noggin is smelling flowers or sniffing through a maze, rather than merely tracing or drawing. The Noggin also acts a pencil grip, cueing correct finger position on the writing utensils.
  • When Noggins are placed on scissors, they act as a visual cue, guiding the child to orient them correctly. They turn the scissors into a creature, with the bottom blade becoming the lower jaw. This enables the Noggin to “bite” and “chew” paper, showing the concept and technique of scissor use in a fun and playful way.
  • When Noggins are attached to fingers, they transform the hand into a creature. This allows practice and development of a variety of grasps in a fun and playful way. Children are able to pinch and squeeze play dough and small objects, imagining that the creature is eating, while their own pincer grasp and lateral pinch develops.

Use the foam stickers to help with positioning of pencils, too.

Elmer the Elephant Activities

Elmer the Elephant activities

Elmer the patchwork elephant looks different than his friends. Through stories and colorful pictures that depict everyday elephant life, Elmer the elephant teaches us about diversity and differences. Elmer teaches us about acceptance, friendship, and empathy. Check out the Elmer the Elephant activity below that builds a baseline for these important skills, but also helps kids with fine motor skills, visual perceptual skills, and visual motor skills.

If you love the Elmer books as much as we do, then you will adore this Elmer the Elephant activity. We LOVE Elmer the Elephant…and all of the Elmer books. Every time we go to the library, we are sure to check the shelf for a new Elmer book that we may have missed. This week’s book activity was so much fun to do with the kids, because it involved one of our favorite books (ever) and a great visual perception activity. Add this book activity to your list of crafts based on children’s books that build skills through reading.

Elmer the Elephant Activity

This fine motor craft is a powerful one because it not only builds essential visual perceptual, visual motor, and fine motor skills, but it teaches as well. This Elmer the elephant activity can be used to illustrate differences, empathy, and friendship. Here are more books that teach empathy and friendship that can be used in therapy sessions or in the classroom or home.

They loved creating and building our very own Elmer craft. Elmer’s colors made for a great way to help kids build fine motor skills and visual motor skills, too. I loved throwing in the scissor work portion of the activity and working on a few important skills. My youngest daughter worked on her color identification and sorting.  The colors in Elmer’s patchwork skin are perfect for Toddlers to practice naming colors.  Little Guy was loving the puzzle-building portion of our activity.  The lines were a great way to work on a few visual perceptual skills needed for handwriting.  

Elmer the elephant activity that uses the Elmer children's book as a guide and activity to help kids understand acceptance, differences, and diversity while building fine motor skills.

Elmer the Patchwork Elephant Activity

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If you haven’t read Elmer by David McKee, this is definitely a book you need to check out.  Elmer is a patchwork elephant with many colors.  He sticks out from the crowd of gray elephants. By exploring and interacting with his community of elephants, Elmer and the other elephants learn to accept and value his unique characteristics. Elmer is not only a colorful patchwork elephant. He is funny, smart, caring, and an individual. The book teaches us to accept differences because those differences are what make us who we are.

Elmer teaches us about diversity. He teaches us about identity and tolerance. We all have different colors, shapes, interests, abilities, talents, and ideas. Those differences are what make us special. Let’s see those differences, accept them, and celebrate them!

We made our own patchwork elephant with lots of colors and had a great time building and creating while talking about color names.  This was such a great activity for both Little Guy and Baby Girl.

Try this Elmer the Elephant activity to teach children skills like scissor use and fine motor development with a wonderful children's book.


We started with Foam Sheets in lots of different colors.  You might have seen our color sorting scissor activity post where we practiced our scissor skills.  These squares came in handy for this Elmer activity.

Create an Elmer the Elephant activity using foam pieces to teach children about empathy and acceptance of differences in others while building fine motor and visual motor skills.

 I found a picture frame at the Dollar Store that has an acrylic front, instead of glass.  This is a great writing surface using a white board marker.  I drew an outline of Elmer with the marker.  We had a little bowl of water and started sticking the foam squares onto the surface to build our Elmer.  When the foam pieces are dunked into water, they stick really well to the picture frame surface.  We did a version of this way back when our blog began with our rainbow building activity.

