Sun Visual Perception Activity

sun visual perception activities

Working on visual perceptual skills with kids this summer? This sun visual perception activity is a fun way to build skills needed for handwriting and reading! It’s a free therapy slide deck that builds skills like visual discrimination, form constancy, and visual figure-ground.

Sun visual perception activity and free slide deck

Sun Visual Perception Activity

Summertime doesn’t have to mean not working on specific skills that help kids to improve functional hand writing and learning tasks. It also doesn’t mean building visual perceptual skills requires boring worksheets either.

This free visual perceptual activity has a sun and sunshine theme for summer days.

The visual perception sun activities include visual discrimination, form constancy, visual attention, and visual memory tasks.

Kids can work on form constancy as they recognize differences in the various sun images and activities.

You’ll love adding this these other visual perceptual activities too:

Sunshine Visual perceptual activities

There are several visual perceptual activities with the sun theme on the slide decks.

This is also great if kids are heading off to vacation or taking a break from therapy for a while. They can use the activity as a fun way to work on specific visual perceptual skills.

Want to access this free therapy slide deck? Enter your email address into the form below and to receive this activity.

FREE Sun Visual Perception Activity Slide Deck

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    Working on building skills this summer? The Summer OT Bundle is for you!

    Summer occupational therapy activities bundle

    Work on fine motor skills, visual perception, visual motor skills, sensory tolerance, handwriting, scissor skills, and much more so that kids can accomplish self-care tasks, learn, and grow through play all summer long.

    This bundle is perfect for the pediatric occupational therapist who needs resources and tools to use in summer therapy sessions, home programs, or extended school year therapy plans.

    This bundle is perfect for parents, grandparents, and caregivers looking to provide developmental fine motor activities designed to help kids build skills.

    • Send kids back to school in the Fall without worrying about the “Summer Slide”.
    • Use these materials to work on areas like hand strength, fine motor development, scissor skills, handwriting, pencil control, pencil grasp, sensory play experiences, and much more. Just pull out the pages or activities you need for your child, and develop skills through play!

    The Summer OT Bundle includes 19 resources that you can print and use over and over again:

    Helping children develop and achieve functional skills this summer was never so easy (or fun!)

    Be sure to grab the Summer OT Bundle, a HUGE resource of therapy tools and activities for all things building skills this summer.

    Grab the Summer OT Bundle here.

    Colleen Beck, OTR/L is an occupational therapist with 20 years experience, graduating from the University of Pittsburgh in 2000. Colleen created The OT Toolbox to inspire therapists, teachers, and parents with easy and fun tools to help children thrive. As the creator, author, and owner of the website and its social media channels, Colleen strives to empower those serving kids of all levels and needs. Want to collaborate? Send an email to contact@theottoolbox.com.

    How to Teach Coloring Skills

    How to teach coloring skills to kids

    Today I have another exciting resource…all about how to teach coloring skills to kids. So often, children do not have the exposure to crayons and paper that is needed for development of fine motor skills or visual motor skills. Teaching coloring skills is just not something parents think about in many cases! Let’s break down coloring skills by age and address specific tips to teach coloring to children.

    Tips for how to teach coloring skills to kids based on child development.

    Coloring is such an important part of childhood and growing up. There are many benefits to coloring as a tool for building skills. Coloring develops hand strength, visual perceptual skills, and precision of grasp. It’s the first time many of us express creativity and produce something we are proud of. It boosts confidence, develops understanding of cause and effect, and increases attention spans.

    Coloring is also an important stage of child development, too.

    Did you know that drawing is also an integral part of many early childhood skills like pre-writing development, fine motor skills, and spatial reasoning?

    Let’s go into age-appropriate specifics on how to teach coloring skills at each age and stage, from babies, to toddlers, to preschool, to Pre-K, to elementary aged children.

    How to teach coloring skills

    Coloring can be hard for kids. Many times, you see kids that refuse to color. Other times you come across kids that prefer markers over crayons. There are reasons for these difficulties, that make sense developmentally. Let’s take a look at the reasons why kids hate to color.

    • Coloring is HARD!
    • It hurts the child’s hands to color
    • Coloring makes the child’s hands tired
    • Child prefers markers over crayons
    • Coloring in the lines is hard
    • It’s hard to finish a coloring page

    All of these reasons why kids hate to color are related…and many times, it comes back to a need for developing hand strength and underlying skills.

    Coloring is hard for kids for many reasons. Here are underlying skills needed for coloring.

    Skills needed for coloring

    There are several areas, or underlying skills that play an important role in coloring:

    • Arch development (for endurance to color in the object)
    • Hand strength to move the crayon against a resistive surface
    • Pinch and grip
    • Precision to move the crayon with the fingers instead of the whole arm/wrist
    • Line awareness/visual perceptual skills
    • Eye-hand coordination
    • Pencil grasp (to hold the crayon)
    • Previous experience with fine motor activities/fine motor skill development

    Fine motor skills and coloring- In order to hold a crayon, children need to develop fine motor skills. In order to color in a shape, hand strength is needed. In order to color within the lines, visual motor skills are needed. In order to color a whole shape or figure, distal mobility is needed.

    Activities to develop these skills include fine motor play, beading, tweezer use, working on a vertical surface can develop these skills.

    Line awareness and coloring– Another aspect of coloring is the line awareness to color within the lines. And, before a child can form letters with ease and fluency, they need to achieve pre-writing lines such as strait lines, squares, triangles, X and diagonals. This resource on line awareness can be a great starting point on this visual perceptual skills needed to color within the lines. Also try these tips to work on line awareness needed for coloring.

    Pencil grasp and coloring– In order to teach coloring skills, it is important to progress through the stages listed below, whether at age level or not. Just like the underlying skills needed for pencil grasp development or handwriting, the basic levels need to be achieved. Before a child can hold a pencil with a functional grasp, they need to progress through more primitive grasp patterns such as a pincer grasp, palmer supinate grasp, digital pronate grasp, and quadrupod or static tripod grasp.

    All of these underlying skills play an important role in how to teach coloring skills to kids!

    How to teach coloring skills at each age depends on child development. These tips for teaching kids to color can help.

    Coloring Skills By Age

    In this post we will break down the coloring skills you can expect a child to do dependent on age. You will see that we break them down into age ranges – for good reason, too. Every child will develop different skills and different times. Generally, though, there is a developmental path that the majority of children will follow.

    If you believe that your child is lagging behind in these skills, talk to your child’s health care team and let them know what you see in your child. They will direct you towards occupational therapy if it is right for your family! 

    Coloring Skills at BIRTH – 6 MONTHS

    Not much coloring going on in this time frame, as you may imagine! Instead, your little one is prepping those little fingers to hold and manipulate objects, that will one day lead to purposeful scribbling

    I always recommend allowing your child to explore coloring as soon as they are able to hold a crayon in their hand and sit up safely in a high chair. Be sure to stay with your baby the whole time you are offering coloring opportunities, as they will likely put their crayons in their mouth. 

    Support the development of Coloring Skills during infancy:

    Babies under six months will typically grasp a small object in the middle or pinky-side of their palm. This grasp pattern is strengthening the building blocks for more refined grasps down the road. Tummy time is a great tool for lengthening the ulnar side of the hand for strengthening so that endurance in fine motor tasks is achievable at older ages. Tummy time also supports arch development even at this young age.

    While most parents of new babies will not be thinking of coloring, these activities support the development of MANY motor and cognitive skills, and not just coloring!

    Coloring Skills before 1 year

    From 6 months to 12 months, babies are certainly not coloring. However, they ARE developing motor and visual skills needed for holding and marking with a crayon in the later years.

    Grasping patterns grow a lot during this time! Your baby will start to use their thumbs a little bit more while stacking blocks, be able to pick up their Cheerios with only their thumb and pointer finger (pincer grasp), and can point to objects with one finger. By 12 months old, we should see a pincer grasp while holding small objects. This grasp prepares little fingers for sustained coloring!

    Support the development of Coloring Skills during In babies:

    Around a year old, your little one may show more interest in scribbling. They will likely make large marks across the paper (and hopefully not the walls!) by using their whole arm to move their crayon. As they develop, you will see that those big movements will get smaller and smaller as fine motor skills are refined.  

    Grasp: On a coloring utensil, they will use a gross grasp that looks like a fist. 

    Resources and information on how to teach toddlers to color.

    Coloring Skills for Toddlers

    The toddler years, for from 12 months to 2 years, is a great window to introduce coloring. It’s during this age that toddlers show interest in coloring and develop skills needed for motor development. This is a great time to explore how to teach coloring skills at an impressionable age!

    During the 12 month to two year range, toddlers are building proficiency in coloring skills…and this is a great time to teach coloring!

    In this time frame, your toddler will begin to recognize colors and shapes in their environment, and may purposefully choose colors while they are scribbling on paper. They will start to hold their crayon or marker a little more gently, with their pinky down towards the paper, and all fingers wrapped around. 

    Teach Toddlers to Color:

    During the toddler years, exposure is key! You can present many activities and coloring opportunities to color with crayons. Different types of crayons and coloring activities are great exposure, too. Here are tips to teach toddlers to color:

    • Offer just one crayon at first. Offering too many options can overwhelm the young child.
    • Try different crayon types. There are different crayon molds that are great for toddlers including egg shaped crayons, rock shaped crayons, or even bath crayons.
    • Try coloring materials that require less hand strength or resistance, to make a mark. Kwik Stick tempera paints are a great option.
    • Show toddlers how to color. Color alongside young children for an opportunity to connect with the child and interact. Toddlers love to mimic others and can learn a lot by watching their parent color alongside them.
    • Offer toddler-friendly coloring pages. A big coloring book with many details can overwhelm a child. Try a printed page with simple shapes in smaller sizes.
    • Don’t expect perfection. Just putting crayons to the page is a great learning experience that builds hand strength, eye-hand coordination, and coloring experience.
    • Expect whole-arm movements. Toddlers color with their shoulder and elbow movements, or the proximal movements and won’t color with precise movements of the fingers until an older age. This is normal and to be expected. Coloring for toddlers looks like scribbling and that’s OK!
    • Encourage coloring and mark-making with coloring games and toys. This post has games and toys for coloring that Toddlers will love.
    • Work on fine motor hand skills through games involving tweezers, games on the floor, gross motor play, and whole body play activities.
    • Encourage play with age-appropriate puzzles and blocks.

    Your child may start to show more interest in coloring just like you do, trying to copy your marks and paying closer attention to where they are placing their pen to paper. They should be able to copy a vertical line by around age two – this is a key marker for pre-writing skills. Usually around this time they also choose a preferred hand dominance while coloring! 

    The typical grasp pattern used by toddlers is the Palmar supinate grasp. This is a normal part of development. 

    Tips and strategies to teach preschoolers to color. Includes information for younger preschoolers and Pre-K.

    Coloring Skills for Preschool (2-3 years)

    The early preschool years, or 2- 3 years of age are a prime range for developing beginning coloring skills.

    Your young preschool child will start to shift their fingers towards the paper while they hold their coloring utensil by age three. Some children hold their pencil towards the top near the eraser during this stage of development. They should naturally work their fingers down the utensil, closer to the paper, as they get used to this new grasp. 

    Use these strategies to teach young preschoolers to color:

    During the 2-3 year period, you can expect your child to start drawing meaningful images. They will point to a drawing that may look like nothing to you, but then they will tell you that it’s their dog! By age three, your child should be able to do the next pre-writing task: copy a horizontal line and a circle. 

    Teach Preschoolers to Color (2-3 years old):

    For young preschoolers, continued exposure to coloring is necessary. So often, young children skip the needed PLAY that builds fine and gross motor skills. With more and more young children playing primarily on screens versus free play, independent play, and creative fine motor play that builds the necessary hand strength, mobility, dexterity needed for precision, endurance, and progression through typical grasp patterns. Children at the preschool stages need fine motor play, much less screen time exposure, and play experiences.

    Another pet peeve of pediatric occupational therapists is the tendency to hand a young child a pencil or pen during the preschool years.

    • Continue with the suggestions listed above for the baby stage.
    • Use a variety of crayon types and sizes: regular crayons, finger crayons, egg-shaped crayons, rock crayons, jumbo crayons, bath crayons,
    • Don’t be afraid to use broken crayons. Sounds strange, right? Sometimes a whole crayon is too big for small hands. A broken crayon can be the “just right” size and can be used as a strengthening tool for fine motor skills as well.
    • Don’t expect perfection. Crayon lines will go over the border of the coloring area and that’s ok!
    • Offer small coloring spaces with wider borders.
    • Provide simple shapes for coloring opportunities.
    • Offer physical boundaries if needed: Use wikki sticks around the coloring area, use your hands to create a small coloring space.
    • Color small areas on an easel to engage the core as a stabilizer, work against gravity, to place the wrist into extension, to pull the fingers into a tripod type of grasp for dexterity.
    • Continue easel work and play with lite brite, painting on easels, sticking and peeling tape to the wall, sticking foam pieces to a wet easel surface.
    • Play with foam sheets on a window. Try this rainbow play activity where preschoolers can stick foam sheets to a wet window. Encourage use of a spray bottle to wet the window and then wipe with a towel to clean up any drips. (It’s a great way to teach colors to preschoolers, too!)
    • Draw with chalk on a vertical chalk board or on a driveway/side walk.
    • Try window paints.
    • Try coloring materials that require less hand strength or resistance, to make a mark. Kwik Stick tempera paints are a great option.
    • Show toddlers how to color. Color alongside young children for an opportunity to connect with the child and interact. Toddlers love to mimic others and can learn a lot by watching their parent color alongside them.