Fine motor activity for the book, Elmer the Elephant.

Visual Perception Activity for Kids

There were fingers everywhere, adding patchwork squares!  Little Guy and I quizzed Baby Girl on her colors as we worked.  It was a fun puzzle to get the squares fitting into the outline.  What a great way to work on visual perceptual skills, fine motor precision, dexterity, and line awareness!

Visual perceptual skills in kids are necessary for so many things…from self-care to fine motor skills, to gross motor skills…all parts of a child’s development require visual perception.  There are many pieces to the giant term of “visual perception”.  This Elmer building activity works on quite a few of these areas:

Visual Discrimination is determining differences in color, form, size, shape…Finding different sized squares to fit into the outline of our Elmer, discriminating the different colors, and shapes are a great way to work on this area. 

Visual Closure is the ability to fill in parts of a form in the mind’s eye to determine shape or a whole object.  Filling in the missing parts of our Elmer works on this area.

Visual Spatial Relations is organizing the body in relation to objects or spatial awareness.  This is an important part of handwriting.  Spacing those pieces amongst the others and in relation to the lines is one way to work on this skill.

Visual Figure Ground is the ability to locate objects within a cluttered area (think “I Spy”).  Finding a red square among the pile of foam pieces is one fun way to work on this area of visual perception.

Use this fine motor activity with the book Elmer the Elephant to help kids learn abstract concepts while building visual perception.

  Little Guy was really into this activity.  He loved lining up the squares to make our Elmer.

Elmer the Elephant puzzle that kids can do to build skills in occupational therapy sessions or in the classroom or home.

We loved how our Elmer turned out!  We’ll be using our frame again, soon.  I can think of so many fun ways to learn and play with this dollar store frame and a marker!

Elmer the Elephant book and Elmer activity for kids

More Elmer the Elephant Activities

Elmer the elephant activities for kids based on the children's book, Elmer the Elephant


Check out some of these Elmer the Elephant activities for kids. They are powerful ways to build awareness, acceptance, and friendship through the book and activity.

Elmer the Elephant activity with facepaint

Use face paint to celebrate friendship with a face painting party based on the Elmer the Elephant book.

Elmer the elephant craft

Make an Elmer craft using puppets to celebrate differences, diversity, and uniqueness in a great lesson for kids, while building fine motor skills.

Create an Elmer craft using stamp painting.

Create an Elmer the patchwork elephant craft using paint to make a paint stamped elephant craft. What a great way to build fine motor skills!

Elmer the elephant preschool craft

Kids can trace their bodies with large pieces of paper and then fill the space with colorful paper squares to celebrate uniqueness in this Elmer the Elephant preschool activity.

Teach Acceptance, Differences, and Diversity

Want to take complex and abstract concepts like empathy, acceptance, uniqueness, and diversity to the next level with kids? This digital, E-BOOK, Exploring Books Through Play: 50 Activities Based on Books About Friendship, Acceptance and Empathy is filled with hands-on activities rooted in interactive, hands-on, sensory play that focus on creating a well-rounded early childhood education supporting growth in literacy, mathematics, science, emotional and social development, artistic expression, sensory exploration, gross motor development and fine motor skills.

Kids can explore books while building specific skills in therapy sessions, as part of home programs, or in the home. is an amazing resource for anyone helping kids learn about acceptance, empathy, compassion, and friendship.

In this book, you’ll find therapist-approved resources, activities, crafts, projects, and play ideas based on 10 popular children’s books. Each book covered contains activities designed to develop fine motor skills, gross motor skills, sensory exploration, handwriting, and more. Help kids understand complex topics of social/emotional skills, empathy, compassion, and friendship through books and hands-on play.

Click here to get the book and add children’s books based on social emotional learning to your therapy practice, home activities, or classroom.

Exploring books through play is a guide to using children's books in therapy and while building developmental skills.