    The typical grasp pattern used by young preschool children in the 2-3 year age range is the Digital pronate grasp. Use of this grasp pattern is a typical stage of grasp development.

    Coloring Skills in Preschool (4-5 years)

    During the later preschool years, at four and five years of age, preschoolers are developing more refined coloring skills as their motor and visual develop integrate.

    Around age four is when you can start to see recognizable images appear more regularly in your child’s artwork. Four-year-olds will usually draw people with two, three, or four body parts. For example, the person may have a circle for a head, a rectangle for the body, and two circles for feet.

    By the time they are five, they will likely be drawing people with six or more body parts! You will see their drawings becoming more and more life-like, by adding details like fingers, eye color, and buttons on clothing. 

    By age four, we expect a child to be able to copy a cross – a very tricky visual motor skill! Around age five, we would expect a child to be able to copy a square and color inside the lines fairly well. 

    Teach Preschoolers to Color (4-5 years old):

    For older preschoolers, especially those in Pre-K, it can be common to see preschools and pre-K classrooms where young children are expected to write letters, write their name, or trace letters. This is potentially damaging for the young child and not recommended by pediatric occupational therapists. This premature exposure to writing with pencils, tracing letters, and writing letters isn’t based on child development of motor skills.

    It will result in forming letters incorrectly and establishing poor motor plans for letters. It will result in poor pencil grasps that are difficult to change. It will result in forming letters from the bottom or in “chunks”. It is a detriment to children, especially because there is little time in the kindergarten classroom for working on letter formation, pencil grasp instruction beyond the regular curriculum. So changing motor plans and muscle memory that has been poorly established is detrimental for the young child.

    What preschool and Pre-K children at 4 and 5 years of age need is play and the opportunity to develop and refine fine motor skills, hand strength, eye-hand coordination, visual motor skills. These skills are strengthened through play.

    Try these strategies to teach older preschoolers/Pre-K children to color:

    • Use all of the strategies previously listed above.
    • Encourage coloring with interest-based coloring pages (run a Google search for coloring pages, i.e. “unicorn coloring pages”, “superhero coloring pages”, etc. You can generally find free printable coloring pages in most themes.)
    • Show off art work! Create a space in the home or clinic where coloring projects can be displayed. This is a great motivator for many children.
    • Encourage smaller coloring areas to improve eye-hand coordination with line use. A smaller coloring space enables children to use their fingers to move the crayon rather than the wrist, elbow, or shoulder.
    • Use a smaller or broken crayon to promote a developmentally appropriate quadripod or static tripod grasp.
    • Use simple shapes with curved lines like circles and ovals to promote smooth coloring lines with minimal direction changes and angles to the coloring picture.
    • If children are complaining of tired hands or tend to switch crayon colors a lot, it can be a sign of weakness in the hands. To strengthen the hands, encourage play with tweezers, tongs, spray bottles, pinch and grip activities, LEGO blocks, play dough, beading activities, peg boards, etc.
    • If you have a box of crayons with a crayon sharpener on the back, encourage the child to use it to sharpen crayons. The built-in sharpener is great for not only sharpening dull crayons, but also as a hand strengthening device!

    The typical grasp pattern in preschool years for 4-5 year olds is the quadrupod or static tripod grasp. Use of either of these grasps is part of typical grasp development.  

    Information and tools to teach elementary kids to color.

    Coloring Skills at 5-6 years old

    Somewhere between ages five and six, we would expect a child to be able to copy multiple shapes, including the ones they would have mastered in the past (i.e. vertical, horizontal, and crossed lines).

    Around age five we would like to see what is called a dynamic tripod grasp when a child is writing or coloring. They should have their pencil between their pointer finger and thumb, with the middle finger supporting and the ring and pinky fingers tucked away into the palm. This grasp is “dynamic” if the fingers can move separately from the palm and wrist, allowing for good control of the writing utensil. This growing strength and control is why we see handwriting and coloring skills develop!

    By age six, they should be able to copy more complex shapes, like triangles and rhombuses. You could expect them to independently draw some of the more simple shapes as well, like circles and squares. 

    The dynamic tripod grasp is the most advanced pencil grasp and should continue throughout their life. Typically, whatever grasp a child has habituated by age 6 is the grasp they will likely continue to have. 

    Teach kids to color at 5-6 years:

    Try these strategies to teach children aged 5-6 years old children to color:

    • Use all of the strategies listed above under preschool, older preschool, etc.
    • Color using a variety of surfaces and mediums.
    • Color using squeeze paints to work on hand strength.
    • If hand strength is a challenge and the 5-6 year old complains of hand fatigue, try a less resistive coloring tool such as twist crayons.
    • Work on coloring larger areas for longer periods of time.
    • Use raised line borders if needed, including Wikki Stix or dry glue to border the coloring area.
    • Try a 3 crayon challenge.
    • Highlight the line with a marker.  A bright color can be a visual cue of where to write.  Letters should rest on the line.  You can start with a nice thick and brightly colored highlighter like this one and move to a thinner pen like these ones. Sometimes the visual cue of that bright line is enough to keep letters placed correctly.
    • Another strategy to work on line awareness in coloring is to add bolder coloring shape lines with more contrast by darkening the borders with a black marker. Simply outline the shape with a black marker for a visual prompt.
    • For kids that show a great deal of difficulty with coloring in a given space, use a stencil made from a thing cardboard like a recycled cereal box.  Cut out a rectangle and place it over the given writing space.  This will help to remove distractions of the rest of the page and proved a designated space to color within.
    • Use glue to trace along the outside border of the coloring space. Let the glue dry and then use that tactile border as a physical prompt for coloring lines.

    The typical grasp pattern for 5-6 year olds is a tripod/dynamic tripod grasp.

    Coloring Skills at SIX YEARS OLD AND BEYOND

    Older children can sometimes struggle with coloring and see their peers who seem to have little trouble at all. This can be a stab at their confidence and self-esteem. For older children, coloring often-times is a “sometimes” task in the classroom, so there are limited opportunities for a hands-on fine motor task. Still older students use primarily colored pencils to color in the classroom. Coloring with colored pencils requires even more hand strength, precision, and mobility with the pencil, so this can be a challenge.