More books to teach social emotional skills

Check out our other posts in the Preschool Book Club Series for activities based on favorite books:

Colleen Beck, OTR/L is an occupational therapist with 20 years experience, graduating from the University of Pittsburgh in 2000. Colleen created The OT Toolbox to inspire therapists, teachers, and parents with easy and fun tools to help children thrive. As the creator, author, and owner of the website and its social media channels, Colleen strives to empower those serving kids of all levels and needs. Want to collaborate? Send an email to contact@theottoolbox.com.

Easter Scissor Skills Activity for Kids

occupational therapy tools for building scissor skills in kids and helping children to cut with scissors with a fun Easter fine motor activity.

This Easter scissor skills activity for kids is a creative way to work on scissor skills with kids this time of year. Coming up with Easter ideas for kids doesn’t need to be difficult. Use a few items found at your dollar store to help kids address skills like bilateral coordination, graded precision with scissor control, and eye-hand coordination and other fine motor skills. In fact, adding this fine motor activity to an Easter or Spring craft session can be a fun way to build specific skills in a fun way.  

This is a quick and easy scissor activity to add to your occupational therapy toolkit. We used a plastic Easter egg and Easter grass (the kind that is used to fill Easter baskets) to work on basic scissor skills like opening and shutting the scissors and using the non-dominant helper hand in a fun cutting activity.

occupational therapy tools for building scissor skills in kids and helping children to cut with scissors with a fun Easter fine motor activity.

Easter Activity for Kids

This post contains affiliate links.  

You’ll need just a few materials for this scissor activity:  

A scissor activity that is easy to create is a great activity for the Occupational Therapist’s therapy toolkit.  We used plastic Easter eggs from our Easter supply bin to hold a long strand of Easter grass.  Both of these items can be found at your dollar store, making this a frugal way to address scissor skills.   

This Easter activities for kids doubles as a scissor skills activity to help kids cut with graded precision and accuracy.

To create this Easter themed scissor activity, open up the plastic egg.  Then, place a long strand of Easter grass in the egg and thread one end of the grass through the hole in the egg.  Most plastic Easter eggs have a small hole in one end.  If yours doesn’t, then this activity won’t work.  Simply look for an egg with the hole in one end of the plastic egg.   And that’s it!

You now have an Easter-themed scissor activity ready for practicing basic scissor skills.

This Easter activity for kids doubles as a scissor skills activity to build precision and accuracy with cutting with scissors.

Occupational therapy Tools and SKills

There are a myriad number of skills that an occupational therapist can address in kids. Occupational therapists address the underlying skills that interfere with function and occupation. Those OT skills include of fine motor strength, dexterity, stability, coordination, visual perception, sensory processing…the list goes on and on when it comes to meaningful occupations and the occupational therapy tools that address these areas..

One such occupational therapy area that this OT tool addresses are independence with using scissor as well as precision with scissors in their dominant hand. Kids can hold the egg in one hand while managing bilateral coordination, precision, laterality and more. They can pull out the Easter grass through the egg and work on cutting bits of the grass.  With a small piece of Easter grass sticking out of the egg, kids can address precision grasp and release when using scissors during cutting tasks.     The egg makes a great grasping tool for younger kids.  While use of scissors requires children to hold onto and manipulate paper with their non-dominant hand, holding the egg promotes a power grasp with arch development during this cutting with scissors.    

Pulling the strand of grass out of the egg is a nice way to work on neat pincer grasp and threading more into the plastic egg’s hole is an excellent way to encourage fine motor development. Here are more Spring fine motor activities to keep your little ones busy and working on hand strength and dexterity this time of year.   

Use this Easter activity for kids to help with scissor skills as a fine motor activity that pairs nicely with Easter crafts for preschoolers and school aged kids.
Use this Easter activity for preschoolers or older kids to work on scissor skills and teaching kids to cut with scissors.

Looking for more creative scissor skills activities?  Try these:

 
 
 
    
 
Teach kids Scissor skills and accuracy with cutting with scissors with this easy Easter activity for kids.

Spring Fine Motor Kit

Score Fine Motor Tools and resources and help kids build the skills they need to thrive!