    Try these strategies for teaching older kids coloring skills:

    • To teach coloring skills to older children, use all of the methods mentioned under each age level above.
    • Your elementary-aged child will continue to develop fine motor skills for writing and coloring, as well as manipulating other craft media like clay, papier mache, etc. Creating things with their hands will not only strengthen their muscles but will also benefit their social development, self-esteem, and problem solving skills.
    • Work on coloring with a variety of crayon types, markers, or paint pens.
    • Use a variety of coloring surfaces.
    • If crayon pressure or colored pencil pressure is a problem, try these strategies to address pressure on the writing utensil.
    • Use a coloring journal or a drawing journal.
    • Use interest-based coloring books or coloring pages.

    A final note on teaching coloring skills

    If wondering exactly how to teach coloring skills to children at various ages is something you are looking for developmentally appropriate strategies, this comprehensive resource is for you. Coloring is a child occupation needed for learning, interactive play, and creative play.

    Encourage your kids at all stages of development to explore their creativity and the fine motor, visual motor, cognitive and socioemotional skills will follow. 

    References

    Dosman, C. F., Andrews, D., & Goulden, K. J. (2012). Evidence-based milestone ages as a framework for developmental surveillance. Paediatrics & Child Health,17(10), 561–568. https://doi.org/10.1093/pch/17.10.561

    Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. (n.d.). Milestone moments: Learn the signs. Act early. Retrieved from: https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/actearly/pdf/parents_pdfs/milestonemomentseng508.pdf 

    How to Teach Coloring Skills is a collaborative article by Colleen Beck, OTR/L and Sydney Rearick, OTS.

    Colleen Beck, OTR/L is an occupational therapist with 20 years experience, graduating from the University of Pittsburgh in 2000. Colleen created The OT Toolbox to inspire therapists, teachers, and parents with easy and fun tools to help children thrive. As the creator, author, and owner of the website and its social media channels, Colleen strives to empower those serving kids of all levels and needs. Want to collaborate? Send an email to contact@theottoolbox.com.

    Sydney Rearick, OTS, is an occupational therapy graduate student at Concordia University Wisconsin. Her background is in Human Development and Family Studies, and she is passionate about meeting your family’s needs. After working as a nanny for the last decade, Sydney is prepared to handle just about anything an infant, toddler, or child could throw at her. She is also a newly established children’s author and illustrator and is always working on new and exciting projects.

    Colors Handwriting Kit

    Rainbow Handwriting Kit– This resource pack includes handwriting sheets, write the room cards, color worksheets, visual motor activities, and so much more. The handwriting kit includes:

    • Write the Room, Color Names: Lowercase Letters
    • Write the Room, Color Names: Uppercase Letters
    • Write the Room, Color Names: Cursive Writing
    • Copy/Draw/Color/Cut Color Worksheets
    • Colors Roll & Write Page
    • Color Names Letter Size Puzzle Pages
    • Flip and Fill A-Z Letter Pages
    • Colors Pre-Writing Lines Pencil Control Mazes
    • This handwriting kit now includes a bonus pack of pencil control worksheets, 1-10 fine motor clip cards, visual discrimination maze for directionality, handwriting sheets, and working memory/direction following sheet! Valued at $5, this bonus kit triples the goal areas you can work on in each therapy session or home program.

    Click here to get your copy of the Colors Handwriting Kit.

    Colleen Beck, OTR/L is an occupational therapist with 20 years experience, graduating from the University of Pittsburgh in 2000. Colleen created The OT Toolbox to inspire therapists, teachers, and parents with easy and fun tools to help children thrive. As the creator, author, and owner of the website and its social media channels, Colleen strives to empower those serving kids of all levels and needs. Want to collaborate? Send an email to contact@theottoolbox.com.

    Ocean Animals Matching Game

    ocean animals matching game

    Matching games are such a great way to work on visual perceptual skills that are needed for hand writing and reading. This ocean animals matching game is a therapy activity that helps kids to work on several visual perceptual skills including visual discrimination form constancy visual scanning and other skills. Add this idea to your summer occupational therapy line-up!

    Ocean animals matching game to work on visual perceptual skills

    Ocean animals Matching Game

    This is a great activity for an ocean theme this summer.

    Kids that love ocean animals like fish seahorses seahorses octopus and see turtles will get love working on this spotting game.

    To play children can look at the two circles on the slide deck. They can visually scan to locate the identical ocean animal that is the same on each part of the slide. Then the interactive piece of this game is a movable seaweed option. They can click and drag on the seaweed icon and drag it over to cover up the matching animals. By doing this interactive piece kids can improve eye hand coordination and visual tracking skills as well.

    Ocean animals writing prompts

    Then after the students find the matching ocean animal there is a slide that is a self-checking exercise. The slide asks “did you find the missing item?” and then offers an ocean animals writing prompt.

    On the handwriting portion of this ocean animals activity kids can copy the ocean animals word from the slide.

    They can work on letter formation and copying skills from a near point or a distance point.

    There’s also an open ended writing prompt where kids can copy a full sentence.

    You can then expand the activity to an open ended writing prompt by asking that student to expand on that topic or ocean animal.

    For example kids can copy the word octopus and work on letter formation letter size and spacing between letters. Then they can copy the octopus sentence. They can work on spacing between letters and words, letter formation, line use, punctuation, capitalization, and overall legibility.

    Then finally expand on the activity and ask students to continue to write about an octopus they can either write a silly sentence or another fact if they know one. This slide deck includes many ocean animals that kids will have fun finding and writing about. Other ocean animals included in this slide deck include:

    • seahorse
    • sea turtle
    • crab
    • puffer fish
    • octopus
    • jellyfish
    • whale
    • shark
    • conch shell
    • school of fish

    Sometimes kids will have difficulties copying or reading without losing their place on the paper. Convergence insufficiency can be one cause for this. Other reasons can be visual scanning or visual attention skills. This slide deck is one way to work on these skills.

    Copying from a near point is a great way to work on visual shift visual attention and visual memory skills that are needed for kids to copy words from a workbook onto paper or from some other source like a book into a notebook.

    By shifting the slides to an overhead screen such as a SmartBoard that is positioned across the room children can work on distance copying. This visual motor skill can be a challenge for some kids who struggle with visual attention and visual memory. In order to copy from a source children need to visually recall where they left off and then shift their vision while holding the visual information in there our minds eye and then realizing where to go back to on the board to copy from. That shift can be difficult for kids so this open ended and fun activity can help with visual motor skills and copying from near and far points.

    This matching game is similar to others that we have here on the website so if a spotting and matching game is an interest and helpful for you and the children that you serve check out these other spotting and matching activities:

    Want more ways to play and build skills with a beach or ocean theme? Check out these fun ideas:

    Want more ways to play and build skills with a beach or ocean theme? Check out these fun ideas:

    Free Ocean Animals Matching Slide Deck

    Would you like to access this free ocean animals activity to work on visual perceptual skills, eye-hand coordination, and handwriting? Enter your email into that form below and you can access this resource to use in teletherapy sessions in home programming in face-to-face therapy sessions or in homeschooling activities. Another option is to also use for hand writing prompts in the classroom.

    FREE Ocean Animals Matching Game

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      Working on building skills this summer? The Summer OT Bundle is for you!

      Summer occupational therapy activities bundle

      Work on fine motor skills, visual perception, visual motor skills, sensory tolerance, handwriting, scissor skills, and much more so that kids can accomplish self-care tasks, learn, and grow through play all summer long.

      This bundle is perfect for the pediatric occupational therapist who needs resources and tools to use in summer therapy sessions, home programs, or extended school year therapy plans.

      This bundle is perfect for parents, grandparents, and caregivers looking to provide developmental fine motor activities designed to help kids build skills.

      • Send kids back to school in the Fall without worrying about the “Summer Slide”.
      • Use these materials to work on areas like hand strength, fine motor development, scissor skills, handwriting, pencil control, pencil grasp, sensory play experiences, and much more. Just pull out the pages or activities you need for your child, and develop skills through play!

      The Summer OT Bundle includes 19 resources that you can print and use over and over again:

      Helping children develop and achieve functional skills this summer was never so easy (or fun!)

      Be sure to grab the Summer OT Bundle, a HUGE resource of therapy tools and activities for all things building skills this summer.

      Grab the Summer OT Bundle here.

      Colleen Beck, OTR/L is an occupational therapist with 20 years experience, graduating from the University of Pittsburgh in 2000. Colleen created The OT Toolbox to inspire therapists, teachers, and parents with easy and fun tools to help children thrive. As the creator, author, and owner of the website and its social media channels, Colleen strives to empower those serving kids of all levels and needs. Want to collaborate? Send an email to contact@theottoolbox.com.

      Kindergarten Learning and Play Activities

      kindergarten activities

      Below are kindergarten activities that promote development of skills needed during the kindergarten year. These are great activities to use for kindergarten readiness and to help preschool and Pre-K children build the motor skills in order to succeed in their kindergarten year. You’ll find kindergarten letter activities, Kinder math, fine motor skills to build stronger pencil grasps when kindergarteners start to write with a pencil and cut with scissors. You’ll also find kindergarten sight word activities for when that time of the Kinder year comes around. Let’s have some fun with 5-6 year old activities!

      Kindergarten activities and kindergarten readiness activities

      Kindergarten Activities

       What you’ll notice is missing from this massive list of Kindergarten activities, is handwriting, writing letters, and even writing names. (And writing letters in a sensory bin falls into this category too! Before kindergarten, children should not be copying letters into a sensory bin. You’ll see letters formed incorrectly, letters formed from bottom to top, and letters formed in “chunks”. The same rule applies to tracing letters and words and even “multisensory strategies” for writing. It’s just too early. Unfortunately, we see a lot of preschools and standards doing the exact opposite. You’ll even find online sites sharing preschool and Pre-K writing that is just in poor advice.
       
      Here’s why: prior to kindergarten age, kids are not developmentally ready for holding a pencil, writing with a pencil, and writing words. Their muscles are not developed, and asking them to write letters, copy words, and trace with a pencil is setting them up for improper letter formation, poor pencil grasp, and weak hands. 
       
      What children aged 5 and under DO need is play! They need exposure to sensory experiences, sensory play, coloring, cutting with scissors (even if it’s just snipping), puzzles, games, beads, blocks, stamps…there are SO many ways to help pre-K kids and preschool children develop the skills they need for kindergarten and beyond.
       
      Kindergarten is such a fun age.  Kids in kindergarten strive when they are given the chance to learn through play and hands-on activities.  These are our favorite Kindergarten activities that we’ve shared on the site, with Kindergarten math, reading and letter awareness, Kindergarten Crafts, and Kindergarten Play.   
       
       

       

      Kindergarten Functional Tasks

      Kindergarten is the stage when children go off to school for perhaps the first time. That’s why prior to kindergarten, it’s great to “practice” a lot of the functional tasks that children will need to do once they go to kindergarten. Some of these may include:

      Now…not all of these functional skills will be established for every kindergarten child…and that’s OK! Kindergarten can be the year to practice these tasks in the school environment. 

      Kindergarten Letter Activities

      Kindergarten is all about letters, upper case and lower case letters, and sounds.  They learn how letters go with sounds and work on decodable reading.  These letter learning activities will help your kindergarten student with identification, sounds, and beginning reading skills.

      Kindergarten Letter activities for letter learning
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       


      Kindergarten Math Activities

      Kindergarten students work with manipulating items to discover and explore numbers and patterns.  They solve simple addition and subtraction problems, more or less, comparing amounts, and shapes.
       
      These Kindergarten math ideas will be a fun way to discover math ideas with playful learning.
      Kindergarten Math ideas

       

       
       
       
       
       
           
       




         
       
       
         
       
       
        
       
       
          
       

      Kindergarten Sight Words and Reading:

      Kindergarten students learn sight words throughout the school year. These sight word activities are fun ways to learn with play while reinforcing sight word skills.
        
       
         
       
       
         
       
       

      Sight Words Manipulatives | Outdoor Pre-Reading Letter Hunt

      Kindergarten Books and Activities

      Extending book ideas with crafts and activities are a fun way for Kindergarten students to become engaged with reading.  Listening to an adult read is a powerful tool for pre-readers.  They learn language, speech, articulation, volume, and tone of voice.  These book related activities will extend popular stories and engage your Kindergartner.

      Book ideas activities for Kindergarten
       
       
       
        
       
       
       

       
       
       

       

       

      Kindergarten Fine Motor Play

      Fine motor skills in Kindergarten students are essential for effective pencil control and handwriting, scissor use, and clothing and tool manipulation.  Kindergartners may have little experience with tools like scissors, pencils, hole punches, staplers, and pencil sharpeners. In fact, there are MANY fine motor skills needed at school. All of these items require dexterity and strength.  
       
      In-Hand manipulation play for fine motor skills: We had so much fun with water beads.  This post shares two ideas for improving in-hand manipulation skills which are so important for dexterity in self-care, handwriting, coin manipulation…and so much more!
       