Developing hand strength, dexterity, dexterity, precision skills, and eye-hand coordination skills that kids need for holding and writing with a pencil, coloring, and manipulating small objects in every day task doesn’t need to be difficult. The Spring Fine Motor Kit includes 100 pages of fine motor activities, worksheets, crafts, and more:

Spring fine motor kit set of printable fine motor skills worksheets for kids.
  • Lacing cards
  • Sensory bin cards
  • Hole punch activities
  • Pencil control worksheets
  • Play dough mats
  • Write the Room cards
  • Modified paper
  • Sticker activities
  • MUCH MORE

Click here to add this resource set to your therapy toolbox.

Spring Fine Motor Kit
Spring Fine Motor Kit: TONS of resources and tools to build stronger hands.

Grab your copy of the Spring Fine Motor Kit and build coordination, strength, and endurance in fun and creative activities. Click here to add this resource set to your therapy toolbox.

Colleen Beck, OTR/L is an occupational therapist with 20 years experience, graduating from the University of Pittsburgh in 2000. Colleen created The OT Toolbox to inspire therapists, teachers, and parents with easy and fun tools to help children thrive. As the creator, author, and owner of the website and its social media channels, Colleen strives to empower those serving kids of all levels and needs. Want to collaborate? Send an email to contact@theottoolbox.com.

Place Value Scarecrow Craft

Scarecrow craft to help with math skills

Need a math craft idea that is perfect for this time of year? Look no further. This scarecrow craft can be used for any grade or age. Kids can be resistant to practicing extra math facts and practicing skills that they’ve learned in school or homeschool.  But often times, math skills like adding and composing numbers up to 1000 in this second grade math activity NEED additional practicing at home.  So how do you get that extra practice in without pulling teeth (or pulling out your own hair!)??  Playful Math activities make learning and practicing skills fun. We made this Math Scarecrow Craft to practice second grade math, including place value and composing numbers…but you can make it age-appropriate for preschool on up through elementary-aged kids.


Make this Scarecrow craft this Fall and practice math facts and addition or subtraction.  This is perfect for second grade math or any preschool or elementary age student, and a fantastic scissor skill exercise for kids.
 
 


Scarecrow Craft

 
This post contains affiliate links.  
 
To make this scarecrow craft, you’ll need a few materials:
Ivory Cardstock
scissors (THESE are my favorite brand and what I always recommended as a school-based OT!)
glue
Goldenrod cardstock
orange cardstock
Buttons, paper scraps, ribbons, etc.
Brown Paper Bag
 
Make this Scarecrow craft this Fall and practice math facts and addition or subtraction.  This is perfect for second grade math or any preschool or elementary age student, and a fantastic scissor skill exercise for kids.
 
To make the scarecrow craft (and totally sneak math into this Fall craft):


Scarecrow Craft for Kids

First, snip the Goldenrod cardstock into long strips about 1/2 inch wide.  Cutting the cardstock in long cutting lines is an excellent exercise in scissor skills.  The cardstock provides a thicker resistance than construction or printer paper.  This added resistance provides feedback to kids who are working on line awareness and smooth cutting lines.  
 
You can draw lines on the cardstock with a pencil/pen, or if the child needs more assistance with scissor skills, make the lines with a thick marker.  Cutting the long strips of cardstock require the child to open/shut the scissors with smooth cutting strokes as they cut along the lines.  Cutting all of the hair straw strands for the scarecrow craft is quite an exercise in scissor skills!
 
Next, you’ll have the child cut a large circle from the Ivory Cardstock.  We used a bowl and traced a circle, but you could also have the child draw their own circle.  This will become the face of the scarecrow.  Cutting a circle with smooth cutting strokes is a more difficult task for children than cutting strait lines.  Kids may need verbal and physical prompts to cut along the curved line with accuracy.
 
You can draw a hat-ish shape from the brown paper bag.  I say hat-ISH because a scarecrow often has a floppy and battered hat on his head, so a hat shape that looks mostly like a hat is just about perfect for this scarecrow craft!  
 
Kids can cut the hat shape and may require more assistance with this part.  Cutting a material like a brown paper bag is more difficult than cutting regular printer paper, so the flimsy-ness of the paper requires more skill and accuracy with scissor control and line awareness.  
 
Jagged lines make this scarecrow look authentic, though, so feel free to add more snips and cuts into the hat, too!
 
Make this Scarecrow craft this Fall and practice math facts and addition or subtraction.  This is perfect for second grade math or any preschool or elementary age student, and a fantastic scissor skill exercise for kids.
 
Next, you will crumble up the paper hat shape.  My daughter really got into this part. “Crumble up this paper?? Awwww Yeah!”
 
Crumbling paper is a great fine motor strengthening exercise for children.  They really strengthen the intrinsic muscles of their hands with paper crumpling.  What a workout this scarecrow craft is!
 
Glue the hat in place on the scarecrow’s head.

 

Make this Scarecrow craft this Fall and practice math facts and addition or subtraction.  This is perfect for second grade math or any preschool or elementary age student, and a fantastic scissor skill exercise for kids.
 

Scarecrow Math Craft

 
To make the hair of the scarecrow, glue the goldenrod strips on the head and along the hat.  Cut a triangle from the orange cardstock for the scarecrow’s nose.  Use buttons, paper scraps, and ribbons to dress up your scarecrow, adding eyes, mouth, and any other decorations.  We received the buttons we used to make the eyes from our pals at www.craftprojectideas.com.  Add a smile and your scarecrow is ready to decorate walls and doorways this Fall!
 
But wait!  Make this cute scarecrow into a Math activity that the kids will Fall in love with.  Yep, I went there.
 


Place Value Craft

To incorporate math into this scarecrow craft, use those paper strips.  We made this activity perfect for practicing second grade addition skills.  
 
My second grader has been working on building numbers up to 1000.  On the strips, I wrote a three digit number on the end of many of the paper strips.  She then chose different ways to describe that number.  She wrote out the number in words on some strips.  
 
On other strips, she built the three digit number using Common Core strategies.  For example, I wrote the number 421 on one strip.  She demonstrated how to “build” that number by writing “400 + 20 + 1”.  This technique helped her practice skills she’s learned at school while understanding what makes up a three digit number.  She was able to identify the hundreds, tens, and ones in a three digit number.  Work on and discuss place value and number order with this activity.
 

The nice thing about this scarecrow craft is that you can adjust the math to fit any age…or just make the craft without the math facts for a super cute Fall Scarecrow!

 
Make this Scarecrow craft this Fall and practice math facts and addition or subtraction.  This is perfect for second grade math or any preschool or elementary age student, and a fantastic scissor skill exercise for kids.
 

Scarecrow Math Tips

How can you make this Math Scarecrow Craft work for your child’s needs?  Try these ideas:
 
  • Adjust the activity slightly by working on math facts.  Write a number on the end of the strip and ask your child to write the addition or subtraction problem on the length of the hair.
  • Write the SAME number on the end of each strip.  Ask your child to write each strip with different math addition problems that make up different ways to reach the number.  For example, write the number 16 on each strip.  Your child can write 8+8 on one strip, and other strips with 10+6, 12+4, 20-4, etc.

 

More Scarecrow Activities

Looking for more scarecrow activities? Below are scarecrow activities for kids that cover a variety of areas: math, language arts, art, and more. 
 
Stop by and see what our friends have come up with using this week’s Scarecrow theme:

Free Scarecrow Expanded Form Memory Game – Work on more scarecrow math with this activity and game from Life Over C’s. 
 
Scarecrow Syllables for Second Grade – Use a scarecrow activity to help with early literacy skills in this creative scarecrow activity from Look! We’re Learning! 
  
Scarecrow Measures – Another scarecrow math activity, this one from Crafty Kids at Home is a fun addition to a Fall themed learning plan. 
 
Scarecrow Silhouette Art Project – A Scarecrow craft that the kids will love is fun to add to your therapy plan. Use this idea from School Time Snippets. 
 
Scarecrow Compound Word Match Game – Work on more literacy using this idea from Creative Family Fun.
 
Scarecrow Craft with Landscape Another scarecrow craft the kids will love, use this one from Sallie Borrink Learning to work on scissor skills, too.
 