      Finger isolation, tripod grasp, eye-hand coordination, bilateral hand coordination…Fine Motor Play with Crafting Pom Poms has got it all!  We even worked on color identification and sorting with this easy fine motor play activity.
       

      What play ideas can you come up with using common tools? These items are GREAT ways to build hand strength and dexterity that will be needed in kindergarten for pencil grasp development and endurance in handwriting. 

      • tweezers
      • tongs
      • beads
      • toothpicks
      • hole puncher
      • peg boards
      • lacing cards

       

      These fine motor activities will engage your student in fine motor skills for effective hand use in functional school tasks.
       
      Kindergarten Fine Motor activities
       
       
       
         
       
       
         
       
       
         
       
       
       
       
       
        
       
       

      Kindergarten Play:

      Play in Kindergarten is essential for so many areas.  Kindergartners are young students who need brain breaks from desk work.  Not only for that reason, but for turn-taking, language, social interaction, self-confidence, problem-solving, and interaction, play is an important part of your Kindergarten student’s daily lives.  

      Play builds skills! Check out this post on the incredible power of play. Play helps kids learn and develop cognitive experiences and the neural connections that impact their educational career, beginning right now! Occupational therapists know that play is the primary occupation of children, but what’s more is that play builds the very skills that kids need to learn and develop.

      Kindergarteners can gain valuable input through play:

      • Cognition
      • Problem Solving
      • Executive Functioning Skills
      • Attention
      • Strength
      • Balance
      • Visual Motor Integration
      • Visual Processing
      • Sensory Integration
      • Self Regulation
      • Language Development
      • Self-Confidence
      • Fine Motor Skills
      • Gross Motor Skills
      • Social Emotional Development
      • Stress Relief
      • Behavior
      • Imagination
      • Creativity

      Try these play ideas in the classroom or at home for fun learning (through play)!

         
       
       
       
       
         
       

      Kindergarten Crafts

      Crafts in Kindergarten are a great tool for so many areas.  Students can work on direction following, order, patterns, task completion, scissor skills, fine motor dexterity, tool use, and more by completing crafts in Kindergarten.  

      Kindergarten crafts can have one or more of the areas listed here to help and build skills:

      • Scissor practice (placing on hand and opening/closing the scissors)
      • Exposure to different textures and art supplies
      • Practice with using a glue stick and bottle of squeeze glue
      • Practice cutting strait lines and stopping at point
      • Practice cutting simple shapes
      • Practice cutting complex shapes
      • Coloring
      • Painting with finger paints and paint brushes
      • Experience washing hands after crafting
      • Opportunities for creative expression
      • Opportunities for rule-following and direction following
      • Multi-step directions
      • Experience copying a model for visual motor benefits

      Try a few (or all!) of these Kindergarten crafts for fun arts and play with your student. 

      Kindergarten Craft ideas
       
       
       
       

       

      Grand Old Duke of York Craft | Process Art Monster Cupcake Liner craft | Shoe Charm craft | Caterpillar Math Craft

       
       
       
      We’ll be adding more to this resource soon, so stop back to find more Kindergarten learning ideas.  

      Tangram Activities

      Tangram activities

      These tangram activities are designed to develop visual perceptual skills, visual motor skills, and fine motor skills in kids. Tangrams make a great addition to any occupational therapy treatment bag!

      Tangram Activities

      Tangram activities for occupational therapy interventions

      Tangrams are a great tool for learning and development.  The colorful shapes are perfect for building images and working on math skills such as shape identification and patterning.  

      Tangrams are also an easy way to incorporate visual perceptual skills, fine motor skills, and visual motor integration into play.  

      Development of visual perceptual skills is essential for tasks like reading, writing, math, movement, self-care, and many other functional tasks. These tangram activities are perfect to improve visual perception in a playful way.  You can use tangrams to address visual perception in many more ways, including ideas to help with handwriting.


      Try DIY Sponge Tangrams for another version of these activities.

      And check out these cardboard tangrams for developing visual motor integration skills.

      How to use tangrams to improve visual perception skills needed for reading, writing, and functional skills.

      This post contains affiliate links. 


      Visual perception allows us to take in visual information, process it, and use it to interpret information from our environment.  There are many parts of visual perception, but today, I’ve got three visual perceptual skills that can be developed using tangrams.  

      How to use tangrams to improve visual perception skills needed for reading, writing, and functional skills.

       

      Visual Percepetion and Tangrams

      1. Visual Discrimination allows us to determine similarities and differences based on color, shape, etch. This skill allows us to know that a 6 and a 9 are different and that a p and a q are not the same letter. 

      Use tangrams to work on visual discrimination:

      • Place tangram shapes on a piece of paper.  Ask the child to locate all of the triangles, all of the squares, etc. 
      • Ask the child to find shapes that are the same even if they are different sizes.  This tangram set has several different sizes of triangles, making it a great tool for form constancy. 
      • Use two different shapes to discuss what makes the shapes similar and different.

      2. Visual Memory allows us to retain visual information.  We need visual memory in order to copy written work.

      Use tangrams to work on visual memory:

      Use the tangrams for a hands-on game of “Simon”.  Place shapes on a piece of paper, taking turns to add one new shape at a time.  Each player should recall the previous round before adding a new tangram shape.

      Place several tangram shapes on a piece of paper.  Allow the child to stare at the shapes for a period of time.  Then, cover the shapes with a second piece of paper.  Ask the child to recall the shapes that they saw.

      3. Form Constancy is the ability to recognize shapes and forms no matter what position they are in. 
       

      Use tangrams to work on form constancy:

      • Use tangrams to build form constancy by positioning shapes in different positions.  Ask the child to locate all of the squares, quadrilaterals, etc. 
      • Position shapes on one side of a piece of paper.  On the other side of the paper, position shapes that can be combined to make the shape on the first side of the paper.  Ask the child to match up the two sides.
      • Position shapes along one side of a piece of paper.  Position matching shapes along the right side of the paper, with the shapes slightly rotated.  Ask the child to match up the shapes.   
      How to use tangrams to improve visual perception skills needed for reading, writing, and functional skills.
       
      How to use tangrams to improve visual perception skills needed for reading, writing, and functional skills.
       
       
       

      Looking for more ways to build visual perceptual skills?  Try these:

      Colleen Beck, OTR/L is an occupational therapist with 20 years experience, graduating from the University of Pittsburgh in 2000. Colleen created The OT Toolbox to inspire therapists, teachers, and parents with easy and fun tools to help children thrive. As the creator, author, and owner of the website and its social media channels, Colleen strives to empower those serving kids of all levels and needs. Want to collaborate? Send an email to contact@theottoolbox.com.

      What are Visual Spatial Relations

      spatial relations activities

      Visual Spatial Relations is an important visual perceptual skill that is important for many functional tasks.  Spatial relations allows the organization of the body in relation to objects or spatial awareness.  This is an important part of spatial awareness in handwriting and many other movement-based activities.  An important part of visual spatial relations includes laterality and directionality. In general, these spatial relationship terms refer to left-right body awareness and the ability to perceive left/right relationship of objects. 

      Spatial Relations is being aware of oneself in space. It involves positioning items in relation to oneself, such as reaching for items without overshooting or missing the object. Most of us realize as we walk through a doorway that we need to space ourselves through the middle of the door.

      Some with poor visual spatial skills may walk to closely to the sides and bump the wall. It also involves the fine motor tasks of coordinating handwriting with writing in spaces allowed on paper, placing letters within an area (lines), and forming letters in the correct direction.

      What are spatial relations?

      Spatial relations, or visual spatial awareness, refers to an organization of visual information and an awareness of position in space so the body can move and perform tasks. Spatial relations are needed for completing physical actions, moving in a crowded space, and even handwriting.

      More examples of spatial relations

      Knowing which shoe to put on which foot.  Understanding that a “b” has a bump on the right side.  Putting homework on the left side of the take home folder before putting books into a locker beside the gym bag.  Visual spatial relations are everywhere!

      Here are more everyday examples of spatial relations at work:

      • Letter formation and number formation
      • Writing letters without reversal
      • Reading letters without reversal
      • Sports
      • Completing puzzles
      • Walking in a crowded hallway without running into others
      • Standing in line without bumping into others
      • Left/right awareness
      • Understanding spatial reasoning concepts such as beside/under/next to/etc
      • Reading without losing one’s place
      • Copying written work with appropriate spatial awareness
      • Reading maps  

      Visual spatial skills in occupational therapy activities are an important skill.  

      Visual Spatial Skills and Handwriting

      Spatial relations, and the ability to organize physical movements related to visual information impacts handwriting.

      You might be thinking: “Movement and handwriting!? What?? I want my kiddo to sit still and copy his homework into his planner without wiggling all over the desk!”

      Ok, ok. Here is the thing: We are asking our kids to write way to early. Preschoolers are being given paper with lines and are asked to write their name with correct letter formation. Kids are being thrown into the classroom environment with expectations for legible written work an they are missing the necessary basics.

      When kids are not developing the skills they need to hold a pencil, establish visual perceptual skills, and organize themselves, they are going to have struggles in handwriting.

      NOTE: There are a few other baseline tools that kids need in order to establish a base for better handwriting. Fine motor experiences, positioning, attention are just a few of these areas.

      Here are a few easy hands-on strategies to help with spatial relations in written work:

      1. Read this resource on hand dominance and laterality.
      2. Then check out this post on what you need to know about writing with both hands.
      3. Finally, check out this movement activity for direction following that involves spatial relations.

      These resources are all connected and can impact spatial relations skills!

      Another resource is this post on Hand Aerobics and Fine Motor Skills Needed in the Classroom

      You can find all of our handwriting posts here.

      Spatial Relations Quick Tip:
      Write a letter on the student’s back using a finger or a pencil eraser. Ask the student guess what letter it is. Then, ask the child to air write the letter. (While holding a pencil, with large motion, whole arm motions AND very small with just the fingers!) Finally have him write the letter on paper.

      • These activities all require the ability to perceive an object in space.  The way they interpret position in space to their body and to other objects in the environment impacts motor skills.    
      • Spacing pieces of a puzzle amongst the others and writing in relation to the lines is one way to work on this skill.

      Fine Motor Quick Tip:
      Encourage pinching activities. So many kids are exposed to screen technology from a young age. Screen interaction uses the pointer finger in isolation or just the thumb. These digits become strong and a dynamic pencil grasp is limited. Promote strengthening of the intrinsic muscles by pinching clay or tearing and crumbling small bits of paper. Read more about intrinsic muscle strengthening here.

      What are visual spatial relations and how are visual relationships and visual concepts needed for functional tasks?

      Spatial Relations Activities

      Try these movement-based spatial relations activities to work on the visual spatial skills needed for writing and completing everyday tasks:

      • Create a paper obstacle course. Draw obstacles on paper and have your child make his /her pencil go through the obstacles.
      • Draw circles, holes, mud pits, and mountains for them to draw lines as their pencil “climbs”, “jumps”, “rolls”, and even erases!
      • Create an obstacle course using couch cushions, chairs, blankets, pillows to teach left/right/over/under.
      • Write words and letters on graph paper. The lines will work as a guide and also a good spacing activity.
      • Use stickers placed along the right margin of to cue the student that they are nearing the edge of paper when writing.
      • Highlight writing lines on worksheets.
      • Draw boxes for words on worksheets for them to write within.
      • Play Simon Says.
      • Practice directions. Draw arrows on a paper pointing up, down, left, and right. Ask your child to point to the direction the arrow is pointing. The child can say the direction the arrows are pointing. Then create actions for each arrow. Up may be jumping. Down may be squatting. The Left arrow might be side sliding to the left, and the Right arrow might be a right high kick. Next, draw more rows of arrows in random order. Ask your child to go through the motions and try to go faster and faster.
       
       
      This map activity is great for building and developing spatial concepts and higher level thinking right in the backyard, using a map and lights to develop spatial relations. Teaching Spatial Concepts to Preschoolers and Toddlers through play. Over, under, around, and through and their need in functional tasks like shoe tying and handwriting. Visual Perception and spatial awareness in kids.  What is Spatial awareness and why do kids have trouble with spacing between letters and words, reversing letters, and all things vision.  Great tips here from an Occupational Therapist, including tips and tools to help kids with spacing in handwriting. What is spatial awareness?  Tips and tools for handwriting, reading, scissors, and all functional skills in kids and adults, from an Occupational Therapist.
       
       

      Other activities to incorporate spatial relations include:

      Try these other activities that challenge visual spatial relations:

      Movement and spatial relations worksheet to improve spatial awareness in kids

      Free Movement and Handwriting Worksheet

      Today’s free printable shares movement based activities to help kids improve their spatial relations. These are the skills kids need to write legibly. It includes tips and activities to improve spatial relations, that were mentioned above. This free handout is a great resource to add to your occupational therapy toolbox.

      You will receive this handout when you join the Handwriting Tips and Tricks series. Each day over the course of 5 days, you’ll receive a free handwriting worksheet to use in addressing common handwriting issues.