More of our Creative Math ideas:

 Commutative Property of Addition  How to Add with Regrouping  Use play dough in math  Bottle caps in first grade math
 

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    Ghost Craft to Work on Scissor Skills

    Looking for ideas to work on scissor skills? Do you need a quick craft idea to add to your therapy line up to address skills like scissor use, bilateral coordination, hand strength, or visual motor skills? This Ghost Craft is a fun Halloween craft idea that kids can do while boosting the skills they need for scissor skills and other fine motor skills. Use this ghost craft idea to work on occupational therapy activities and OT goal areas in a fun and festive way, perfect for Fall activities and ghost theme therapy ideas! Here is another quick and fun ghost craft that will boost those fine motor skills. 

    Use this ghost craft to work on scissor skills with kids, the perfect halloween craft for a ghost theme occupational therapy activity that boosts fine motor skills and scissor use including bilateral coordination and the visual motor skills needed for cutting with scissors.

    Ghost Craft to Work on Scissor Skills

    This scissor skills craft is an easy craft to set up and one that you can pull together in in no time, making it a nice craft for on-the-go school based OTs looking for a ghost themed craft that addresses OT goal areas. Kiddos will love this ghost craft as it’s a cute craft idea that is motivating. In fact, kids won’t even realize they are working on skills like hand strength, separation of the sides of the hand, arch development, scissor use, or bilateral coordination. 
    Here are more bilateral coordination activities that you can try.

    Kids will love this ghost craft for a halloween craft that works on scissor skills in kids.

    Ghost Craft for Kids

    To create this ghost craft and work on scissor skills as well as fine motor skills, you will need only a few materials (affiliate links are included below):
    Paper or cardstock
    Marker
    Scissors (These scissors are therapist-approved!)
    Hole Punch Here is a reduced effort hole punch, perfect for kids or those working on building hand strength.
    Kids can make this ghost craft to work on scissor skills and hand strength with a ghost theme this halloween, the fun ghost craft that helps kids cut with scissors.
    First, it’s important to talk about where to start with know what a child can benefit from when it comes to paper type (construction paper, printer paper, cardstock, and other paper types all play important parts in addressing needs in scissor skills. Read about the various paper choices in addressing scissor skills in our scissor skills crash course
    In that crash course, you’ll also find information related to line thickness when it comes to teaching kids to move through the stages of scissor skills. 
    Use this ghost craft to work on scissor skills and other fine motor skills, perfect for a halloween craft or ghost theme in occupational therapy activities.

    Steps to Make a Ghost Craft and Work on Scissor Skills

    To make this ghost craft (and boost those scissor skills), simply draw a semi circle on the edge of a piece of paper. 
    Ask kids to cut out out the ghost craft along the curved line. You can draw visual cues on the paper to cue kids on where to hold the paper as they turn the paper while cutting.
    Next, draw or ask the child to draw circles for the mouth and two eyes. They can then use the hole punch to punch holes inside the circles of the eyes and mouth. 
    This ghost craft works on scissor skills and fine motor skills needed for cutting with scissors, using a ghost theme for halloween craft ideas in occupational therapy activities.


    Graded Scissor Skills Craft

    There are several ways to grade this ghost craft to make the craft easier or more difficult depending on the child’s needs:
    • Use lighter or heavier paper grades. Some ideas are tissue paper, newspaper, wrapping paper, paper towels, or coffee filters to make the craft more difficult. Some ideas to make the ghost craft easier include cardstock, manilla folders, poster board, or thin cardboard.
    • Add more details to the ghost craft such as a bottom that the child needs to cut along a 90 degree angle to cut the bottom of the ghost. 
    • Add a wavy line to the bottom to require more details and scissor movement. 
    • Make larger or smaller ghosts.
    Looking for more scissor skills crafts? Try these: 
    Kids will love this fun ghost craft in occupational therapy activities this fall, use this ghost craft idea to work on scissor skills and other fine motor skills in occupational therapy activities.

    Use scissors and a hole punch to work on the fine motor skills and scissor skills with this ghost craft.