      Join the free handwriting series!

      handwriting handouts

      Colleen Beck, OTR/L is an occupational therapist with 20 years experience, graduating from the University of Pittsburgh in 2000. Colleen created The OT Toolbox to inspire therapists, teachers, and parents with easy and fun tools to help children thrive. As the creator, author, and owner of the website and its social media channels, Colleen strives to empower those serving kids of all levels and needs. Want to collaborate? Send an email to contact@theottoolbox.com.

      Baseball and Softball Activity

      baseball and softball activity

      Today I have a fun baseball and softball activity to add to your therapy toolbox. This interactive therapy slide deck goes really well with our other baseball activity (perfect for softball themed fun, too!); this baseball matching game.

      Fun baseball and softball activity is a free slide deck for therapy that addresses handwriting skills, with an interactive Connect 4 game.

      Baseball and softball activity

      This baseball and softball activity is a digital connect four game is a lot like our other more recent digital connect four game with a space thing.

      However this online connect four game has a baseball and softball theme that fits perfectly with the interest of many of the kids we work with.

      Kids that love baseball or softball will love this Connect 4 game that actually addresses therapy goal areas and functional tasks, such as handwriting, letter formation, number formation, eye-hand coordination, visual scanning, visual memory, working memory, visual attention, and more.

      Baseball & Softball Writing Activity

      When you use it in Google slides the game is interactive, allowing kids to move the baseball and softball game pieces to play Connect Four.

      This is just one of the many free slide decks available here on the site. Be sure to grab them all!

      Because users can select the baseball or the softball game pieces, and then move them to cover spaces and play traditional Connect 4 games.

      There is also a slide with letters on each space on the board. When players move their piece to cover that letter, they can write the letter focusing on letter formation. Expand the activity to ask kids to write a word that begins with that letter, or to write a sentence containing words that only begin with that letter. The game is very open-ended to meet the needs of all levels of students.

      You’ll also find a game board containing numbers. Use this to work on number formation. OR, incorporate gross motor movement, balance, coordination, motor planning, and ask kids to do that number of a specific task, like jumping jacks, hops, skips, etc.

      The online connect four game can be played with a therapist or another person and each participant can move the game pieces. Kids that love baseball or softball will love this virtual connect four game!

      All of these are fun ways to address letter and number formation with an interactive and engaging activity.

      Want to add this baseball themed activity or softball themed activity to your therapy Toolbox? Enter your email address into the form below to receive this interactive slide deck. It can be a great tool for a virtual therapy sessions teletherapy or face-to-face therapy activities. Consider even using this in-home or brain break activities in the classroom or at home.

      To receive this free interactive connect four game enter your email address into the form below and it will be delivered to your email address via PDF.

      FREE Baseball & Softball Digital Connect 4 Game

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        Also add our recent baseball emotions spot it matching game for your baseball theme in therapy.

        Colleen Beck, OTR/L is an occupational therapist with 20 years experience, graduating from the University of Pittsburgh in 2000. Colleen created The OT Toolbox to inspire therapists, teachers, and parents with easy and fun tools to help children thrive. As the creator, author, and owner of the website and its social media channels, Colleen strives to empower those serving kids of all levels and needs. Want to collaborate? Send an email to contact@theottoolbox.com.

        Fun Baseball Matching Game

        baseball matching game

        This Baseball matching game is another free slide deck to use in digital or face to face therapy sessions while working on a variety of occupational therapy skill areas. It’s a fun way to foster visual perceptual skills and social emotional learning through a baseball theme!

        Baseball matching game.

        Today we have another social emotional resource for teaching emotions and showing children how to match facial expressions to meaning of emotions this baseball emotions game uses the spot it matching strategies to work on social emotional development as well as visual perceptual skills kids can.

        This is a free therapy slide deck, so it can be used in teletherapy services or virtual sessions. However, now that more schools are moving to a face to face setting in the fall, this resource is still a great way to outline therapy sessions. Use the slides as activities with a baseball theme in therapy.

        Kids can work on social emotional development skills that they need for communication playing with others and social participation by using the game as a tool for social emotional learning skills such as naming facial expressions.

        Baseball matching Game

        This baseball matching activity is great for a baseball theme or for kids that love all things sports and baseball.

        On the slides kids will notice baseball gloves and baseball mitts that have different facial expressions.

        When they play the game they can begin with the first slides that ask them to name and label emotions.

        Kids can type right into the slide deck and name the emotions on different baseballs.

        Then, the slide deck includes a matching component. Users can look at each circle on the slide and look for one matching pair. When they find the match, they can move the baseball bat to cover the matching baseballs.

        Use this game to work on visual perceptual skills such as:

        • Visual discrimination
        • Form constancy
        • Visual attention
        • Visual memory
        • Visual scanning skills

        These visual perceptual and visual motor skills are needed for hand writing and copying materials from a written source such as the chalkboard or dry race board.

        If you were looking for baseball themed activities for therapy this slide deck is a great resource.

        Access this slide deck in by entering your email into the form below and you can receive a free printable PDF which will lead you to the slide deck. This is a great activity for teletherapy or for using to facilitate face-to-face therapy sessions with children who love all things baseball or sports.

        Free Baseball Matching Game Slide Deck

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          Working on building skills this summer? The Summer OT Bundle is for you!

          Summer occupational therapy activities bundle

          Work on fine motor skills, visual perception, visual motor skills, sensory tolerance, handwriting, scissor skills, and much more so that kids can accomplish self-care tasks, learn, and grow through play all summer long.

          This bundle is perfect for the pediatric occupational therapist who needs resources and tools to use in summer therapy sessions, home programs, or extended school year therapy plans.

          This bundle is perfect for parents, grandparents, and caregivers looking to provide developmental fine motor activities designed to help kids build skills.

          • Send kids back to school in the Fall without worrying about the “Summer Slide”.
          • Use these materials to work on areas like hand strength, fine motor development, scissor skills, handwriting, pencil control, pencil grasp, sensory play experiences, and much more. Just pull out the pages or activities you need for your child, and develop skills through play!

          The Summer OT Bundle includes 19 resources that you can print and use over and over again:

          Helping children develop and achieve functional skills this summer was never so easy (or fun!)

          Be sure to grab the Summer OT Bundle, a HUGE resource of therapy tools and activities for all things building skills this summer.

          Grab the Summer OT Bundle here.

          Colleen Beck, OTR/L is an occupational therapist with 20 years experience, graduating from the University of Pittsburgh in 2000. Colleen created The OT Toolbox to inspire therapists, teachers, and parents with easy and fun tools to help children thrive. As the creator, author, and owner of the website and its social media channels, Colleen strives to empower those serving kids of all levels and needs. Want to collaborate? Send an email to contact@theottoolbox.com.